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Getting students to TEACH, not to PRESENT!

Getting students to TEACH, not to PRESENT! | education | Scoop.it

Getting students to research and then present their findings to the class can be done in a number of ways. However, consider ditching the word ‘presentation’ in favour of ̵…


Via Shona Whyte
Karina Scholtz Mulder's insight:

This is really the way to learn!

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, November 10, 2015 7:19 AM

This is a good way of putting it to try and avoid death by powerpoint.

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Elena's curator insight, November 10, 2015 9:29 AM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by Karina Scholtz Mulder from Technology and Leadership in Education
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What Parents Can Gain From Learning the Science of Talking to Kids

What Parents Can Gain From Learning the Science of Talking to Kids | education | Scoop.it

there are certain technologies that can actually increase social interaction: “A recent study shows that if you had a Skype with your grandmother,” Suskind said, “somebody on the other side of the screen responding [to your child], that counts! A human being on the other side of the technology works.”


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Anna Hu 's curator insight, October 16, 2015 9:58 AM

talk to children as if they understand! And do it often and use a diverse vocabulary.

Rescooped by Karina Scholtz Mulder from Teaching + Learning + Policy
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We're Boring Our Kids In School

We're Boring Our Kids In School | education | Scoop.it

"In 1967, media critic Marshall McLuhan predicted that within two decades, technology would make school unrecognizable. “As it is now, the teacher has a ready-made audience,” he wrote. “He is assured of a full house and a long run. Those students who don’t like the show get flunking grades.” But if students were given the choice to get their information elsewhere, he predicted, “the quality of the experience called education will change drastically. The educator then will naturally have a high stake in generating interest and involvement for his students.” McLuhan was right about one thing: students can now get much of their information elsewhere. Many young people “are now deeply and permanently technologically enhanced,” said business and education consultant Marc Prensky—his observation will hit home to anyone who has watched teenagers sit in a Starbucks, wait in line at a Walgreens checkout stand, or attend a family function. But in school, those who don’t like the show still get flunking grades. However, these students have a vision of something different. They now have the experience, outside of school, of diving into worlds that are richer and more relevant than anything they get in school. There’s a technical term for this phenomenon, in which someone sees the possibilities that lie just out of reach but must spend time doing lesser things. It’s called boredom, or as theologian Paul Tillich once described it, “rage spread thin.” | via Salon


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Rescooped by Karina Scholtz Mulder from Teaching + Learning + Policy
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Research Casts Doubt On Grading Teachers By Student Scores

Research Casts Doubt On Grading Teachers By Student Scores | education | Scoop.it

"In the first large-scale analysis of new systems that evaluate teachers based partly on student test scores, two researchers found little or no correlation between quality teaching and the appraisals teachers received. The study, published Tuesday in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, is the latest in a growing body of research that has cast doubt on whether it is possible for states to use empirical data in identifying good and bad teachers. “The concern is that these state tests and these measures of evaluating teachers don’t really seem to be associated with the things we think of as defining good teaching,” said Morgan S. Polikoff, an assistant professor of education at the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California. He worked on the analysis with Andrew C. Porter, dean and professor of education at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania." | by Lyndsey Layton


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Trevor's curator insight, October 15, 2015 7:31 PM

I agree

Shelly Reckow VanVoorst's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:33 PM

I scooped this article because it highlights the idea that some evaluation systems do concentrate on what makes good teaching.  I feel like in our case, we worked hard as a group (the whole ISD) to find an evaluation system that was fair while being reliable and keeping improvement at the front of the focus.  I hope that teachers reading this realize that not all evaluation systems consider the improvement process teachers should go through no matter how long they have been in education.

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Angela Lee Duckworth: The key to success? Grit

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized t...
Karina Scholtz Mulder's insight:

become more with motivation

 

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60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know

60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know | education | Scoop.it
60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Javier Sánchez Bolado, Juergen Wagner, Lynnette Van Dyke
Karina Scholtz Mulder's insight:

Great ways to engage students

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Richard Whiteside's curator insight, November 20, 2015 5:03 AM

A useful list of possible ways for students to demonstrate understanding. Nothing else, just a list, so a good place to refresh your memory, or get a new idea ver quickly!

Campus Extens - UIB Virtual -'s curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:23 AM

Aquest article ofereix una llista de propostes, i eines digitals per aplicar-les.

Grupo 4 - La nueva sociedad's curator insight, November 25, 2017 3:48 PM
El proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje para que sea realmente significativo implica la participación del alumnado, en esta participación el papel del docente es fundamental(guía, orienta, estimula....). Disponer en la programación educativa de una serie de recursos educativos que faciliten al alumnado la comunicación de lo aprendido resulta fundamental para que desarrollen un rol de prosumidor frente a una mera bùsqueda de información, simplificando metodologías tan necesarias como la clase invertida .
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4 Ways We Can Spark Our Empathy, and Why We Need to Hire for Experiential Empathy

4 Ways We Can Spark Our Empathy, and Why We Need to Hire for Experiential Empathy | education | Scoop.it
What we are born with is cognitive empathy - the ability to understand another person's perspective or mental state. While cognitive empathy is important as a foundational emotion in our minds, it's by far not as critical as the emotional empathy we develop over time. 

Emotional empathy is the ability to feel another person's plight because there's some shared experience, past or present, that resonates with the one feeling empathy.

Jason Martin

 

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Angela K. Adams's curator insight, October 9, 2015 8:38 AM

I chose this resource because I feel it is important for educators to understand the struggles their students might be dealing with and not just feel sorry for them.  I hope that this resource will raise awareness among educators that they need to genuinely care about their students; that they need to build a relationship with them and invest in them.

Rescooped by Karina Scholtz Mulder from Teaching + Learning + Policy
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When Homework Causes More Harm Than Good

When Homework Causes More Harm Than Good | education | Scoop.it

"Research suggests that while homework can be an effective learning tool, assigning too much can lower student performance and interfere with other important activities. Homework can boost learning, but doing too much can be detrimental The National PTA and National Education Association support the "ten-minute homework rule," which recommends ten minutes of homework per grade level, per night (ten minutes for first grade, 20 minutes for second grade, and so on, up to two hours for 12th grade) (Cooper, 2010). A recent study found that when middle school students were assigned more than 90-100 minutes of homework per day, their math and science scores began to decline (Fernández-Alonso, Suárez-Álvarez, & Muñiz, 2015). Giving students too much homework can lead to fatigue, stress, and a loss of interest in academics -- something that we all want to avoid." | via Edutopia


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Shelly Reckow VanVoorst's curator insight, October 25, 2015 11:36 AM

I scooped this article because homework is a big debate for our school right now.  Historically our school has had the belief that a lot, if any, homework should be assigned at night.  Typically our belief has been that students who are at-risk do not have the resources or the time available after school to complete homework with the concentration needed to be successful.  I hope that others from the school will read this article and take points into consideration as our talks move forward within the realm of deciding on homework.

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Discovery Education: Math Techbook in Action

Watch an Algebra I teacher from the Santa Rosa school district in Florida teach a lesson using all new Discovery Education Math Techbook.
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