Education and a coffee klatch
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Education and a coffee klatch
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers . Reading & Language . Education | PBS Parents

What Not to Say to Emerging Readers . Reading & Language . Education | PBS Parents | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
We've listed common mistakes that some parents make, along with better ways to support emerging readers. (A list of what NOT to say when helping emerging #readers.
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Teaching Reading in the Digital Age

Teaching Reading in the Digital Age | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world ...

Via Mel Riddile
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Lauren's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:24 AM

Great thoughts for reading teachers 

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:29 PM

Earlier this summer, following a deep dive into the paradigm shifting models of design thinking and gamification in education at the annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE 2013), I found myself settling in to a week-long study of the time-tested, best-practices pedagogy at the Reading and Writing Institutes at Teachers College, Columbia University. It felt a bit like inhabiting one portion of my brain and then taking up residence in an entirely different thinking space – both equally valid to my professional life. Searching for a way to reconcile my learning, I am left wondering most about what it means to be a reader today.

Common Ground

The educational visionaries at ISTE, who call for creating a radically different learning environment for today’s self-directed learners, can find surprising common ground with some of the basic tenets of the Lucy Calkins approach to teaching reading (at least as I understand it as a first-year attendee of the Reading Institute).

For both, student choice remains central to learning, whether students are choosing the books they want to read from a classroom library or researching how to modify classroom furniture for a project employing design theory.Another crossover, the role of the teacher as coach who provides mini-lessons on learning strategies, might succeed as easily with a teacher seated at a chart and easel as with the digital-age teacher who uses short flipped lessons to deliver directed instruction.Innovators who tout the merits of gaming as a way to fire up students about their learning, for — ISTE keynoter Jane McGonigal, for instance — surely must recognize how the storytelling narrative sparks engagement in a gaming environment; likewise, the Reading Workshop method employs “leveling up” strategies familiar to gamers to move students through “leveled” classroom libraries that present offer more challenges and require greater sophistication as a students gain mastery of reading skills.

Digital Readers Reading

What, then, does this mean for those of us who teaching readers today? I am still searching for answers to questions that won’t let go of me.

The Reading Institute puts a lot of emphasis on “eyes on print” time – that is, on classroom time given over to readers engaged in the act of reading. This requires creating a culture of readers with books in their hands and sticky notes at the ready for jotting questions and tracking observations (leading to critical thinking). As a teacher who recognizes that students read in digital contexts as well, I find myself wondering if “eyes on text” (eyes on media?) might be a better term. Or is it even the same thing?  My students are constantly reading as oodles of different kinds of text-based media cross their paths. Don’t we need to prepare them with the nuanced skills required to read in every way possible?My students who use tablets or e-readers for reading time love the easy access to digital dictionaries. This frees them to engage with their reading even more deeply. Are they absorbing vocabulary more thoroughly and accurately than the students who are too lazy or too engrossed to open a dictionary? Digital readers do not necessarily preclude commenting on texts. Students with e-readers can certainly annotate their reading with digital comments. Is this any different from the kind of critical questioning students do with pen in hand?My goal is to teach my students to develop a passion for reading, but I also want them to use any effective means that can help them go beyond the surface in their reading. I also recognize the value in sharing their ideas with others. Is there something magical about the handwritten (and easily sharable) sticky note comment favored by the Reading Institute, or can my students do just as well (better?) with a sticky note app like Popplet?The Reading Institute went to great pains to introduce lessons about the reading of nonfiction, acknowledging a new pedagogical emphasis on nonfiction in the Common Core. As a result, considerable (though not exclusive) attention at the Institute was given over to using historical fiction in classroom libraries and as “anchor texts” for mini-lessons. I want to go further. I would venture that most students don’t know enough about the variety of nonfiction forms to know the difference between what is basically made up (fiction) or basically true (nonfiction) – in my experience, they tend to see everything they read in terms of story. Students need to be able to read an article online and identify it as a blog or a news story or a reference source. They need to recognize rhetorical strategies like comparison or illustration and understand how they affect a reader. As my section leader at the Reading Institute stated, students need to question perspective and bias in every kind of writing. I wonder, are we really doing enough to address these skills in our classes?Reading also represents an intersection of design, image, and text. The picture book, at its best, uses each avenue of communication to the fullest. So I am excited to follow the Reading Workshop method and return to picture books and image-rich texts (online or otherwise) as a means of teaching reading skills. I also like how the Reading Institute breaks down the skills needed to deconstruct a page and address the increasing complexity of the relationship of image to text, as this builds from mere illustration to direct contradiction. How can teachers of reading in a digital context build upon this work? At the same time, how might we all step back and consider more thoroughly the elements of design and their relationship to meaning?Reading for pure pleasure is certainly something we still want to nurture – whether the children we teach are “trapped” by an engaging story (as one of my rising sixth-graders put it on a recent discussion board about his summer reading) or whether they follow the meandering path of their burgeoning curiosity by skipping from website to website (we used to call this browsing when we did it in libraries or bookstores). Still, what are the ways we can encourage our students to extend their reading – yes, by reading for depth and understanding in a traditional sense, but also by accessing auxiliary information available to us online, by following hyperlinks to make more connections, or by engaging in a rousing backchannel chat?At the same time, we certainly also need to teach students how to handle the distractions of reading in a digital context, just as we help them mediate the distractions of an antsy classmate or a nearby whispered tutorial. How can we do this if we never allow them to read on their own devices and in ways that are second-nature to them?

A New Generation of Readers

After participating in these two very different learning venues, I went off the grid and experienced three delicious days of beach reading. I felt the pull of the stories like the tide, and I gave into where they took me. I want my students to feel that. But since I’ve come home, I’ve caught up on my Twitter feed, read my personal and work emails, and browsed for articles related to the topic of this blog post. This is the kind of reading my students will do – and already do – on a daily basis.

What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world in which we are surrounded by text from which we must derive meaning.

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The Importance of Technology Education at the Elementary Level: Kasey Dirnberger at TEDxMCPSTeachers

Kasey Dirnberger teaches Computer Applications/Business at Meadow Hill Middle School in Missoula, Montana, and a beginner computer course at the Adult Educat...
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How bored I am ! (Present Continuous RAP Song) ...

How bored I am ! (Present Continuous RAP Song) ... | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
"Learn and teach Simple Present Continous Tense through this RAP song written by Turgay Evren, and sung by Jason R Levine. Visit http://www.erdemyayinlari.com... Slow enough for elementary learners to practice.Excellent (How bored I am !
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Why Googling Isn’t All That: Web Information Literacy in the 21st Century

Why Googling Isn’t All That: Web Information Literacy in the 21st Century | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Chances are, when you’ve been assigned a research paper, your first idea is that you’ll to do a quick search on Google. Perhaps you’ve been surprised when your instructor says that Googling for resources is not allowed.

Via joyrosario, Anu Ojaranta
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Anu Ojaranta's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:20 AM

Multiliteracies!

Anu Ojaranta's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:21 AM

Multiliteracies!

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Common Core: Evaluating The Credibility of Digital Sources

Common Core: Evaluating The Credibility of Digital Sources | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Students today are hyper connected to information, but do they know how to research? Nope.

Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor, Joan Baslow-Temple
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Jaime Parker's curator insight, July 10, 2013 2:22 PM

I have a friend who teaches English courses at the college level and this is her biggest complaint. She says that the students simply do not know how to research. They don't know how to use databases or how to evaluate websites which seems so crazy to me. I'm not sure why these skills aren't being taught or integrated into every content area. Perhaps too much time is being spent preparing students for standardized testing.

 

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, July 10, 2013 7:07 PM

What to expect when librarians are being cut everywhere or stretched so thin to covel 4 schools in one week?

 

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:26 PM

Useful form for evaluating websites.

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Column: French Schools Show Pitfalls for US Common Core Curriculum - Valley News

Column: French Schools Show Pitfalls for US Common Core Curriculum Valley News For better and for worse, France's rigorous national curriculum offers important lessons as the United States sets out to raise standards by introducing a Common Core...
Linda Miller McMillan's insight:

Interesting article

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Great iPad Apps and Activities for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Great iPad Apps and Activities for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it

"When I first published Teachers Guide to The Use of iPad in Education I was told that an iPad activities section was missing in it and to accommodate for this I am sharing with you today a great document featuring several activities teachers can try with their students using iPad. These are just some examples among many but they will definitely help you have a general idea of how to create your own activities that meet the specifics of your teaching environment as well as your students learning needs."


Via John Evans
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Creating Schoolwide PBL Aligned to Common Core

Creating Schoolwide PBL Aligned to Common Core | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Green Street Academy is a two-year-old public middle and high school in urban Baltimore, Maryland.
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Want to Improve Education? Change the Way You Talk About Teachers

Want to Improve Education? Change the Way You Talk About Teachers | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Want to Improve Education? Change the Way You Talk About Teachers (This is what's @good!: Want to Improve Education?
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How Not to Implement the CCSS ELA & Literacy Standards: 10 Cautionary Thoughts for Secondary Teachers | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

How Not to Implement the CCSS ELA & Literacy Standards: 10 Cautionary Thoughts for Secondary Teachers | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it

With the emergence of the Common Core State Standards, secondary teachers are feeling the heat. For years, many teachers have relied on the English Department to teach anything that smacked of reading. Now, teaching reading and literacy skills are on every secondary teacher’s plate. With the Common Core Standards,every teacher in the building is responsible for literacy.

 

In a previous post for secondary teachers getting ready to face these challenges, I provided several great resources to get you started in the right direction.

 

Today I’ve simply compiled a list of 10 easy ways NOT to implement the ELA & literacy standards.


Via Deb Gardner
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, February 19, 2013 9:53 AM

Can't wait to see what TO DO. :)

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7 Common Core Ways to Assess Knowledge

7 Common Core Ways to Assess Knowledge | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
This is always challenging, isn't it? Finding evidence that students have learned what you taught, that they can apply their knowledge to complex problems. How do you do this? Rubrics? Group projec...

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93% of Principals and 92% of Teachers say they are knowledgeable about the Common Core

93% of Principals and 92% of Teachers say they are knowledgeable about the Common Core | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it

Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, February 21, 2013 7:37 AM

According to the MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, educators are confident about implementing the Common Core, less so about its potential for increasing student success. 

  • Nine in 10 principals (93%) and teachers (92%) say they are knowledgeable about the Common Core.  
  • Nine in 10 principals (90%) and teachers (93%) believe that teachers in their schools already have the academic skills and abilities to implement the Common Core in their classrooms. 
  • Teachers and principals are more likely to be very confident that teachers have the ability to implement the Common Core (53% of teachers; 38% of principals) than they are very confident that the Common Core will improve the achievement of students (17% of teachers; 22% of principals) or better prepare students for college and the workforce (20% of teachers; 24% of principals).  
  • A majority of teachers (62%) and a smaller proportion of principals (46%) say teachers in their schools are already using the Common Core a great deal in their teaching this year. 
Linda Miller McMillan's comment, February 28, 2013 5:26 PM
Some very interesting information! It is good to see positive thinking regarding the CCSS.
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40 Sources for Curated Educational Videos

40 Sources for Curated Educational Videos | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Fortunately, there are some great websites and services that take the guesswork out of finding and sorting educational video content. Here is the most updated list of some of the curated video site...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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4 Great Educational Alternatives to Pinterest

4 Great Educational Alternatives to Pinterest | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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iPad in Education

iPad in Education | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Innovative ideas for using iPads in education (Latest edition of my flipboard magazine iPad in Education http://t.co/Yd9oAZv4iL #ipad #ipadedu #ipadeducation)...
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5 things every parent needs to know about the Common Core - Education - AEI

5 things every parent needs to know about the Common Core - Education - AEI | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
Excellent article. 5 things every parent needs to know about the Common Core - Education - AEI http://t.co/7Xo84Hq4fT
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10 Creative Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic

10 Creative Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
While there are hundreds of tools and devices available, we have found 10 creative ways to use Google tools and services to help improve learning.

Via Donna Browne, Lia Sant
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TechinBiz's comment, May 22, 2013 7:10 AM
Great ideas thanks
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Teach it Write: Common Core Standards are just one tool in the toolbox

For many teachers, administrators and parents, the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) adopted by 45 out of the 50 states are causing common core brain pain instead of common core brain gain. In The Washington Post ...

Via Darren Burris
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Why girls in India are still missing out on the education they need

Why girls in India are still missing out on the education they need | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
India is no longer considered a poor country and yet many children do not receive a good education.
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Should We All Learn the Finnish Way?

Should We All Learn the Finnish Way? | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
In the world of education, these days Finland is like a rock star. Finnish experts are all over the media, describing the "Finnish education miracle" and suggesting that other countries copy their practices.
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What High School Parents Should Know About Common Core

What High School Parents Should Know About Common Core | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
The new standards will mean major changes for students and parents.
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The Common Core: 10 Discussion Starters for Secondary Teachers | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

The Common Core: 10 Discussion Starters for Secondary Teachers | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it
The Common Core: 10 Discussion Starters for Secondary Teachers | new post at Learning Unlimited http://t.co/GcEhJRpS #satchat

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Understanding Slavery - Learning Adventures

Understanding Slavery - Learning Adventures | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Differentiating for Text Difficulty under Common Core

Differentiating for Text Difficulty under Common Core | Education and a coffee klatch | Scoop.it

Shanahan on Literacy


Via Mel Riddile
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