EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools
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10 classroom routines that get kids talking (and writing) about math strategies -

10 classroom routines that get kids talking (and writing) about math strategies - | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Most kids find it challenging to explain how they solve math problems and to put what they know about math into words. These ten simple classroom routines can help make math talk a regular part of your day: 1) Start your math block with a strategizing session instead of a traditional warm-up problem. Rather than …
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This list of classroom routines used to get students talking about math strategies would be perfect for any classroom. With some modification, these strategies could be used at many grade levels to promote student learning and understanding about difficult math concepts. Students often struggle with math, especially word problems, so using the strategies listed in this article would help students strategize and work problems out using their words and peer collaboration. I would love to establish these ten classroom routines in my future classroom because I believe they could greatly benefit all students. One of my favorite routines listed is "discuss math practices instead of just how a student arrived at the answer" because discovering the answer is not always the most important part of learning. Rather, it is how one figures out the answer that is the most important. This list of routines supports project based learning because they encourage students to think outside the box. These routines emphasize strategizing, critical thinking, and creative thinking all of which are essential skills in the 21st century. Students need to begin thinking more on their own in order to train their brains to problem solve and think critically, in both math and other subjects. Establishing these routines will help to create more globally competent students. 

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CTE - Classroom Climate

Ideas and strategies on how to create and maintain inclusive classrooms, such as icebreakers, establishing ground rules, managing classroom climate, and utilizing inclusive teaching strategies.
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I found this article to be important because it not only discussed why classroom climate is important, but what types of factors can influence your classroom climate as well. These factors include stereotypes, the tone used within your classroom, student-student interactions, faculty-student interactions, and the content teachers present to their students. It is important to be wary of these factors while trying to create a positive classroom climate. These types of factors will help to create a classroom that promotes project based learning, resiliency, and global competency, all of which are important to me as a future educator. I want my students to feel comfortable, safe, and confident in the classroom in order to gain the most out of their educational experiences. 

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Why School Culture Matters, and How to Improve It

Why School Culture Matters, and How to Improve It | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Obviously, school leaders can't always mimic businesses -- but they can learn from them. When business leaders teach principals the skills that they use to build a strong organizational culture, school leaders can completely transform their schools.
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A school's culture is just as important as a classroom's climate. Schools need to promote "a shared sense of purpose and values, norms of continuous learning and improvement, collaborative collegial relationships... and sharing experiences". Students need to feel welcomed and excited about learning when they walk into their schools. This can be accomplished by friendly and welcoming staff eager to greet students as they walk through the door and with a lot of decor and examples of students work found throughout the hallways. Children want to see what other grades and other classrooms are up to, so putting their work on display is a very important component of a schools culture. Promoting a shared sense of values and purpose supports whole-child thinking because it will allow students to feel supported, challenged, and safe within their schools. Project based learning requires students to be able to share their experiences and collaborate with their peers. If a school's culture is supportive of this, then project based learning can occur. 

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Pin by Katy Kerbow Scentsy- Ind. Consultant on School is Cool | Pinterest

Pin by Katy Kerbow Scentsy- Ind. Consultant on School is Cool | Pinterest | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Great idea! Creates such a great classroom climate. jennifermacker class family photos picture shelf | See more about picture frames, family pictures and framed pictures.
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A family photo picture shelf would be a great addition to any classroom! This would be a great way to help children get to know one another and to help them learn more about their classmates and their backgrounds. You could have your students bring in pictures of their families and do a little show and tell and pass everyone's pictures around the classroom. This is another great way to celebrate each others differences and a wonderful way to help children gain sensitivity and awareness about cultural differences and to promote conversations on the topic. This ties into whole-child thinking because having this in your classroom would help students feel connected to their classroom and their peers in a way outside of academics alone. Students will begin to connect with their peers on a deeper level, which will promote trust and friendship, which are key components to creating a positive classroom climate. 

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Pin by Ms. Olivia Jackson on Classroom Climate | Pinterest

Pin by Ms. Olivia Jackson on Classroom Climate | Pinterest | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Aspects of classroom climate chart. Oh, how I heart charts. | See more about teaching resources, teaching and charts.
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

This chart breaks down all of the crucial aspects of a positive classroom climate. The intellectual, social, emotional, and physical components of a classroom all contribute to the overall climate, well-being of students, and potential for project based learning to occur. To create a climate that supports children intellectually teachers must create authentic tasks that are meaningful and challenging, such as project-based learning assignments. For the social aspect of a child, teachers must ensure that children are given the opportunity to work with their peers on assignments. Also, teachers need to make sure that their students feel safe and comfortable enough in their classroom to approach them with any questions or concerns that they might have. To create a classroom climate that supports the emotional development of your students you need to be sure to identify and value the unique backgrounds of all of your students, such as through activities like "Me Stew". As for the physical component or "space" in a classroom, classrooms need to be open and invite students to interact with their peers when they need to do so. Students need to have easy access to all of the materials that they need to complete their assignments and projects successfully. If all of these components of classroom climate are met, children will be provided with a positive classroom environment that promotes student learning and fosters creativity.

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Classroom norms vs rules printable free | Classroom ideas | Pinterest

Classroom norms vs rules printable free | Classroom ideas | Pinterest | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
This Pin was discovered by Jessica. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest. | See more about puzzle pieces, puzzles and mission statements.
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

Classroom norms are the established and expected behaviors of students in a classroom and overall learning community, such as their school. Classroom norms are a great way to explain to students what is expected of them without giving them a list of rules to follow. One of the greatest benefits of using classroom norms is that norms can be extended to situations outside of the classroom as well, like at home or in their community. Using norms like "we learn from our mistakes" and "we respect each other" applies to more than just the lives of students in school. These are important norms for children to follow no matter where they are. Presenting them with norms that apply to their daily lives will improve their understanding and acceptance of why we need to behave in certain ways, as opposed to giving them a list of rules that only applies to their behavior in their classrooms, such as "you must stay seated at all times" or "you must raise your hand to speak". Rules such as these limit students creativity and prevent them from expressing themselves freely. If students internalize these norms they will not need specific rules to follow, because the norms incorporate all sorts of rules inside of them. In my future classroom, I would like my students and I to create a list of norms to follow together and I would display them similarly to the photo above, such as on a bulletin board. The norms that I would choose for my classroom would vary depending on the grade level that I was working with, but some might include respecting yourself and others property, using kind words, treating others as you would like to be treated, and cooperating with your peers and helping each other learn. Establishing norms such as these will not only help my classroom run smoothly, but they will better prepare my students for their futures and help to create students that are motivated to learn and take ownership over their educations. 

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Becca Wagman's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:18 PM

Classroom Climate: This poster gives a positive meaning to the classroom expectations. Rules are usually seen as something negative and annoying that students have to follow or consequences follow, but this poster makes you proud to be part of this community. The use of the word "we" makes the class feel like a family or a community that has a united front on these points. Each sentence is inspiring: we celebrate each other's success, we read, we are a team, we learn from our mistakes, we respect each other, and we try our best. In each of these statements it keeps students accountable, but the way the expectations are presented make students want to be described as belonging to this group. The poster allows the students to identify themselves with the poster and strive to act in that way. This poster fosters the idea of resilience, especially in the ideas of learning from our mistakes, celebrating other student's successes, and trying our best. It is important for children to not get discouraged when they mess up because that is part of learning. Even with hurting people's feelings it is important to recognize what you did wrong, apologize, and most importantly is to learn from the mistake and change your ways in the future. (NORMS)

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Key Factors in Creating a Positive Classroom Climate > Committee for Children

Key Factors in Creating a Positive Classroom Climate > Committee for Children | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
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NORMS

Creating a positive classroom climate is crucial to in order to create a classroom that promotes student learning. However, creating a positive classroom climate is not something that just happens, it takes time and effort from both the students and teacher. The three "pieces" involved in creating a positive classroom climate, according to this article, are constructing and reinforcing classroom rules and norms, encouraging peer relationships, and creating positive relationships between yourself (the teacher) and all of your students. Students need to feel connected to their teacher and classmates, in order to fully apply themselves to their learning and trust the learning process. Teachers can conduct one-on-one interviews with their students throughout the school year to check in with them and ask about how they are doing as a whole. Letting students know that you care about them on a much deeper level than just as their students will allow them to open up and truly feel connected to their classroom. Regardless of your students past experiences or lives outside of school, teachers can strive to promote a positive learning environment through the use of activities that deliberately shape their classroom climate. 

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Summer PD: How Project-Based Learning Can Fit (or Not) in an Elementary School Program

Summer PD: How Project-Based Learning Can Fit (or Not) in an Elementary School Program | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
John Larmer


John Larmer is the Director of Product Development at the Buck Institute for Education.


In today's world of standards, testing, scripted literacy models, and the use of strictl
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SCHOOL OLYMPICS - YouTube

The students at St Patrick's school got an Olympic gold education on the sports.
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Winter Olympics at St Patricks school: Students were given the task to learn about the sports involved in the Winter Olympic games. Students were given the opportunity to become experts in the sports that they were assigned, and then got to compete against the rest of their school. This was such a creative way to not only teach students about the olympics and the different sports involved, but also to get them up and moving as well! 

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Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn | MindShift

Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn | MindShift | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it

"It may seem obvious that lecturing isn’t the best method to get students thinking and learning. Project-based learning and other interactive approaches have been popular in elementary and secondary schools for a long time, and of course the discussion-based seminar is an age-old approach. But lecturing is still the dominant teaching method in large classes at the college level, and also at many high schools – especially in the sciences. Experts say different approaches to teaching large classes can help more students learn, and help them learn better."

 

Harvard physicist Eric Mazur, one of the pioneers in developing a new way to teach large classes, recounts his own discovery of a new, more effective way to teach, an approach he calls “peer instruction.”  Rather than teaching by telling, Azur teaches by questioning.  Watch a video of Mazur’s peer instruction approach in action here: http://mindshift.kqed.org/2012/02/dont-lecture-me-rethinking-how-college-students-learn-2/

 

For more info on Peer Instruction as a teaching method, go to this website: http://arts.monash.edu.au/philosophy/peer-instruction/


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

This article discussed the importance of modifying teaching techniques in large, college lecture halls. So much of our nations time is spend examining, altering, and improving teaching techniques in elementary, middle, and high school classrooms that college often gets overlooked. College students need to be taught in creative and interesting ways just like younger students. This article discussed the benefits of using a "peer instruction" method of teaching in large college lecture halls. I have been exposed to this style of teaching in multiple of my college courses throughout the past couple years and I believe that it is very beneficial for learning. 

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The Benefits of Project Based Learning in Elementary School by Samantha Stewart

The Benefits of Project Based Learning in Elementary School by Samantha Stewart | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Project Based Learning in Elementary SchoolsGetting students to be interested and engaged in their school work can often be a challenge for many teachers. The standard note-taking and memorizing infor...

Via Jim George
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

This article does a great job at describing some of the benefits of using project based learning in elementary, middle, and high schools. For younger students, project based learning allows for them to explore topics and ideas that both interest them and relate to the curriculum. As students get older, teachers can create project based learning activities that are more challenging, and allow for students to dip deep into topics that they find interesting and meaningful. This is a great alternative to the standard method of teaching that takes place in most classrooms. 

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Pin by Teaching on the Front Page on Classroom Management | Pinterest

Pin by Teaching on the Front Page on Classroom Management | Pinterest | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Voice Levels with appropriate activities or locations listed below each level | See more about voice levels.
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

In class, we discussed the impact classroom noise levels can have on group work. If classroom's become too noisy, they run the risk of not only interrupting the groups working in that class, but other classrooms as well. This "check your voice" poster board would be a great way to help students always be aware of what noise levels their voices should be on. The noise level categories are labeled as silent, soft whisper, quiet voice, regular voice, and loud voice which are all easy for children to understand. Underneath each category, different situations are listed to inform students of when each noise level should be used. For example, under category one which is silent, hallways and independent work time are listed, because this is a time for students to be silent. Under category five, loud voice, outside recess is the only activity listed. This would help to keep any classroom well managed and running efficiently, which is a crucial component of all classrooms, especially when it comes to creating an environment that supports project based learning. Project based learning requires students to be able to work collaboratively with their peers which often means that noise levels become elevated within classrooms. Therefore, having a board such as this present in the classroom would allow for students to work collaboratively while still being aware of their surroundings and their voice levels. This poster would help to create a productive, happy, and manageable work space within the classroom. 

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POSTERS Attitudes About Learning - Positive Classroom Norms for Behavior

POSTERS Attitudes About Learning - Positive Classroom Norms for Behavior | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
POSTERS Attitudes About Learning - Positive Classroom Norm | See more about learning and posters.
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

It is important to not only discuss the rules and norms in a classroom, but attitudes towards learning as well. By creating a poster such as this, my students and I could come up with attitudes that we felt would be most beneficial towards learning. Some attitudes we could create are, "I believe lifelong learning will help me achieve my goals" and "I am willing to make mistakes and learn from them." All of the attitudes we would put up on the board would be positive ones, and ones that would help students both inside and outside of the classroom. This would contribute to my classrooms overall classroom climate because my students would begin to internalize these attitudes and have a constant reminder of what is expected of them on the boards surrounding them in their classroom. Creating norms such as these would help children succeed both in school and in the real world, promoting global competency and resiliency. Having a positive attitude about learning and life in general will positively impact students ability to succeed and intrinsically motivate them to do well in school and to succeed in college and the workforce. Creating norms, as opposed to rules, will help to create better prepared and well-rounded students. 

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Creating a Positive Classroom Climate:

Creating a Positive Classroom Climate: | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

This article discusses the importance of establishing meaningful relationships with each of your students and the impact that can have on student learning. Students need to feel like their teachers care about them and their presence in their classroom. Simple gestures like acknowledging students by their first name when they walk through the door has the capability of brightening their entire day, so why not make the effort to do so? This article also mentions a fun activity that teachers can do called "care packages". Throughout the year each student gets to make a care package where all of their classmates write something they like or appreciate about each of their classmates on their care package bag. This would be a great way to promote friendship in your classroom and to help students express their feelings towards one another. This would have a very positive impact on your classroom's climate and students overall wellbeing. 

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Pin by Carolyn Wilhelm, NBCT, Wise Owl Factory on Promote Classroom Kindness | Pinterest

Pin by Carolyn Wilhelm, NBCT, Wise Owl Factory on Promote Classroom Kindness | Pinterest | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
A lovely and important display in Sue Butter's excellent Kindergarten class at Great Expectations in Grand Marais, MN, for the beginning of the year, helpful for children feeling noticed and important in the class and learning about others for a nice classroom climate | See more about grand marais, learning and feelings.
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

This "I like me because..." activity would be perfect for teaching children to love who they are and respect each others differences. This type of activity could be done multiple times throughout the school year and children could choose something different about themselves every time. Children would get to know more about their classmates and would be given the opportunity to discuss what they love most about themselves. This activity would promote kindness among classmates, which would contribute to the overall classroom climate. I will be doing activities like this in my future classroom because giving children the opportunity to express themselves and to talk about themselves with their peers is important for their social and emotional development. There are many factors that can impact children's overall learning experiences and academic performance, so it is important to intentionally select activities like these to complete in your classroom to support the "whole-child". 

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Pin by Elementary Nerd on Behavior Management | Pinterest

Pin by Elementary Nerd on Behavior Management | Pinterest | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Could including yoga into a classroom routine reduce discipline problems? | See more about yoga.
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

In my ideal classroom, I would love to make time to do some sort of yoga routine with my students! While this is certainly something that you could not do on a daily basis due to time restraints, doing this once a week could really promote a happy, calm, and stress free learning environment in my classroom. Doing yoga would allow my students and I to take a little time out of our busy school day to reflect and relax. As mentioned in the photo above, yoga can improve students self-esteem and improve disciplinary problems. I intentionally selected this activity because it supports whole-child thinking. This would provide my students with a time that is free of rigid scheduling and direction, a time for them to reflect and focus on themselves, and it would provide them with the warm and loving atmosphere that they need to thrive. Creating a classroom environment that takes into consideration the "whole-child" is very important because there are many factors that impact children's overall well-being, which also impacts their learning experiences. Providing my students with a time to do yoga during the school day would positively impact their well-being and mental and physical health, which would therefore improve their overall learning experiences as well.

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The+Creative+Classroom.pdf

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It is becoming increasingly apparent that the physical characteristics and set up of classrooms have a greater impact on student learning than we once thought. Many of the classrooms found today in the 21st century look similar to the classrooms that were found decades ago, with similar desk arrangements and decor. It is time that we make the transition into creating classrooms that foster creativity and promote a positive learning environment and project-based learning. Technology also plays a huge role in the lives of both students and educators today, so incorporating technology into the classroom is another crucial component of learning in the 21st century. All components of classrooms from the lighting, to the use of color, decorations, resources, space configurations, and furniture, greatly impact children's experiences in the class and their overall attitude. In my ideal classroom, I would want a lot of windows so that I could use natural lighting to fill my classroom. A classroom without windows often feels boxed in and dark, which is certain to have an impact on both my mood and the mood's of my students as well. Incorporating a lot of color into my classroom would be another necessity, because color promotes creativity and creates an inviting atmosphere. When it comes to my classroom's space, ideally I would like to be placed in a very open classroom with high ceilings and plenty of room for my students to roam around when activities call for group collaborations and hands on activities. Having an open classroom environment would allow for my students to work freely with their peers without having to worry about disrupting other groups or not having ample space to work. The implementation of technology in the classroom opens up a whole new world to students, which is why it is becoming so important in today's schools. Students must become comfortable using technology because technology has become such a huge part of today's society. Also, many project-based learning tasks require the use of technology, meaning that students would need to be comfortable using computers and tablets in order to successfully complete many of the projects. 

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What the Teacher Wants!: I gave in.

What the Teacher Wants!: I gave in. | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
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When I was in elementary school, I remember even the simplest things, such as having a bean bag chair in the classroom library, making the biggest difference on my perspective and comfort level in the classroom. For this DIY (do it yourself) project, you can make cool, fun, and comfortable chairs for your students to sit in while working at a table in groups. For this project, all you need is a staple gun, plywood, staples, fabric, crates, glue, foam, and maybe another helping hand. These uniques chairs are easy to store and stack, which would help to conserve space in the classroom. These chairs would brighten up my classroom and hopefully, the daily lives of my students as well. Children spend a lot of time in their classrooms, therefore it is important to make them as fun, bright, and lively as possible. Having these stools in my classroom would contribute to creating a space that is supportive of project based learning because they are light and easy to move around, so students could carry them around the room to sit somewhere with their groups or peers if they need to find a quiet space to work. Having furniture in your classroom that is easy to move around, stack, and versatile is a crucial component to successfully implementing project based learning in the classroom. 

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Using project-based learning to engage students with politics

Using project-based learning to engage students with politics | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Teacher John Bosselman explains how he devised a cross-curricular challenge – spanning citizenship, literature and art – to help students engage with complex social issues
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Project-based learning: 10 top tips for schools

Project-based learning: 10 top tips for schools | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
From getting started and engaging reluctant staff to designing your first project, our panel of experts share advice on all things project-based learning
Amanda Kennedy's insight:

This article provides some very useful tips for teachers to consider if they have the desire to implement project based learning in their classrooms. Some of these tips include encouraging teachers to get inspiration from other schools when coming up with ideas for projects, completing the project themselves first to make sure everything works out as planned, and to encourage students to take advantage of their peers ideas and their constructive criticism. All of these tips would be very useful for teachers to review before beginning project based learning in their classrooms. 

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Learning Is a Way of Life - Huffington Post

Learning Is a Way of Life - Huffington Post | EDCI 397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools | Scoop.it
Learning Is a Way of LifeHuffington PostI became a procrastinator in eighth grade, when I switched from project-based learning in my elementary school, which encourages learning itself, to test-based learning, which encourages cramming knowledge...

Via Sabari Raja
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When this article says, "I think our focus -- the focus that the system perpetuates -- is a bit skewed, because, in the grand scheme of things, college is only four years, whereas the rest of your life is well, forever" I could not agree more. Our current system of education is set up in a way that focuses too much on testing students on how much knowledge they can retain within a certain amount of time, and not enough on preparing them for the real world and their futures. 

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