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Imagining the possibility of life in a universe without the weak force

Imagining the possibility of life in a universe without the weak force | education | Scoop.it

A team of researchers at the University of Michigan has conducted a thought experiment regarding the nature of a universe that could support life without the weak force. In their paper uploaded to the ArXiv preprint server, the researchers suggest life could be possible in such an alternative universe, but it would definitely be different from what we observe in ours.

 

Physicists have debated the possibility of the existence of alternate universes for some time, though there is no evidence they exist. In this new thought experiment, the team at UM wondered if one or more of the laws of physics that we have discovered in this universe might not exist in others—if they do exist. Because it would be hard to imagine a universe that could exist without gravity and the strong and electromagnetic forces, the team instead focused on the weak force—the one behind such things as neutrons decaying into protons.

 

The team wondered what a universe without the weak force would look like. To visualize it, they created a simulation of such a universe starting from the Big Bang. In the simulation, matter was still created and condensed into stars, but from there on, things would be different, because in our universe, the weak force is responsible for the creation of the heavier elements. In a universe without the weak force, the existence of anything other than stars would require more free protons and fewer neutrons (because they could not decay). In such a universe, neutrons and protons could link up to make deuterium.

 

Stars fueled by deuterium instead of hydrogen, the researchers note, would still shine, they would just look different—likely redder and larger. But such stars could also serve as the source of all of the elements in the periodic table prior to iron, and the stellar winds could carry them out into space. If planets happened to form, they further note, they could hold water made from deuterium rather than hydrogen—and it is not impossible to imagine, they suggest, life forms made with deuterium water.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Discomfort Is The Price Of Admission To A Meaningful Life

Discomfort Is The Price Of Admission To A Meaningful Life | education | Scoop.it
Ultra-athlete Rich Roll talks with Harvard psychologist Susan David, PhD about confronting difficult feelings, behavior change & her book 'Emotional Agility'.

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Investorideas.com - AI Expo: London's Leading AI Conference; AI Expo Global introduces stellar speaker line-up

Investorideas.com - AI Expo: London's Leading AI Conference; AI Expo Global introduces stellar speaker line-up | education | Scoop.it
AI Expo: London's Leading AI Conference; AI Expo Global introduces stellar speaker line-up

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Scientists Find Over 500 Genes Linked To Intelligence

Scientists Find Over 500 Genes Linked To Intelligence | education | Scoop.it
A new piece of research has identified over 500 genes that appear to be linked to sharp intelligence.

 

How much a person’s intelligence is governed by nature or nurture has been debated throughout the ages. A new piece of research has thrown some interesting evidence into the mix, identifying over 500 genes that appear to be linked to sharp intelligence.

 

The research is the largest study looking at how genes and intelligence are linked to date. Using the heaps of data gathered by the UK Biobank, scientists at the University of Edinburgh, the University of Southampton, and Harvard University compared DNA variants in over 248,000 people from across the world.

 

As they explain in the Nature journal Molecular Psychiatry, they managed to find 538 genes that play a role in intellectual ability, along with 187 regions in the human genome that are linked to cognitive skills.

 

In theory, this means that scientists could get an insight into your IQ just by analyzing your spit in a pot. As part of this new study, the researchers tested out this idea and managed to predict differences in intelligence of a group of individuals using their DNA alone. 

 

“Our study identified a large number of genes linked to intelligence," Dr David Hill, from the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Cognitive Aging and Cognitive Epidemiology, said in a statement. "Importantly, we were also able to identify some of the biological processes that genetic variation appears to influence to produce such differences in intelligence, and we were also able to predict intelligence in another group using only their DNA.” 

 

That said, the impact of genetics or environment on a person’s intelligence remains as hazy as ever. Their study was only able to predict 7 percent of the intelligence differences between those people, which is not totally definitive. “We know that environments and genes both contribute to the differences we observe in people’s intelligence," Professor Ian Deary, Principal Investigator, added.

 

"This study adds to what we know about which genes influence intelligence, and suggests that health and intelligence are related in part because some of the same genes influence them.”

 

So, don’t be too disheartened by the suggestion that some aspects of intelligence could be programmed into your DNA. Just as other scientific studies have suggested, it appears that the brilliance of your brain is also influenced by a cocktail of external influences, from your upbringing and life experiences, to even your health.


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Anxiety Makes It Harder to Listen to Your Intuition

Anxiety Makes It Harder to Listen to Your Intuition | education | Scoop.it

New research shows that people who are feeling anxious have a harder time making decisions than people who are feeling optimistic. - "I’ve remained somewhat convinced that there is a 'real' gut instinct somewhere beneath all my fake ones, and if only I knew how to access it, I would finally be perfectly wise, centered, and calm." Do you trust your gut instincts?


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2018: A Big Year for NASA's Launch Program

2018: A Big Year for NASA's Launch Program | education | Scoop.it

If there's a magic number for NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP) at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, it could be six. That's because there are six primary NASA missions scheduled to launch from two different coasts, within about six months, atop six different rocket configurations (five different rockets).

 

"Not since 2003 has the Launch Services Program had a denser and more diverse manifest as it will this year," said Chuck Dovale, the program's deputy manager. "We are poised and ready for the challenges ahead."

 

"It's going to be an exceptional year, with a variety of launches," said Tim Dunn, LSP launch director.

 

Kicking off the year will be the launch of NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-S, or GOES-S. The satellite is scheduled to launch on March 1, atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), on the east coast. 

 

The GOES-S weather satellite, which will be renamed GOES-17, will launch into a geostationary orbit around the Earth and join its predecessor GOES-R (now GOES-16), which was launched just over a year ago. The satellite will help give the big weather picture, including precise data on hurricanes.

 

Following closely behind will be the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, which will launch March 20 atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at CCAFS.

TESS will search for planets outside our solar system, including those that could support life.

 

The Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, or InSight, is the first of two interplanetary missions, and the first one ever launching from the west coast. The probe will launch on its mission to Mars on May 5 atop a ULA Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex-3E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

 

InSight is a NASA Discovery Program mission. The single lander will descend to the surface of Mars and use its seismic sensors to study the interior of the Red Planet.

 

The second interplanetary mission is the Parker Solar Probe. The spacecraft, about the size of a small car, will launch July 31 atop a ULA Delta IV Heavy rocket from Space Launch Complex 37 at CCAFS. The probe will travel to about 4 million miles from the Sun's surface and study the giant fireball's corona.

 

"The Parker Solar Probe is truly our 'shiny object' mission," said Omar Baez, LSP launch director for this mission. "It is the first time we will fly a Delta IV Heavy with a science payload. We need to meet the very short 20-day planetary opportunity."

 

Dunn said that interplanetary missions are more difficult. Those missions, by their very nature and how the trajectories work, have very precise windows when they can launch. For example, to get to Mars this year, the program has only about a 4.5-week period between early May and the first week of June to launch, or the program would have to stand down for about 26 months.

 

On Sept. 12, the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, will launch atop the final United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex-2W at Vandenberg.

 

"As a 'parent' of many rockets, we're not supposed to have favorites," Dunn said, "but the final launch of a Delta II rocket will hold a special place in my heart. I worked on the Delta II team back in the 1990s at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It was there that I really learned the inner workings of what it takes to launch that particular rocket."

 

ICESat-2 will carry a single instrument, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System, or ATLAS. It will gauge the slope of Earth's surface and gather data to estimate the annual height change of Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets to within 4 millimeters – the width of a pencil.

 

The Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, will launch aboard an Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket later this year. Pegasus is the only airborne-launched rocket. It will be attached beneath the company's L-1011 Stargazer aircraft, carried to 39,000 feet, and then released for launch. 


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First look at Jupiter’s poles show strange geometric arrays of storms

First look at Jupiter’s poles show strange geometric arrays of storms | education | Scoop.it

The biggest planet in the solar system has no tilt as it moves, so its poles have never been visible from Earth. But in the past two years, with NASA’s Juno spacecraft, scientists have gotten a good look at the top and bottom of the planet for the first time. What they found astounded them: bizarre geometric arrangements of storms, each arrayed around one cyclone over the north and south poles—unlike any storm formation seen in the universe.

 

The new study, authored by scientists from an international group of institutions including the University of Chicago, is published in March 8’s Nature as part of a set of four papers dedicated to new observations from the Juno spacecraft. Juno launched in 2011 with the ambitious mission of finally seeing beneath the dense clouds covering Jupiter. On July 4, 2016, it finally reached the planet’s orbit. Since then it’s been orbiting the planet, taking pictures and measuring the planet’s profile in infrared, microwave, ultraviolet, gravity and magnetism—and answering questions scientists have had about Jupiter for decades.

 

One of these was the question of what lay at its elusive poles. When scientists got the first images, they were stunned. At the north pole, eight storms surrounded one storm at the center. At the south pole, it was the same arrangement, only with five storms. But the numbers stayed oddly constant; the storms weren’t drifting and merging, as our current understanding of the science suggested they should.

 

“They are extraordinarily stable arrangements of such chaotic elements,” said Morgan O’Neill, a University of Chicago postdoctoral scholar and a co-author on the paper. “We’d never seen anything like it.”


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Optimizing Emotions for Performance •

Optimizing Emotions for Performance • | education | Scoop.it
Can emotions be part of organizational strategy? Here are three mini-cases on improving performance by being smart with feelings, aka, emotional intelligence.

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And so they continue doing it ... one of the core topics of my series THE FUTURE OF EMOTIONS. Efficiency and optimization of your emotions so you can continue being "in the game." Whose game?

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Do You Make This One Big Mistake About Emotional Intelligence? 

Daniel Goleman
 

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The tools matter and the tools don’t matter

The tools matter and the tools don’t matter | education | Scoop.it
Though you might not think it from the comic, I’m actually sympathetic to questions about tools and process, as I myself am a kind of process junky. I love

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Why Self-Taught Artificial Intelligence Has Trouble With the Real World

Why Self-Taught Artificial Intelligence Has Trouble With the Real World | education | Scoop.it
Until very recently, the machines that could trounce champions were at least respectful enough to start by learning from human experience.

To beat Garry Kasparov at chess in 1997, IBM engineers made use of centuries of chess wisdom in their Deep Blue computer. In 2016, Google DeepMind’s AlphaGo thrashed champion Lee Sedol at the ancient board game Go after poring over millions of positions from tens of thousands of human games.

But now artificial intelligence researchers are rethinking the way their bots incorporate the totality of human knowledge. The current trend is: Don’t bother.

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How a Steel Box Changed the World: A Brief History of Shipping

"As the container shipping industry continues to boom, companies are adopting new technologies to move cargo faster and shifting to crewless ships. But it’s not all been smooth sailing and the future will see fewer players stay above water."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 2, 7:38 AM
Unit 6 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 4:07 PM
Unit 6
dustin colprit's curator insight, September 29, 11:38 PM
The use of shipping containers has provided many positive results. People receive access to goods and supplies from all around the globe thanks to shipping containers. Recently they've even been given other uses. People have begun modifying them into livable structures.
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Investorideas.com Newswire - Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Driving; The Brave New World of Driving

Investorideas.com Newswire - Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Driving; The Brave New World of Driving | education | Scoop.it
Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Driving; The Brave New World of Driving

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InvestorIdeas's curator insight, February 26, 12:04 PM

Companies Mentioned: Gopher Protocol (OTCQB: $GOPH), Tesla (NASDAQ: $TSLA), Intel (NASDAQ: $INTC), Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ: $GOOG, NASDAQ: $GOOGL), STMicroelectronics (NYSE: $STM)

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Investorideas.com Newswire - Gopher (OTCQB: $GOPH) Commences Development of AI Mesh Technology for IoT Design Immersion of Next Generation of Guardian Tracking Technology

Investorideas.com Newswire - Gopher (OTCQB: $GOPH) Commences Development of AI Mesh Technology for IoT Design Immersion of Next Generation of Guardian Tracking Technology | education | Scoop.it
Gopher (OTCQB: $GOPH) Commences Development of AI Mesh Technology for IoT Design Immersion of Next Generation of Guardian Tracking Technology

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How Women Experience Addiction Differently Than Men

How Women Experience Addiction Differently Than Men | education | Scoop.it

Addiction to substances such as heroin and alcohol affect women differently than men. A 2010 American Journal of Public Health study found that women were more likely to be prescribed opioids than men and to continue them long-term. Another study of chronic pain patients prescribed opioids in the Journal of Pain revealed that women’s increased risk of opioid misuse was related to emotional issues while men misused opioids because of legal and behavioral problems.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women are more likely to have chronic pain, be prescribed prescription painkillers and at higher doses than men; and become dependent more quickly than men. From 1999 to 2010, CDC data revealed that 48,000 women died of prescription-related overdoses. During this timeframe, prescription overdose deaths increased over 400% among women, versus 237% among men. The sobering statistics don’t end with prescriptions. The National Center for Health Statistics reported heroin overdose deaths among women tripled from 2010 through 2013.


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A new mysterious purple aurora found and named 'Steve'

A new mysterious purple aurora found and named 'Steve' | education | Scoop.it

The phenomenon of ‘Steve’ - a glowing arc seen in Alberta, Canada by amateur scientists – has now been named by Nasa the unusual name 'Steve'..

 

The history behind this discovery is the following: A group of citizen scientists in Alberta, Canada, weren’t sure what the glowing purple (sometimes green) arc in the night sky they had been photographing really was. Nor were the scientists Elizabeth MacDonald, a space physicist at Nasa, and Eric Donovan, an associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Calgary; the group – known as the Alberta Aurora Chasers, who photograph the Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights – showed them their pictures in a pub. It wasn’t, Donovan told them, a proton aurora (the northern lights are normally a result of electrons colliding with gases in the Earth’s atmosphere), as they had thought. “They pulled up this beautiful photograph of this thing,” Donovan told the New York Times last year. “And I’m like, ‘I don’t know what that is, but it’s not the proton aurora.’” It needed a name: “Steve” sounded as good as any. It was inspired by a scene in the 2006 animation Over the Hedge, in which the animal characters are confronted with a mysterious row of shrubs.

 

The phenomenon does now have a backronym of an official name: strong thermal emission velocity enhancement (Steve for short). It can be spotted further south than the northern lights and is thought to be, according to a recently published paper, “an optical manifestation” of another phenomenon, the sub-auroral ion drift. Steve is a visible strip of ionized gas, traveling at 4 miles/s.

 

Last week, Nasa called on citizen scientists and photographers to help with its research into Steve and report sightings to the Aurorasaurus project. It is, Donovan has said, “a truly new era” of collaboration between amateur scientists and professionals.


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If you thought spacial entanglement was weird, check out entanglement of 'time'

If you thought spacial entanglement was weird, check out entanglement of 'time' | education | Scoop.it

In the summer of 1935, the physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger engaged in a rich, multifaceted and sometimes fretful correspondence about the implications of the new theory of quantum mechanics. The focus of their worry was what Schrödinger later dubbed entanglement: the inability to describe two quantum systems or particles independently, after they have interacted.

 

Until his death, Einstein remained convinced that entanglement showed how quantum mechanics was incomplete. Schrödinger thought that entanglement was the defining feature of the new physics, but this didn’t mean that he accepted it lightly. ‘I know of course how the hocus pocus works mathematically,’ he wrote to Einstein on 13 July 1935. ‘But I do not like such a theory.’

 

Schrödinger’s famous cat, suspended between life and death, first appeared in these letters, a byproduct of the struggle to articulate what bothered the pair.

 

The problem is that entanglement violates how the world ought to work. Information can’t travel faster than the speed of light, for one. But in a 1935 paper, Einstein and his co-authors showed how entanglement leads to what’s now called quantum nonlocality, the eerie link that appears to exist between entangled particles. If two quantum systems meet and then separate, even across a distance of thousands of lightyears, it becomes impossible to measure the features of one system (such as its position, momentum and polarity) without instantly steering the other into a corresponding state. 

 

Up to today, most experiments have tested entanglement over spatial gaps. The assumption is that the ‘nonlocal’ part of quantum nonlocality refers to the entanglement of properties across space. But what if entanglement also occurs across time? Is there such a thing as temporal nonlocality?

 

The answer, as it turns out, is "yes". Just when you thought quantum mechanics couldn’t get any weirder, a team of physicists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem reported in 2013 that they had successfully entangled photons that never coexisted. Previous experiments involving a technique called ‘entanglement swapping’ had already showed quantum correlations across time, by delaying the measurement of one of the coexisting entangled particles; but Eli Megidish and his collaborators were the first to show entanglement between photons whose lifespans did not overlap at all.


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Donald Schwartz's curator insight, March 16, 6:50 PM

This may require multiple readings, but imagine I will be rewarded.

 

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Investorideas.com - Companies Using Artificial Intelligence Technology for Niche Markets and Specific Applications; Key to Success

Investorideas.com - Companies Using Artificial Intelligence Technology for Niche Markets and Specific Applications; Key to Success | education | Scoop.it
Companies Using Artificial Intelligence Technology for Niche Markets and Specific Applications; Key to Success

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InvestorIdeas's curator insight, March 13, 11:27 AM

Companies Mentioned: Gopher Protocol (OTCQB: $GOPH), Fortinet (NASDAQ:FTNT), Netflix, Inc. (NFLX), PayPal Holdings, Inc. (PYPL)

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Gopher Protocol: A revolutionary AI technology developing a more reliable mesh network

Gopher Protocol: A revolutionary AI technology developing a more reliable mesh network | education | Scoop.it
The CTO of Gopher protocol explains how the firm's pet-tracking technology could lead to a more reliable form of mesh network

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Obesity: not just a rich-world problem

"Obesity is a global problem, but more people are getting fatter in developing countries than anywhere else. If current trends continue, obese children will soon outnumber those who are undernourished. Nearly half of the world’s overweight and obese children under five years old, live in Asia. And in Africa, the number of overweight children under five has increased by nearly 50% since 2000. Hunger still blights many parts of the world. But the share of people who do not have enough to eat is in decline. Globally one in nine people in the world suffer from chronic undernourishment. One in ten are obese. If current trends continue, the share of obese children in the world will surpass the number of undernourished by 2022. Africa has the fastest-growing middle class in the world. A move from traditional foods to high-calorie fast food and a more sedentary lifestyle is driving the rise in obesity. Health systems in Africa, more focused on treating malnourishment and diseases like malaria and HIV, are ill equipped to deal with obesity-related illnesses like heart disease and diabetes. "

 

Tags: mortality, medical, development, food.


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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 8, 11:27 AM
This video has taught me some new facts in regard to the obesity crisis going on in the world. Growing up, I would hear so much about the obesity crisis here in America and how the rest of the world is so healthy for the most part. This video has given me a new perspective on the current obesity crisis, and that it isn't just an American problem anymore, but is now becoming a global problem.
One part of this video in particular which stood out to me was that in all of these developing nations that are suddenly becoming obese, American fast food chains are embedding themselves in their societies. It's no wonder that obesity is no longer just an American problem, but becoming a wold crisis since all of these American fast food chains are moving into these developing nations. It seems as though if the world wants to see a decline in obesity, we must stop eating so much processed food from these types of restaurants and get the proper amount of exercise needed for a healthy lifestyle.
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Are Americans trashing the English language?

"Are American's trashing the English language? The Economists language expert, Lane Greene, knows a thing or two about English. Lane is a fan of words, lots of words, and Lane is an American living in London. He's become accustomed to British English slang. But Lane often hears Britons complain that there are too many American words and expressions creeping into British English, these are called Americanisms. British writer Matthew Engel can't stand Americanisms being used in Britain and even wrote a book about it. But are Americanisms trashing British English?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2017 5:47 PM

This video touches on important cultural and spatial dynamics of the linguistic change impacting the world's current lingua franca...in other words, this is incredibly relevant to human geography. 

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, diffusion,

 colonialism.

Matt Manish's curator insight, March 8, 12:00 PM
I found this video very enjoyable to watch and I learned a lot more about how British people feel about the American language, especially in their own culture. I knew that American English and British English had some small differences with the spelling of some words and differences in some terms for the same object such as lift and elevator. But I didn't realize how some American phrases or "Americanisms" have crept into the British English language and are causing some English citizens to be upset about it.
In response to this information, I have to side with Lane Greene's opinion towards the end of this video. The fact that "Americanisms" are creeping into the British English language is the sign of a healthy and developing language. It means that one language that is being affected by another language because it has a global reach throughout the world. This is a positive thing that shouldn't be feared because as we can see from history, languages change over time and tend to never stay the same.
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Gaining a deeper understanding of the genetics of autism

Gaining a deeper understanding of the genetics of autism | education | Scoop.it

It’s been 10 years since Michael Wigler had a breakthrough revelation in autism genetics — one that arguably launched the field as we know it. In April 2007, Wigler and his then colleague, Jonathan Sebat, reported that ‘de novo’ mutations — those that arise spontaneously instead of being inherited — occur more often in people with autism than in typical people. The mutations they noted were in the form of ‘copy number variants’ (CNVs), deletions or duplications of long stretches of DNA. CNVs crop up frequently in cancer, an earlier focus of Wigler’s work. But his find that they are also involved in autism came as a surprise to those in the field. “Genetics was striking out with other efforts based on transmission and inheritance,” Wigler says. “In that vacuum, the new idea was quickly embraced.”

 

The discovery fast led to further advances. Focusing primarily on de novomutations, three teams of scientists, including one led by Wigler, began hunting for genes that contribute to autism. Their approach was efficient: Rather than looking at the entire genome, they scoured the 2 percent that encodes proteins, called the exome. And they looked specifically at simplex families, which have a single child with autism and unaffected parents and siblings. The premise was that comparing the exomes of the family members might expose de novo mutations in the child with autism. The approach yielded a bumper crop: Based on data from more than 600 families, the teams together predicted that there are hundreds of autism genes. They identified six as leading candidates. Some of the genes identified at the time — CHD8, DYRK1A, SCN2A — quickly became hot areas of research.

 

In 2014, the number of strong candidates jumped higher. In two massive studies analyzing the sequences of more than 20,000 people, researchers linked 50 genes to autism with high confidence. Wigler’s team looked at simplex families and found rare de novo mutations in 27 genes. In the second study, researchers screened for both inherited and de novo mutations and implicated 33 genes. The two studies identified 10 genes in common.

 

Then, in 2016, the tally of autism gene candidates shot up again. Deploying statistical wizardry to combine the data on de novo and inherited mutations, along with CNV data from the Autism Genome Project, researchers pinpointed 65 genes and six CNVs as being key to autism. They also identified 28 genes that they could say with near certainty are ‘autism genes.’

 

“For so long, we’ve been saying if we could just find these genes, we’d be able to really make some headway,” says Stephan Sanders, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, who co-led the study. “Suddenly, you’ve got this list of 65-plus genes, which we know have a causative role in autism, and as a foundation for going forward, it’s amazing.”


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Daniel Goleman on Emotions, Wellbeing & Mindfulness •

Daniel Goleman on Emotions, Wellbeing & Mindfulness • | education | Scoop.it
“Ultimate wellbeing has nothing to do with what's outside us,” says Daniel Goleman. What would happen if we could fully take charge of our own wellbeing... and what's the neuroscience that will help make it so?

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China will soon have air power rivaling the West’s - No longer just catch-up

China will soon have air power rivaling the West’s - No longer just catch-up | education | Scoop.it

“China’s president, Xi Jinping, wants to be able to challenge America’s military might in the western Pacific. He is making big progress. China’s once bloated armed forces are becoming leaner and a lot more capable. They are also benefiting from a defense budget that is growing at a steady 6-7% a year, in line with GDP. The IISS declares that China has become an innovator in military technology and is not merely ‘catching up’ with the West. For some of the most advanced science, Mr. Xi is tapping the private sector. The Pentagon has to woo skeptical Silicon Valley companies; firms in China do what the government tells them to do. In two years’ time, if not before, America is likely to lose its monopoly of radar-beating stealth combat aircraft with the introduction into service of China’s Chengdu J-20.”

 

Tags: political, military, China, geopolitics, East Asia.


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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 8, 10:56 AM
From reading this article, it is clear for one to see that China is not just "catching up" to America with their military technology, but are becoming a true rival. The President of China is clearly putting a larger emphasis on restructuring the Chinese military. The Chinese government is also trimming the fat their military has had before in the past and creating a larger, more organized budget for their military branch. One major advantage China has over America, is that its private sector non-state tech firms have to do what their government tells them to do. Unlike the American government where they have to create deals and contracts with non-state tech firms for new military technology. This allows China to demand whatever they want from their tech firms in order to advance their military technology. Although, as long as American tech firms continue improve in their technology at an advanced rate and maintain a good relationship with the American government, the U.S. military will continue to be a strong rival in the present day arms race. It remains clear though, that America will indeed have to break a sweat in order to supersede China in regards to advancement in military technology. 
dustin colprit's curator insight, September 29, 11:21 PM
While it is always possible for a country to increase it's strength. It is still a slightly unsettling reality knowing this increases their influence on the globe, while opening the possibility of future confrontation from an equal military force.
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3 Words That Reframe, “How Was Your Day?” | Expert Tips & Advice . PBS Parents | PBS

3 Words That Reframe, “How Was Your Day?” | Expert Tips & Advice . PBS Parents | PBS | education | Scoop.it
Emotions are not simply good or bad. All emotions are part of the human experience.

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Science Reveals More About The Secrets Of 'Super-Agers'

Science Reveals More About The Secrets Of 'Super-Agers' | education | Scoop.it
Aging well is a topic most people have a personal interest in—science certainly does. And it’s revealed some interesting findings in recent years, as long-term studies on “super agers” from across the globe have come in. Of the general population, about a third of people above the age of 90 have dementia, and another third have cognitive decline. But it’s the remaining group of healthy agers that’s so intriguing to researchers.

A couple of new studies presented at a recent American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting looked at people who live well as they age—often into their 90s or beyond. What’s peculiar, and encouraging, is that a lot of how we age has to do not with genetics but with our choices—how we live, physically and socially. And this means that more may be in our control than we think.

One of the new studies, “The 90+ Study,” as the name suggests, has tracked people in their 90s in just about every way possible for 15 years—physical exams, detailed analysis of their social lives and lifestyle habits, and multiple brain scans, before and (if the person died during the study) after death. The other study, on “Super Agers,” looked at people in their 80s, whose cognition and memory matches that of people decades younger.


One factor that played a big role in how a person aged was social interaction: People who lived longer had very close relationships over the years. This connection has been found in many studies on long-term health, the most famous of which was the 80-year Harvard study that found relationships were a key predictor of longevity. “There are brain benefits of having good friends,” said Super Ager study author Emily Rogalski at a press conference.

Another important factor in aging well was, interestingly, drinking alcohol: Those who drank a couple of glasses of wine or beer per day were more likely to live longer, compared to abstainers. “That’s been shown all over the world,” said 90+ Study author Claudia Kawas at the conference. ”I have no explanation for it, but I do firmly believe that modest drinking is associated with longevity.”

Happily, “modest” caffeine intake was also associated with living longer. “The sweet spot for caffeine was 200-400 milligrams a day,” said Kawas.”which, depending on whether you’re a Starbucks fan or an old-fashioned drinker, is about two cups of coffee probably.” People who took in this much from coffee or tea lived longer than people who consumed more or less caffeine.

Another factor was exercising regularly, which isn’t so surprising: People who got as little as 15 minutes per day had an advantage when it came to longevity, and the effect rose with 30 and 45 minutes/day. There was no huge benefit above that, so people who exercised for hours a day had no advantage over those who exercised for 45 minutes.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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