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Rescooped by Lee Turner from Leadership in Distance Education
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Developing Accessible e-Learning – Where to Begin

Developing Accessible e-Learning – Where to Begin | education | Scoop.it
With so many instructional design models, online content and e-Learning development tools it’s easy to get overwhelmed with choices or waylaid by the tools...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Scooped by Lee Turner
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Debbie Morrison - "Start Here": Instructional Design Models for Online Courses

Debbie Morrison - "Start Here": Instructional Design Models for Online Courses | education | Scoop.it

An instructional design model is the place to start—it is a framework, a tool that guides the structure of a course, that leads the learner to a topic, that removes distractions, provides focus, but still allows a learner to take control. Effective instructional design also helps an instructor to teach, to guide and support learners, and to promote meaningful and active learning. When an online course is not well-designed, often the student doesn’t know where to start, is not sure where to find resources, how to interact, or how to learn. Furthermore, if a student is preoccupied about technical aspects of the course due to ambiguous instructions, glitches, or cumbersome applications, the focus becomes not on learning, but on the technology—more barriers.

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Rescooped by Lee Turner from Educational Technology News
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9-Step Instructional Process that Just Works

9-Step Instructional Process that Just Works | education | Scoop.it

"ack in 1965, Robert Gagne detailed a nine-step instructional process that many teachers, trainers, and instructional designers still use today when creating their learning events.  The steps are not meant to be absolute rules, but they do provide a a good place to start during the creation process. Truth is, there are many design models you can use, so feel free to just add this one to your toolbox as it could very well prove useful."


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Rescooped by Lee Turner from Educational Technology News
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Is "Design Thinking" Missing From the ADDIE?

Is "Design Thinking" Missing From the ADDIE? | education | Scoop.it

"Even though a crucial part of our jobs involve design, the prevailing instructional design models are based on systems thinking. Systems thinking promotes an analytical or engineering type of mindset. But we also need an approach to help us synthesize, innovate and create. In many design fields today, people who are required to create on demand use a design thinking model for this purpose."


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Rescooped by Lee Turner from The 21st Century
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Instructional Design Models and Methods | Instructional Design Central

Instructional Design Models and Methods | Instructional Design Central | education | Scoop.it
Learn about instructional design models and instructional methods for online course design and design for instruction.

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Fatenah Issa's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:58 PM

This is a great list of the main ID models.  I especially like the graphic and dynamic style of Cathy's Moore's Action Mapping.

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Designing the Wheel: Built-in Instructional Technology (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Designing the Wheel: Built-in Instructional Technology (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | education | Scoop.it
EDUCAUSE Review Online (Designing the Wheel: Built-in Instructional Technology http://t.co/frnaMRvTkP)

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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, September 20, 2013 12:51 PM

 

Rationale for a Course Design Model

 

A common concern about faculty development courses is that although faculty might be subject content experts, they often do not have a background in learning theory. Many experienced faculty members have developed a sense of what will and won't work within their discipline; however, when faced with developing a new course or redesigning a course to incorporate more active learning, instructional technologies, distance education, core curriculum demands, and the like, they struggle with how to approach the course design.

In business and industry, training facilitators have models such as ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation) to lead them through the course design and development process. These are usually based on a "backward design" model, which provides a recommended methodology for designing a course based on desired end results — student outcomes — as opposed to a design based on what material must be covered. Their beginning point and some follow-up actions differ from higher education approaches for a variety of reasons, two primary ones being that (1) typically, the goal of training facilitators is to resolve a workplace problem, as opposed to providing education, and (2) training facilitators typically work in a much shorter time frame than a semester-long course. Some other approaches, such as Caffarella's, attempt to provide guidance to training facilitators and educators; however, these models target professional instructional designers and, as such, assume prior expertise in instructional design.1

Another common higher education issue is that well-intentioned faculty sometimes try to use instructional technologies without sound pedagogical reasons,2 which can adversely affect learning,3 student teaching evaluations,4 and technology use.5 Providing a single, faculty-focused course design model leverages the pedagogical purposes and uses of an instructional technology. The combination of theory and practical use offers more of a just-in-time application for faculty.

 

Applying the Wheel Model

 

The first cohort of faculty that went through the IMPACT program participated in workshops that covered many topics involved in course redesign/design, loosely based on a backward design model. About a year into the program, it became apparent that the workshops didn't provide a complete, consistent, and systematic approach to course design in the university setting. It also became evident that a more deliberate course design model, designed specifically for faculty, could help faculty by providing a systematic process.

Reframing the IMPACT workshops with the course design wheel has enabled the workshop leaders to stress active learning and the role that different instructional technologies can play. Faculty exposure to technologies takes two forms:

Various technologies are used during the workshops to demonstrate how they can support teaching and learning.IMPACT participants bring in issues they are having, such as "How do I manage all my students' e-mail?" or "How can I better manage students working in groups?"

By providing the course design model to faculty, we have also been able to both systematically and spontaneously incorporate information about technologies they might find useful. For example, when faculty members are developing their lesson plans (during the Develop and Teach Course phase), we have a section on active learning techniques that ties to a grid of active learning techniques and possible technologies to support them (see figure 3).

 

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