Education and Technology Integration
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Rescooped by Cyndee Phillips from The 21st Century
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Educational Technology... A Reflection on Leadership

Educational Technology... A Reflection on Leadership | Education and Technology Integration | Scoop.it
Leadership is rewarding and challenging.  When well received, I enjoy leadership very much.  Being able to help people with something that they needed help in my Ed Tech capacity is one of my most... (Educational Technology...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Nathalie Olivier's curator insight, October 15, 2013 4:57 AM

Très bon article sur la formationn, l'envie d'apprendre  et l'image du piano est excellente !

Rescooped by Cyndee Phillips from Digital Delights
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Educational Leadership:The Key to Changing the Teaching Profession:Representing Knowledge Nonlinguistically

Educational Leadership:The Key to Changing the Teaching Profession:Representing Knowledge Nonlinguistically | Education and Technology Integration | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:15 AM

"Students have plenty of opportunities to process information linguistically: They listen to teachers explain content, and they read and write about content. They have fewer opportunities in school, however, to process information nonlinguistically, even though educators have known for some time that the human mind processes incoming information in these two primary modes (Paivio, 1990). Because the linguistic mode does not necessarily involve formal rules of language, this kind of processing is technically referred to as semantic.

The second mode of processing involves constructing images of incoming information. Images can refer not only to mental pictures but also to smells, tastes, and kinesthetic sensations, such as how hot or cold something feels. Because this mode of processing goes beyond visual imagery, we refer to it more broadly as nonlinguistic.

Nonlinguistic strategies require students to generate a representation of new information that does not rely on language. In the hundreds of action research projects that we have conducted with teachers throughout the years, this approach is one of the most commonly studied. Specifically, across 129 studies in which teachers used nonlinguistic strategies—such as graphic organizers, sketches, and pictographs—with one class but not with another class studying the same content, the average effect was a 17 percentile point gain in student achievement (Haystead & Marzano, 2009)."

Rescooped by Cyndee Phillips from Transformational Leadership
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A Tale of Two Libraries | Reinventing Libraries

A Tale of Two Libraries | Reinventing Libraries | Education and Technology Integration | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, September 29, 2013 5:51 PM

Gure liburutegiak , eta eskolako gehienak jadanik iragana dela argi ikusten da, ilunak, tristeak,  deprimenteak.... con andereños igual de tristes, forrando libros todavía.... Nora doaz??  Hemen futurologia hurbila ematen da 2020 urtea helmuga, eta bi kontrako irudiak ematen dira. Nora goaz????

Rescooped by Cyndee Phillips from Digital Delights
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Educational Leadership:Informative Assessment:Assessing What Matters

Educational Leadership:Informative Assessment:Assessing What Matters | Education and Technology Integration | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, September 25, 2013 12:21 PM

"Worthy assessments should reflect the broader capabilities that students need to thrive in the 21st century."

Shona Leitch's curator insight, September 29, 2013 6:29 PM

I love this article, it has a very strong message and opens up the importance of not just "soft skills" but those hard to teach ones, creativity, innovation and in my discipine entrepreneurship.

Erin Ryan's curator insight, October 19, 2015 8:04 PM

One cannot think without content to think with and about. No doubt that students need foundational skills in order to actually use critically thinking and problem solving skills. But when in their life will they need to remember the facts from the textbook? How will they use what they memorized directly from a book? In education today, the focus is on quality control- making the grade, having top scores. The focus has shift away from teaching students those lifelong learning skills that they really need like creativity, common sense, how to win or lose, work ethic, etc. At the end of the day, our assessments of students need to match what they will be expected to do and perform in the real world. No perfect score will teach students how to be a good worker or how to follow their dreams without defeat.

Rescooped by Cyndee Phillips from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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5 Critical Mistakes Schools Make With iPads (And How To Correct Them) - Edudemic

5 Critical Mistakes Schools Make With iPads (And How To Correct Them) - Edudemic | Education and Technology Integration | Scoop.it
While we’ve witnessed many effective approaches to incorporating iPads successfully in the classroom, we’re struck by the common mistakes many schools are making with iPads, mistakes that are in some cases crippling the success of these initiatives.

Via John Evans
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Meleny Weber's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:23 PM

This article on  Edudemic is very useful for all teachers and future teachers who are interested in incorporating more technology into their classroom, especially iPads. I think Ipads can be very beneficial to a classroom for a variety of reasons. They offer more dynamic activities for students to assist in learning. They also make things run more smoothly in the classroom. This article allows insight into why some schools have been failing at implementing iPads into the curriculum, and offers a solution. Very good ideas! For example, the author writes that a language teacher may think iPads don't work well in his or her classroom because there is not a good enough app in the language. The article then offers the solution of purchasing other apps, such as a voice recording one, so the teacher can record her/himself saying the words in the language. This will allow the students to listen and hear how the words should sound. I completely trust this author's opinion and ideas because he states that he went to a iPads in the Classroom workshop at Harvard University over the summer for several days, where they learned all of the beneficial applications teachers and students can use in the classroom. Hopefully one day in my own classroom I will have the opportunity to incorporate an iPad, and if I do I will absolutely use these ideas.