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Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from Educational Technology News
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Badges vs. curiosity: What should motivate students?

Badges vs. curiosity: What should motivate students? | education | Scoop.it

"Digital badges can be seen as a great motivator or a way to cheapen education. Where are you on the extrinsic/intrinsic motivation spectrum?"


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Alex Enkerli's curator insight, November 19, 2014 3:23 PM

Adding a personal touch to the badges and motivation issue. 

Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from Educational Technology News
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Teaching kids to be private in a public world: Is it possible?

Teaching kids to be private in a public world: Is it possible? | education | Scoop.it

"If privacy is about having control over the flow of information and the control you have within the contextual settings, then certainly it would seem a life lived immersed in the online world and within social networks, suggests that privacy is compromised."


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Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Lives on the Boundary: Education and Inequality | Mike Rose | Truthdig.com

Lives on the Boundary: Education and Inequality | Mike Rose | Truthdig.com | education | Scoop.it

For almost 35 years, I’ve been writing about people who have had a hard time of it in school, and this writing has led me to examine our definition of intelligence and measures of academic achievement, the relation of social class and inequality to achievement, and the very purpose of education in a democratic society.


These issues are intimate ones for me. I did well enough in school in the elementary grades, but, as is the case with so many kids, I became increasingly disengaged and lackluster as I moved toward and through high school. I survived because I could read well, though I wasn’t an avid reader except for a science fiction jag around the 6th grade. And I could write tolerably well, albeit with a smattering of fragments and run-on sentences.


But I never got engaged with science or social studies, and math was an indecipherable puzzle to me—as was the diagramming of sentences, a big deal in my middle grades. My father was chronically ill, and my mother worked double shifts as a waitress to keep us afloat. The sadness and hardship in our house took its toll on school as well.


Then in an amazing stroke of luck, as a high school senior I landed in an English class taught by a young man named John McFarland who loved books and had the fire in his belly to teach. I’d had good teachers before, to be sure, but this guy somehow caught my fancy, and I worked like crazy to do well in his class.

Though my parents wanted me to go to college and held it up as an ideal, they didn’t know what I needed to do to get there—my mother had a 6th grade education, my father much less. Because I never got into big trouble in school, my parents had no indication that I was slowly going nowhere.


It was Mr. McFarland who helped me get into a local college as a probationary student (all those crummy grades before his class didn’t help) and after stumbling a few times during my freshman year, I found my way and would go on to teach and eventually do research on students who also were having difficulties in school.


I wrote about my educational journey and about the many people I’ve taught who have, in some way, had a checkered history in the classroom. A good number of them were, like me, from working-class backgrounds: immigrant children, inner-city kids, veterans wanting to give school a second chance.


The book is titled “Lives on the Boundary: The Struggles and Achievements of America’s Educationally Underprepared,” and this fall marked the 25th anniversary of its publication.


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from #USFCA
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"A food truck kind of day" to start off International Education Week

"A food truck kind of day" to start off International Education Week | education | Scoop.it

"It's a Foodtruck kind of day! #usfca #smotheredsf #bellyfull"


[via stepheim]


International Education Week Events: http://bit.ly/1lWphts





Via University of San Francisco
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Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from Technology to Teach
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7 Strategies to Help Students Generate Creative Ideas ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

7 Strategies to Help Students Generate Creative Ideas ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | education | Scoop.it

Via Amy Burns
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Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from Educational Technology News
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Online Learning Must Be Collaborative and Social

Online Learning Must Be Collaborative and Social | education | Scoop.it

"An annual report by The Open University said the current key challenge for education specialists is to engage thousands of learners in productive discussions while learning in a collaborative, online environment."


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Empowerment's curator insight, February 23, 2015 6:50 AM

There is a strong trend of discovery in learning organizations

 

Richard Samson's curator insight, February 23, 2015 7:58 AM

OU ahead of the curve!

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 24, 2015 3:34 PM

C'est toujours intéressant de suivre l'Open University dans ses opinions sur la formation.

Rescooped by chenisia rozzelle from Educational Technology News
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Beyond the MOOC Model: Changing Educational Paradigms

Beyond the MOOC Model: Changing Educational Paradigms | education | Scoop.it

"Four trends – MOOC-based degrees, competency-based education, the formalization of learning, and regulatory reform – are shifting educational practice away from core tenets of traditional education, indicating not a transient phenomenon but rather a fundamental change to the status quo."


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