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The Art of Naming: Boys Names from Literature

The Art of Naming: Boys Names from Literature | English Literature | Scoop.it
If you've ever studied literature in college or simply love to read, you may appreciate this list! Feel free to add more names to it!

Via Clare
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Clare's curator insight, December 26, 2013 7:06 AM

Do any of these names remind you of favourite characters?  I'm loving the picture here: just imagine that old book smell, mmmm...

cop thomas's curator insight, February 22, 2015 5:06 AM

ik vond het eerder grappig dan echt iets wat over literatuur gaat, maar nu zie je wel wat een goed boek bijvoorbeeld wel niet kan doen. Als je een goed boek gelezen hebt, blijft die natuurlijk wel iets beter zitten, of je geraakt er door geobserdeert. Al denk ik wel als ik een mooie naam in een boek tegenkom, dat ik mezelf ook wel zou betrappen om later ook de naam van in het boek aan m'n kind te geven, wat blijkbaar vele ouders doen.  

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Was ‘Frankenstein’ Really About Childbirth?

Was ‘Frankenstein’ Really About Childbirth? | English Literature | Scoop.it

The last notes that Wollstonecraft wrote to Godwin are included in the exhibition“Shelley’s Ghost: The Afterlife of a Poet,” which began last year at the Bodleian Library in Oxford and has now come to the New York Public Library. On display are numerous artifacts both personal and literary from the lives of the Shelleys, including manuscript pages from the notebook in which Mary wrote Frankenstein (with editing in the margins by her husband), which have never before been shown publicly in the United States. But it was Wollstonecraft’s scribbled note, in which she referred to her baby as “the animal”— the same word that the scientist in Frankenstein would use to describe his own notorious creation—that gave me pause. Could the novel—commonly understood as a fable of masculine reproduction, in which a man creates life asexually—also be a story about pregnancy?


Via Ricardo Lourenço
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Edgar Allan Poe, Illustrated

Edgar Allan Poe, Illustrated | English Literature | Scoop.it

Literature and the visual arts have fed off of each other for as long as the two have existed. It should be no surprise to anyone reading this that the evocative imagery of the works of Edgar Allan Poe have been complemented with illustrations numerous times in their publication history.


Via Ricardo Lourenço
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Hugo Gonzalez's curator insight, March 20, 2014 1:11 PM

When it comes to writing, reading old literature from these deceases writer really helps.  It may be old but it can teach a writer a thing or two about making a paper more fascinating.  It can create a imagery if the words are visual instead of just spoken.

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Postcolonial and Postimperial Literature: An Overview | ELT

Postcolonial and Postimperial Literature: An Overview | ELT | English Literature | Scoop.it

Via Monica Mirza
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Monica Mirza's curator insight, March 22, 2013 12:23 PM

Onlist S. Bonfils (a colleague) has just reminded us of "Things fall apart" as its Nigerian author -Chinua Achebe- has died (the novel's considered the archetype of the African novel in English) .

Should you plan to deal with the novel, its author and/or dwell in the African literature domain... let me suggest you ' www.postcolonialweb.org ', a website I discovered a while ago. It covers"Contemporary postcolonial and postimperial literature in English" and contains loads of relevant analyses and information to help you study them with your students.

Hope it'll be of some use :-)

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Wide Open Fear: Australian Horror and Gothic Fiction

Wide Open Fear: Australian Horror and Gothic Fiction | English Literature | Scoop.it

In her introduction to Australis Imaginarium (2010), Tehani Wessely succinctly summarises an idea that has become something of a truism when it comes to discussing horror and dark fantasy stories with Australian settings:

There’s simply something about the vastness of this land and the many weird, wild and dangerous creatures that populate it that lends itself to terrifying tales.


Via Ricardo Lourenço
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

Via Shona Whyte
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Shona Whyte's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:46 AM

Nice justification of literature, liberal arts, pitched beautifully for anglophone teens, but just about right for undergrad second language speakers, IMO.

Eion_D's curator insight, March 30, 2014 6:44 AM

Hopefully more engaging than the last post, John Green has created a series of Crash Course videos based around Literature. This is the first, it links in to our discussions about thinking critically, and why it's so important to be able to delve deeper. Finding meaning, creating an analysis of a text shouldn’t be a nightmare; it should give you the opportunity to view the world differently. So with that in mind, and having watched the video, I want you to sit down and have a think about the text Romeo & Juliet, before answering these two questions:

            Using the comments section, create for me, a list of the things you have learnt from the play. It's pretty simple, just a list of information, literary concepts, feelings or understandings you have gained from reading the play. Why? Because reflecting on what we've learnt from a text will help us move forward in understanding ourselves and how we can communicate those changes with others. By doing it together, with everyone's input, we can create a storyboard of our learned experiences as a group.

            Pick a character from the play (this exercise may help, if you're struggling to build the above list). Choose the character you thought you would most hate. Tell me why you thought they would be loathsome. And then as clearly and concisely as you can, explain why you were surprised that you didn't hate them at all. What experiences changed your mind? Were they persuasive speakers? Did their actions redeem themselves in your eyes? What emotion, or lived experience caused you to empathise with them, despite how much you wanted to hate them?

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English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling

English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling | English Literature | Scoop.it
What have been the hinge points in the evolution of Anglo-American literature? Here's a provisional, partisan list

Via O Segrel Do Penedo
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Peta-Dannielle Adda's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:31 AM

By drawing the students' attention to changing literature throughout time, they will look into how the first authors recorded works and how technology has changed how people produce, publish and distribute literary works now and in the future.

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The Motivation Equation - Designing Lessons that Set Kids' Minds on Fire

The Motivation Equation - Designing Lessons that Set Kids' Minds on Fire | English Literature | Scoop.it

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 31, 2013 3:26 PM

A wonderful ebook. A FREE ebook. A very cleverly designed ebook. A great ebook.

 

Many insights on motivation and learning, compellingly presented in a media-enriched format. Definitely worth spending time on this one!

Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 31, 2013 3:29 PM

Fascinating example of a very rich way to publish material. Great idea for student work as an alternative to powerpoints and prezis.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM

We have great  motiavions that impact oiur behavior,