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Rescooped by claude from Startup Revolution
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The Power of Social Lists Startup Trello Helps You Find Out

The Power of Social Lists Startup Trello Helps You Find Out | Education! | Scoop.it
Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards.

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:42 PM

Any project manager knows lists are powerful. Trello takes your, "Milk, Bread and Butter," list to a new space. Could you manage a multi-dimensional project with more than about 5 team members with Trello? Maybe.

The Interface is clean and easier than 37 Signals (and lots easier than Microsoft Project and other highly intricate project management tools). The power of the social list could create a new dimension to project management.

Imagine you publish your task lists with the challenge to have the sentient crowd come help solidify your thinking. Project management with the help of poeple who've gone there before could save TIME and MONEY.

Could be cool :).

Suo Hongbin's curator insight, August 1, 2013 10:01 PM

good

Rescooped by claude from Learning & Technology News
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Transition from Tradition: 9 Tips for successfully moving your face-to-face course online

Let's face facts. A computer screen offers students neither the warm comfort of peers nor the imposing brow of an instructor to encourage them to show up. We have to manufacture that motivation elsewhere to inspire students to virtually attend class and provide a means for them to be proactive in their learning.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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sshsoluae's comment, August 2, 2013 8:31 AM
SMS Marketing
http://www.sshsol.com/sms-marketing.html
Ray Tolley's curator insight, August 3, 2013 5:30 AM

Reminds me of a document that I wrote some six years ago:

http://issuu.com/efoliouk/docs/the_joy_of_e-learning

Dean Mantz's curator insight, August 7, 2013 9:22 AM

I truly feel that teachers at the secondary level should consider "Blending" their curriculum courses in some facet.  This article provides some discussion and thought starting points.

 

Thanks to Nik Peachey for sharing it on scoop.it.