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Gallery: How networks help us understand the world | ideas.ted.com

Gallery: How networks help us understand the world | ideas.ted.com | Education | Scoop.it
Data visualization expert Manuel Lima shares some of his favorite graphics showing how the network is a powerful way to reflect the world.
Via Emre Erdogan
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The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself

The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself | Education | Scoop.it
Not only can the brain learn new tricks, but it can also change its structure and function--even in old age
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Meritocracy and Topocracy of Networks - Cesar Hidalgo - YouTube

https://youtu.be/CTJ8TAMv3sk”;
Via ukituki, Emre Erdogan
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Nudge nudge, think think

Nudge nudge, think think | Education | Scoop.it
“ “FREAKONOMICS” was the book that made the public believe the dismal science has something interesting to say about how people act in the real world. But “Nudge” was the one that got policy wonks excited.”
Via Pat Brenner, Emre Erdogan
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Maintaining a Cognitive Map in Darkness: The Need to Fuse Boundary Knowledge with Path Integration

Maintaining a Cognitive Map in Darkness: The Need to Fuse Boundary Knowledge with Path Integration | Education | Scoop.it

Spatial navigation requires the processing of complex, disparate and often ambiguous sensory data. The neurocomputations underpinning this vital ability remain poorly understood. Controversy remains as to whether multimodal sensory information must be combined into a unified representation, consistent with Tolman's “cognitive map”, or whether differential activation of independent navigation modules suffice to explain observed navigation behaviour. Here we demonstrate that key neural correlates of spatial navigation in darkness cannot be explained if the path integration system acted independently of boundary (landmark) information. In vivo recordings demonstrate that the rodent head direction (HD) system becomes unstable within three minutes without vision. In contrast, rodents maintain stable place fields and grid fields for over half an hour without vision.

 

Using a simple HD error model, we show analytically that idiothetic path integration (iPI) alone cannot be used to maintain any stable place representation beyond two to three minutes. We then use a measure of place stability based on information theoretic principles to prove that featureless boundaries alone cannot be used to improve localization above chance level. Having shown that neither iPI nor boundaries alone are sufficient, we then address the question of whether their combination is sufficient and – we conjecture – necessary to maintain place stability for prolonged periods without vision. We addressed this question in simulations and robot experiments using a navigation model comprising of a particle filter and boundary map. The model replicates published experimental results on place field and grid field stability without vision, and makes testable predictions including place field splitting and grid field rescaling if the true arena geometry differs from the acquired boundary map. We discuss our findings in light of current theories of animal navigation and neuronal computation, and elaborate on their implications and significance for the design, analysis and interpretation of experiments.


Via Ashish Umre, Marissa Saunders
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Updating Beliefs when Evidence is Open to Interpretation: Implications for Bias and Polarization | Roland G. Fryer, Jr.

Roland G. Fryer J, Harms P, Jackson MO. Updating Beliefs when Evidence is Open to Interpretation: Implications for Bias and Polarization. Working Paper.
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Viewpoint: Behavioural economics: a model of thinking | Market Research Society

Viewpoint: Behavioural economics: a model of thinking | Market Research Society | Education | Scoop.it

As behavioural economics has become more embedded in the world of research, so too have the questions that are asked of it. It no longer remains in the domain of behaviour change projects in the public sector and financial services, and there is certainly little of the discussion around its relevance to us as market research practitioners that was around even 18 months ago.

There’s lots of talk of BE as a methodology or spawning new methodologies - auto-ethnography, contextual research, System One ad testing, the blink test, and so on. But I’d propose that it’s about a holistic approach, a way of thinking that transcends every project and every aspect of a project regardless of sector or even of brief. BE has come of age, it needs to be thought of as a model of thinking rather than a series of methods and tools.

Daniel Kahneman said of BE, that ‘humans are to thinking as cats are to swimming’. In other words, we can do it if we really have to … but mostly we don’t. It is simply too effortful to do it all the time. And this is a generic issue, not one that is confined to certain types of brief.

One of the ways that we know when something has real power and relevance is to look at how it manifests in our everyday language. This is certainly the case in BE, and what’s more, being more conscious of our own language will help us spot biases at play in our own lives, giving us valuable clues as to how to take them into account in a research and marketing context.

So, let’s take a closer look at the types of language we tend to bump into on a daily basis, and what they really mean.


Via Alessandro Cerboni, Emre Erdogan
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, November 28, 2015 2:10 AM


"Daniel Kahneman said of BE, that ‘humans are to thinking as cats are to swimming’. In other words, we can do it if we really have to … but mostly we don’t. It is simply too effortful to do it all the time..." - Very interesting to coaches, trainers, etc. too...

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Network model for tracking Twitter memes sheds light on information spreading in the brain

Network model for tracking Twitter memes sheds light on information spreading in the brain | Education | Scoop.it
An international team of researchers from Indiana University and Switzerland is using data mapping methods created to track the spread of information on so ...

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'Geography of Hate' maps racism and homophobia on Twitter

'Geography of Hate' maps racism and homophobia on Twitter | Education | Scoop.it

Twitter, even more than many other social media tools, can feel disconnected from the real world. But a group of students and professors at research site Floating Sheep have built a comprehensive map of some of Twitter's most distasteful content: the racist, homophobic, or ableist slurs that can proliferate online. Called Geography of Hate, the interactive map charts ten relatively common slurs across the continental US, either by general category or individually. Looking at the whole country, you'll often see a mass of red or what the map's creators call a "blue smog of hate." Zooming in, however, patches appear over individual regions or cities; some may be predictable, while others are not.


Via Complexity Digest, Marissa Saunders
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Book Review – Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies

Book Review – Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies | Education | Scoop.it

By K. Walsh

 

"Teacher Michele Pacansky-Brock has written an excellent guide to bringing the teaching paradigm into the current century, in a way that embraces the perspective of students (of all ages) and has been proved effective time and time again.

"I could hardly envision a better introduction to using emerging technologies in the classroom in a single self-contained resource. While this book recounts a personal journey, it also very well organized, and provides structured guidance. These experienced insights can help guide any educator through the maze of Internet tools, to discover many ways in which they can facilitate a fundamental shift in student engagement and learning.

 

"While recovering from open-heart surgery in 2006, Instructor Michelle Pacansky-Brock started listening to educational podcasts during frequent walks, and was amazed at how much she learned from these early “Web 2.0” tools adopters and thought-leaders. She was inspired to experiment with the use of podcasts in her online course and this gradually led down the road to a wide variety of web-based tools and a learning journey of her own that resulted in significant changes to how she teaches today. The ultimate motivation behind these changes was the impact if had on the success of the students in her classes.

 

"Along the way, Pacansky-Brock was awarded a Sloan-C Excellence in Online Teaching Award, but far more meaningful was the positive feedback from many students whose learning experiences were transformed through participation in her classes. As a higher education teacher she encounters students of all ages and has found that with some personalized attention even older students who were intimidated by technology could ultimately embrace these tools and walk away proud of their new found skills."


Via Jim Lerman
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Andrew Blanco's curator insight, February 5, 2015 11:17 AM

book on how to merge technology for teachers in need