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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Educated | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 2016 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 2016 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 1, 2016 7:24 PM
A rainbow of shipping routes and info
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The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie

The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie | Educated | Scoop.it

"What we call Chinese food (including the fortune-filled cookies) has become an integral part of the American culture and cuisine, with a complex history that dates back to the 19th Century."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 29, 2015 8:28 AM

This  99 Percent Invisible podcast explores the fascinating story of the Americanization of Chinese food, and the icon of Chinese food in the States, the  fortune cookie (no, that is decidedly NOT from China).  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content. 

 

That first podcast is reminiscent of a second podcast from  NPR about an American-style Chinese restaurant that opened in Shanghai to cater to Americans living in China who miss 'Chinese food' as it's made back home.  What's the name of the restaurant?  Fortune Cookie, of course. 

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, California, podcast, historical.

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:44 AM

As with some other cultures, the Chinese food we eat is different from it original homeland (Mexican food is another example). Many thing the fortune cookie if from China, but it is an American idea. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Educated | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of

Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of | Educated | Scoop.it
Dandies in Congo, emos in Iraq, electro-hillbilly truckers in Japan. No matter how hard life can be, people carve out original ways of living.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 11:20 AM
P.S. The guy in the top photo reminded me of my dad. He was always a sharp-dressed man! :)
John Dyhouse's comment, February 25, 2013 11:35 AM
Interesting cultures showing that people have a need to identify with their peers to be one step ahead of the crowd, I guess
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:35 PM

When considering subcultures, it is sometimes easy to forget that they exist in other countries. While I was familiar with groups such as the "chavs" in England, and the Dandies in the Congo, I never realized that some subcultures that are prevalent in the USA exist in places such as Indonesia. It's amazing to see how some fads have globalized and are present in different places. I doubt that the Ramones, while making music in their garage would dream that they would spark a globally present subculture. 

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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Educated | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States, Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedom Health-Healthy communities prosper Economy-Green energy equals good business Equality-Women rule Justice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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How Things Spread

How Things Spread | Educated | Scoop.it
What makes an idea, a brand, or a behavior catch fire? This hour, TED speakers explore the mysteries behind the many things we spread: laughter and sadness, imagination, viruses and viral ideas.

What makes an idea, a brand, or a behavior catch fire? This hour, TED speakers explore the mysteries behind the many things we spread: laughter and sadness, imagination, viruses and viral ideas.

 

Via Seth Dixon
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What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Jelel Ezzine's curator insight, March 25, 2016 3:13 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

Trish Harris's curator insight, March 31, 2016 7:40 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:57 PM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | Educated | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:11 PM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | Educated | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 2015 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Educated | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | Educated | Scoop.it
Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.

 

In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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