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The Key to Your School's Success Is Also Terrifying to Most Principals

The Key to Your School's Success Is Also Terrifying to Most Principals | Education | Scoop.it
Imagine giving your employees a real say in how your organization is run. Think about it: They show up to work, voice their opinions, express their concerns, toss around their ideas, and...get this--management says "you're right."

If that sounds like a scene from a badly scripted movie, think again. Giving employees "voice" has long been recognized as a key driver of leadership trust and organizational effectiveness.

Via Mel Riddile
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Professional learning communities bring benefits for teachers, students

Professional learning communities bring benefits for teachers, students | Education | Scoop.it

"Working teachers rarely have an opportunity to see their colleagues in action. They are either teaching or preparing for their next classes and observation time is minimal or nonexistent. That’s a big reason why Gamble Rogers Middle School in northeastern Florida became a professional learning community."


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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


Via Mel Riddile
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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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How America celebrates the 4th of July: The numbers

How America celebrates the 4th of July: The numbers | Education | Scoop.it

American flag? Check. Hot dogs? Check. Fireworks? Triple check.


Fourth of July can’t be celebrated without seeing red, white and blue everywhere. Probably the most important Fourth of July feature is the U.S. flag.


- 63.9% of people own a U.S. flag


- $4.4 million was spent on imports of U.S. flag, the vast majority of which came from China ($4.3 million).


There is $6.77 billion in planned spending on Fourth of July food, and it just so happens that July is National Hot Dog Month. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council says that out of an estimated 20 billion hot dogs consumed by Americans each year, 155 million are consumed on July 4....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 4, 2016 1:45 AM

Fourth of July by the numbers add up to a big celebration.

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To do better in school, kids should exercise their bodies as well as their brains, experts say | #Sports #EdPhys 

To do better in school, kids should exercise their bodies as well as their brains, experts say | #Sports #EdPhys  | Education | Scoop.it

Attention parents: If you’d like to see your kids do better in school, have them close their books, set down their pencils and go outside to play.

That’s the latest advice from an international group of experts who studied the value of exercise in school-age kids.

“Physical activity before, during and after school promotes scholastic performance in children and youth,” according to a new consensus statement published Monday in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

What’s more, exercise and fitness “are beneficial to brain structure, brain function and cognition,” the experts concluded.

See the most-read stories in Science this hour »

The group of 24 researchers from the United States, Canada and Europe came up with this advice after poring over the latest scientific and medical research on the benefits of exercise in kids ages 6 to 18. The experts, from a variety of disciplines, gathered in Copenhagen this spring to assess the value of all kinds of exercise, including recess and physical education classes in school, organized youth sports leagues and old-fashioned outdoor play.

Though all of these activities take kids out of the classroom or away from their homework, they are still a good investment in academic achievement, the consensus statement says. Even a single break for moderate-intensity exercise can boost “brain function, cognition and scholastic performance,” according to the statement.

The benefits also extend to the psychological and social realm, the experts wrote. Exercise will clear their heads, help them make friends, and help them feel more confident around their peers as well as coaches and other adults.

Any kind of exercise is valuable, but goal-oriented activities provide extra benefits, the experts found. Among other things, they promote “life skills” and “core values” like respect and social responsibility, they wrote in the statement.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/01/10/how-to-to-incorporate-ict-within-physical-education/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 28, 2016 6:19 PM

Attention parents: If you’d like to see your kids do better in school, have them close their books, set down their pencils and go outside to play.

That’s the latest advice from an international group of experts who studied the value of exercise in school-age kids.

“Physical activity before, during and after school promotes scholastic performance in children and youth,” according to a new consensus statement published Monday in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

What’s more, exercise and fitness “are beneficial to brain structure, brain function and cognition,” the experts concluded.

See the most-read stories in Science this hour »

The group of 24 researchers from the United States, Canada and Europe came up with this advice after poring over the latest scientific and medical research on the benefits of exercise in kids ages 6 to 18. The experts, from a variety of disciplines, gathered in Copenhagen this spring to assess the value of all kinds of exercise, including recess and physical education classes in school, organized youth sports leagues and old-fashioned outdoor play.

Though all of these activities take kids out of the classroom or away from their homework, they are still a good investment in academic achievement, the consensus statement says. Even a single break for moderate-intensity exercise can boost “brain function, cognition and scholastic performance,” according to the statement.

The benefits also extend to the psychological and social realm, the experts wrote. Exercise will clear their heads, help them make friends, and help them feel more confident around their peers as well as coaches and other adults.

Any kind of exercise is valuable, but goal-oriented activities provide extra benefits, the experts found. Among other things, they promote “life skills” and “core values” like respect and social responsibility, they wrote in the statement.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/01/10/how-to-to-incorporate-ict-within-physical-education/

 

 

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, June 28, 2016 6:20 PM
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Rescooped by Andy Fetchik from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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How to Search on Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips

How to Search on Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips | Education | Scoop.it

If you’re like me, you probably use Google many times a day. But chances are, unless you're a technology geek, you probably still use Google in its simplest form. If your current use of Google is limited to typing in a few words and changing your query until you find what you’re looking for, then I’m here to tell you that there’s a better way -- and it’s not hard to learn.


On the other hand, even if you are a technology geek and can use Google like the best of them already, I still suggest you bookmark this article of advanced Google search tips. Then, you’ll then have the tips on hand when you're ready to pull your hair out in frustration watching a neophyte repeatedly type in basic queries in a desperate attempt to find something.


The following advanced Google search tips are based on my own experience and things that I actually find useful. I’ve kept the descriptions of the search tips intentionally terse, as you’re likely to grasp most of these simply by looking at the example from Google anyway....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 28, 2016 12:22 PM

Here's an oldie but goodie HubSpot post with 31 advanced search tips for conducting better Google searches so you can get to your results faster.

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 28, 2016 2:19 PM

Here's an oldie but goodie HubSpot post with 31 advanced search tips for conducting better Google searches so you can get to your results faster.

 
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Want to Be a Successful Leader? Research Says Practice These 6 Things Daily

Bosses and HR Execs are now catching on to the critical link between great leadership and healthy work cultures. And research says it all comes down to six servant-leadership behaviors.

Via Anne Leong
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Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:41 AM

Thank you Lord God for you defining success in each and every individuals life. You created each person for a different reason equipped for the plan and level of success that is not to be measured in envy or jealousy of another as you Lord God have no little i's. or big U' S Lord God have mercy as we thank you Lord God for helping us all be effective at that which is given to us to do individually and collectively together in Jesus name Amen

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


Via Mel Riddile
Andy Fetchik's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


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Beth Crisafulli Hofer's comment, January 10, 2016 6:54 PM
I'm going to add some of these to our framework!
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning

How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning | Education | Scoop.it
More schools are transforming their traditional libraries into innovative makerspaces, giving students the chance to experiment and grow in new and exciting ways.
Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Andy Fetchik's insight:
A great explanation of how maker spaces in libraries transform them from content consumption spaces to content creation spaces. Not only does this idea strengthen STEM initiatives but the library ties all curricular areas together through storytelling, production, research, and independent self-selection driven by student interests. This is yet another reason why a certified professional library/information specialist is imperative in every school!
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Susan Kluger's curator insight, March 15, 2016 5:18 PM
A great explanation of how maker spaces in libraries transform them from content consumption spaces to content creation spaces. Not only does this idea strengthen STEM initiatives but the library ties all curricular areas together through storytelling, production, research, and independent self-selection driven by student interests. This is yet another reason why a certified professional library/information specialist is imperative in every school!
Steven Hill's curator insight, March 15, 2016 5:54 PM
A great explanation of how maker spaces in libraries transform them from content consumption spaces to content creation spaces. Not only does this idea strengthen STEM initiatives but the library ties all curricular areas together through storytelling, production, research, and independent self-selection driven by student interests. This is yet another reason why a certified professional library/information specialist is imperative in every school!
Sandy Bernstein's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:01 AM
A great explanation of how maker spaces in libraries transform them from content consumption spaces to content creation spaces. Not only does this idea strengthen STEM initiatives but the library ties all curricular areas together through storytelling, production, research, and independent self-selection driven by student interests. This is yet another reason why a certified professional library/information specialist is imperative in every school!
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Far higher share of students are passing at least one AP test during high school

Far higher share of students are passing at least one AP test during high school | Education | Scoop.it
Maryland leads the nation in the portion of its graduates from the Class of 2015 who earned a 3 or better on at least one Advanced Placement exam. Virginia was 6th in the country.

Via Mel Riddile
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Jennifer Vineyard's curator insight, February 24, 2016 2:08 PM

Where will we be in 2020?

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Stop Humiliating Teachers

Stop Humiliating Teachers | Education | Scoop.it

Everyone celebrates his or her personal memory of individual teachers, yet, as a culture, we snap at the run-down heels of the profession. The education reporter Dana Goldstein, in her book “The Teacher Wars,” published in 2014, looks at American history and describes a recurring situation of what she calls “moral panic”—the tendency, when there’s an economic or social crisis, to lay blame on public-school teachers. They must have created the crisis, the logic goes, by failing to educate the young.


Via Patti Kinney
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How One District Redefined Teacher Evaluations with ‘Self Directed Growth Plans’ (EdSurge News)

How One District Redefined Teacher Evaluations with ‘Self Directed Growth Plans’ (EdSurge News) | Education | Scoop.it

The National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future indicates that more than fifty percent of those entering the profession will leave within the first three to five years.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 29, 2016 2:21 PM

The National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future indicates that more than fifty percent of those entering the profession will leave within the first three to five years.


Nine years ago, the Harrington Park School District in New Jersey started down a path of reevaluation and self reflection, when we realized that we were in danger of losing teachers. We needed to “reevaluate the evaluation”—to figure out how we could bring teachers together over evaluation, as opposed to driving them apart.

The answer? The Self-Directed Growth Plan (SDGP)—an approach to teacher evaluation and student growth measurement that allows for a continual state of growth and change that effective teachers desire to gain.


The scope of future plans for the SDGP process is vast and unlimited, and as we look to the future, we see a possible path for the SDGPs to fit into our work with recertification and micro-credentials. For us, teacher evaluation and training isn’t about seat-time—it’s about learning and competencies.


But even beyond teacher training, the SDGP’s true value is in the way it encourages collaboration—a key to promoting student growth and achievement. With the SDGP model, we are able to measure effectiveness through essential questions that can be seen almost immediately. At Harrington, we’ve done away with mundane and redundant evaluations that add to existing isolation and anxiety of educators.


Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, January 30, 2016 5:24 AM

Meten wat we aanleren, durven experimenteren en daardoor samen (blijven) groeien in het vak. Het kan blijkbaar.

Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:55 AM

There is a way. Might not be the way for every District but it worked for theirs. Truth be told can't say it want work because as Mrs Vester Lyons always said "there is no fail if you never try"! 

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Where did it all go?

Where did it all go? | Education | Scoop.it
Information the brain chooses to “keep” first enters into our short-term memory (STM). However, our STM can only serve as a staging area for the next stage of retention, as it is limited in its ability to hold much information (only about seven independent items at one time) and for much time (approximately half a minute). It’s like our STM is a combined Twitter-Snapchat app that will hold and then auto-delete small amounts of content unless moved to a more permanent storage area.
That’s where our long-term memory (LTM) comes in. LTM is like our internal hard drive, offering long-term memory and storage in various parts of the brain’s cortex. If properly encoded, the information can remain for a lifetime. So what can teachers do to ensure that information gets properly stored and encoded by their students and that it can be properly retrieved as needed?

Via Mel Riddile
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Harvard Study Reveals Shocking Reason Why Girls Aren't Learning to be Leaders

Harvard Study Reveals Shocking Reason Why Girls Aren't Learning to be Leaders | Education | Scoop.it
For the last few decades, women have been breaking professional barriers. But a new report by Harvard’s Educational School reveals there’s a hidden barrier teen girls are running up against.
“Girls are facing biases from many sources, from teen boys, from some parents, and they are facing biases...

Via Susie Sisson
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Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 5:58 AM

Lord God we thank you for this I format I on being shared we ask you Lord God to bless each and every person and their businesses and/or corporations for sharing it also in the manner and/or way they have need of. Let the information spread thru out the world and be used as a resource of help to all that need be. In Jesus name we decree  an declare it is so. Thank youlord God for not only hearing but answering this prayer 

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Report: 6 million students miss too much school

Report: 6 million students miss too much school | Education | Scoop.it
More than 6 million students—representing 13 percent of the K12 population—missed at least 15 days of school in 2013-14, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis from the U.S. Department of Education.

“Every district has attendance data, but most haven’t been calculating chronic absence,” says Hedy Nai-Lin Chang, executive director of Attendance Works, a national initiative to increase student achievement by increasing attendance. “If you’re looking at access and equity in schools—whether or not kids are in school so they have a chance to learn—is a huge indicator of whether we’re creating equal opportunities.”

Via Mel Riddile
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Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:06 AM

Bless all that has and/or will share this post especially the original individual who shared the information . Lord God cover this persons and all those who share social media pages and electronic equipment which they gain access to the social media in the blood of Jesus and destroy all the demonic spirits that maybe is or will attack those individuals in any way including their personal belongings. Lef no weapon formed against them prosper.

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


Via Mel Riddile
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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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The Back Story: How the Star-Spangled Lyrics Were Born

The Back Story: How the Star-Spangled Lyrics Were Born | Education | Scoop.it
What was a lawyer like Francis Scott Key—who wrote the words to America's national anthem—doing watching a battle anyway?

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 30, 2016 11:45 AM

In the US, most of us know that Francis Scott Key wrote the lyrics to our national anthem, the Star Spangled Banner, while watching the shelling of Ft. McHenry.

 

But did you know how Key got to be there in the first place? It's quite a story!

 

Enjoy and have a happy 4th of July holiday everyone!

Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:13 AM

Order God we tha k you for the sharing of this information and its sharers Lord God bless them even the more those we know and even those we don't know. Lord send your nointing to block all the fiery darts of the those that my try to stop the info from being shared by your increase by supernatural divine intervention as only you Lord God can in Jesus name Thank you heavenly Father Amen

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.


Via Mel Riddile
more...
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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France Could Ban Emails After Work Hours

France Could Ban Emails After Work Hours | Education | Scoop.it

France is one step closer to becoming the first country to set a curfew for email, after a bill banning companies with 50 or more employees from sending emails after work hours recently passed the French lower parliament.

The bill’s next destination is the French Senate, and if passed, it will be sent back to the National Assembly to become law. It would require businesses to define the work hours in which email can or cannot be sent, and is intended to reduce workplace stress.

Studies point to email as a major headache for consumers, with reports correlating checking email with negative health consequences....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Barbra muzata's curator insight, May 17, 2016 4:01 AM
Your thoughts? I think the onus rests with the individual.
Don Curtin's curator insight, May 17, 2016 5:59 AM
Surely you can train yourself to check your emails once a day.Unless I am waiting for something especially I only check once or twice a day.
Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:31 AM

Lord God you know. Lord God you know why the timing of emails sent re being used in negative manner and for others gain Lord God get In the midst and destroy these bondages for the weapons of warfare are not carnal Lord God we wrestle not against flesh and blood but wickednesses and rulers of darkness in high places that come to enslave your people and control and manipulate our lives but Lord God you are for us a and you are more than the whole world against us. We are not conformed to man plans or evilness but transformed thru and by you Lord God and we thank you for keeping each and every one of us in Jesus name Thank you Lord God.

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10 Signs You Really Are a Leader (and Might Not Know It)

10 Signs You Really Are a Leader (and Might Not Know It) | Education | Scoop.it
Many times people who influence us the most aren't even aware they are leading us.

Via Anne Leong
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Why Become a Leader?

A leader is not necessarily someone of exceptional intelligence or with an ultra-charismatic personality. A leader is someone who sees a problem or lacking, realizes that they are the only one who can fix it, and takes responsibility for doing so.

A leader takes a tough situation and does their best to make good out of it.

Via Don Dea
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What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like | Education | Scoop.it
Teaching experts Annette Breaux & Todd Whitaker contrast the characteristics of effective and ineffective classrooms with two simple but compelling bullet lists

Via Patti Kinney
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Patty Niebauer's curator insight, March 12, 2016 10:46 AM
I'm so happy to see this kind of classroom !
Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:46 AM

Lord God bless the effective teachers and help those who are not to be effective and if they choose not to do so demove them out of the way in Jesus name, help all the children learn to their greatest potential of doing so in the name of Jesus Amen Amen Amen Thank you Jesus

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What Inspires You?

www.EscapeTheCubicle.co

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Linda Tapp's curator insight, February 17, 2016 9:24 AM

A little motivation is good for everyone

 

Sherry Bonelli's curator insight, February 23, 2016 10:56 PM

What inspires you?

Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, April 24, 2017 6:49 AM

Don't let it break you but make you an answer to the problem instead.

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How To Give Negative Feedback Without Being A Jerk

How To Give Negative Feedback Without Being A Jerk | Education | Scoop.it

“Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes.

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Spaced repetition: a hack to make your brain store information

Spaced repetition: a hack to make your brain store information | Education | Scoop.it
Using spaced repetition as a study technique is effective because you are deliberately hacking the way your brain works

Via Mel Riddile
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