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Things You Learn Your First Year Teaching

Now go back and thank your teachers. Post to Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1dqswox Like BuzzFeedVideo on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1ilcE7k Post to Twitter: http:...
Grace Creasey's insight:

For those first year teachers!

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Whole Brain Teaching: 6th Grade, Classroom Management

A lesson in the order of operations for a 6th grade class, demonstrating Whole Brain Teaching classroom management system. More information about Whole Brain...
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Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies

Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies | education and politics | Scoop.it
Evidence based teaching strategies have a far larger effect on student results than others do. Discover the top ten, evidence based teaching strategies in this article.

Via Patti Kinney
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Rescooped by Grace Creasey from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Reproduction of Copyright Materials & Fair Use

Reproduction of Copyright Materials & Fair Use | education and politics | Scoop.it

Basic Copyright Principles

The Law. Copyright laws protect original works of authorship. The Copyright Act gives the owner of a copyright the exclusive right to do and authorize others to do certain things in regard to a copyrighted work, including: make copies, distribute the work, display or perform the work publicly, and create derivative works. These exclusive rights are subject to only limited exceptions. In academia, the five major exceptions to the copyright owner's exclusive rights are: fair use, the face-to-face teaching exception, the distance-learning exception (codified in the 2002 TEACH Act), the first-sale doctrine, and the library and archives exception. Note that there is no over-arching copyright exception for academic uses; academic journals and text publishers expect royalties for use of their content.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/what-you-should-know-about-copyright/

 


Via Gust MEES
Grace Creasey's insight:

Really, really important for teachers to keep in mind as we start copying, re-posting and using!

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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 11, 2014 7:56 AM

Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/what-you-should-know-about-copyright/


Olga Senognoeva's curator insight, August 11, 2014 1:14 PM

Использование контента, защищенного авторскими правами.

 

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The Art (& Science) of Great Teaching: Sam Chaltain at TEDxYouth@BFS

Sam Chaltain is a DC-based writer and education activist. He works with schools, school districts, and public and private sector companies to help them creat...
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Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning

Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning | education and politics | Scoop.it

What happens when you tell your students to "pay attention!" More than you may think. This post explores what goes on in the brain and ways the brain pays attention. Research is shared as well as what you can do in your classroom immediately as well what you can do in the long term.
Short term solutions include "using prediction; using the brief pause and chunk technique; priming the learning with small hints, appetizers and teasers" and more.

You may also choose to view a video of a session "Teaching with the Brain in Mind" at http://www.scilearn.com/company/webinars/ (you will need to scroll down the page to find the link).


Via Beth Dichter
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Debra Evans's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:08 PM

Useful

Ruth Virginia Barton's curator insight, February 13, 2015 10:37 AM

"Instead of saying to students, “Pay attention!” what you really want to say is, “Suppress interesting things!” Why? Students already DO pay attention."  The point being, prolonged attention paying is a learned skill, practiced.  Intersperse teaching with stand-up breaks, quick physical activity.  Create "hooks' for attention - previews - and offer rewards - like homework free pass this month - for students who get it right; helps them be invested in topic