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Russia Makes Religious Education Mandatory in Schools

Russia Makes Religious Education Mandatory in Schools | Education | Scoop.it

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a new bill into law that makes religious education mandatory for all schools in the country. Every classroom will learn the basis abaout Russian Orthodox being that it is the #1 practiced religion in Russia. The lessons will begin on Sept. 1, 2013


Via Allison Anthony
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What if Finland’s great teachers taught in U.S. schools? (Not what you think)

What if Finland’s great teachers taught in U.S. schools? (Not what you think) | Education | Scoop.it
Why the U.S. emphasis on "teacher effectiveness" won't by itself really improve schools.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, May 15, 2013 8:56 AM

Finland is not a fan of standardization in education. However, teacher education in Finland is carefully standardized.  All teachers must earn a master’s degree at one of the country’s research universities. Competition to get into these teacher education programs is tough; only “the best and the brightest” are accepted. As a consequence, teaching is regarded as an esteemed profession, on par with medicine, law or engineering. There is another “teacher quality” checkpoint at graduation from School of Education in Finland. Students are not allowed to earn degrees to teach unless they demonstrate that they possess knowledge, skills and morals necessary to be a successful teacher.


But education policies in Finland concentrate more on school effectiveness than on teacher effectiveness. This indicates that what schools are expected to do is an effort of everyone in a school, working together, rather than teachers working  individually.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 15, 2013 9:25 AM

Although I admire what has been done in Finland, Pasi Sahlberg is an expert in educational reform in Finland and not globally. He and others have much to offer. What wold work? What would not? We need a different conversation, real leadership, and different structure.

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Why will Europe be the leading force for innovation in education?

Why will Europe be the leading force for innovation in education? | Education | Scoop.it
Why do we want innovation in education? What do we want to transform? Which changes do we want to achieve? What visionary practises can innovators bring for the future of education?

Via Peter Verschuere
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THE BEST BALLET SCHOOL IN THE WORLD strict russian ballet documentary

Hard dancers life.
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How Charter Schools Are Undermining the Future of Public Education | AlterNet.org

How Charter Schools Are Undermining the Future of Public Education | AlterNet.org | Education | Scoop.it

Somewhere along the way, nearly every teacher dreams of starting a school. I know I did.

 

More than once during the 30 years I taught English and journalism to high school students in Paterson, New Jersey, I imagined that creating my own school would open the door to everything I wanted as a teacher:

 

Colleagues with a shared vision of teaching and learning.Freedom from central office bureaucracy.A welcoming school culture that reflected the lives of our students and families.Professional autonomy that nourished innovation and individual and collective growth.School-based decision-making that pushed choices about resources, priorities, time, and staffing closer to the classrooms where it matters the most.

 

But reality can be hard on daydreams, and I got a glimpse of how complicated these issues are when my large comprehensive high school embraced the reform trend of the day and moved to create small theme academies inside the larger school.

 

As the lead teacher of a new communications academy, I soon faced a host of thorny questions: Who would our new academy serve? What would the selection process be? How would the academy share space and resources with the rest of the school? How would our academy team be formed, and what impact would overlapping circles of authority have on teachers' contractual and evaluation processes? What would be the effect of the new academies on the larger school around us, which still opened its doors to everyone?

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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