Clinical Excellence and Social Media
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Clinical Excellence and Social Media
Recipe: Add Communication, Humanism and Knowledge to Health Professionals. Simmer on Social Media. Stir with a Bit of Boring Academia. Garnish with Evidence.
Curated by Dr John Weiner
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How social media helped my PhD : (you can substitute school project/undergrad course/hobby/whatever)

How social media helped my PhD : (you can substitute school project/undergrad course/hobby/whatever) | Clinical Excellence and Social Media | Scoop.it
It's been about a year since I launched into the blogo- and twitterspheres. So now I feel qualified to list the ways it's been awesome for my PhD. Developing a writing culture Blogging feels a litt...
Dr John Weiner's insight:

There are great resources at the end of this post to steer you in the right direction. Send/email to that friend of yours who is hesitating in getting involved in social media at a professional level.

Remember - Do it for yourself. Do it with excellence. You will then help others. 

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Deborah Verran's comment, August 11, 2013 5:24 AM
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Medicine, Social Media and Clinical Excellence

Medicine, Social Media and Clinical Excellence | Clinical Excellence and Social Media | Scoop.it
The brouhaha about doctors and social media continues.

caption id= align=alignnone width=531 The Doctor by English social realist painter Luke Fildes, 1891. It was inspired by the death of his own
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Will #MOOCs Destroy Academia?

Will #MOOCs Destroy Academia? | Clinical Excellence and Social Media | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:34 PM

Early rhetoric about the educational value of MOOCs was quite lofty, talking about the goal of reaching the quality of individual tutoring, but it is difficult to reconcile such rhetoric with massiveness as an essential feature of MOOCs. A more honest comment from one of the early MOOC pioneers was: "We were tired of delivering the same lectures year after year, often to a half-empty classroom because our classes were being videotaped." In fact, the absence of serious pedagogy in MOOCs is rather striking, their essential feature being short, unsophisticated video chunks, interleaved with online quizzes, and accompanied by social networking.

The bitter truth, however, is that academic pedagogy has never been very good. It is well established that a professorial soliloquy is an ineffective way of teaching. We do know what works and what does not work when it comes to teaching. Much has been written in the last few years about "active learning," "peer learning," "flipping the lecture," and the like, yet much of academic teaching still consists of professors monologuing to large classes. We could undoubtedly improve our teaching, but MOOCs are not the answer to our pedagogical shortcomings.

Dr John Weiner's curator insight, August 10, 2013 9:03 PM

I'm in the middle of my first MOOC (Statistics in Medicine, Stanford) so this learned piece is pertinent. I am finding the MOOC wonderful, frustrating, comprehensive, difficult, awe-inspiring, all of the above. My financial position allows me to get help from other sources, do other courses, but those options are denied to many in our world. Which is why MOOCs will not destroy academia, but morph into an indispensible academic tool.

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Will #MOOCs Destroy Academia?

Will #MOOCs Destroy Academia? | Clinical Excellence and Social Media | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Dr John Weiner
Dr John Weiner's insight:

I'm in the middle of my first MOOC (Statistics in Medicine, Stanford) so this learned piece is pertinent. I am finding the MOOC wonderful, frustrating, comprehensive, difficult, awe-inspiring, all of the above. My financial position allows me to get help from other sources, do other courses, but those options are denied to many in our world. Which is why MOOCs will not destroy academia, but morph into an indispensible academic tool.

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:34 PM

Early rhetoric about the educational value of MOOCs was quite lofty, talking about the goal of reaching the quality of individual tutoring, but it is difficult to reconcile such rhetoric with massiveness as an essential feature of MOOCs. A more honest comment from one of the early MOOC pioneers was: "We were tired of delivering the same lectures year after year, often to a half-empty classroom because our classes were being videotaped." In fact, the absence of serious pedagogy in MOOCs is rather striking, their essential feature being short, unsophisticated video chunks, interleaved with online quizzes, and accompanied by social networking.

The bitter truth, however, is that academic pedagogy has never been very good. It is well established that a professorial soliloquy is an ineffective way of teaching. We do know what works and what does not work when it comes to teaching. Much has been written in the last few years about "active learning," "peer learning," "flipping the lecture," and the like, yet much of academic teaching still consists of professors monologuing to large classes. We could undoubtedly improve our teaching, but MOOCs are not the answer to our pedagogical shortcomings.

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The A to Z of Social Media for Academia

The A to Z of Social Media for Academia | Clinical Excellence and Social Media | Scoop.it
This post accompanies the newly established ‘Social Media News’ email list for academics and university support staff, sharing info about the latest platforms for use by academics in th...

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 26, 2013 11:17 AM

Nice list. Found too many new things we'll have to look at now.

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The illustrated guide to a Ph.D. - Matt Might

The illustrated guide to a Ph.D. - Matt Might | Clinical Excellence and Social Media | Scoop.it
The illustrated guide to a Ph.D. Every fall, I explain to a fresh batch of Ph.D. students what a Ph.D. is. It's hard to describe it in words. So, I use pictures. Read below for the illustrated guide to a Ph.D.
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