EDCI 397
16 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mikynsi Steffan from EDCI397
Scoop.it!

Clean Beginnings | Scholastic.com

Clean Beginnings | Scholastic.com | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Hello and goodbye in a conversation. Good morning and good night with your family. An appetizer and a dessert at dinner. The sun rising and falling each day. What do all of these things have in common? They have a natural beginning and ending that the brain becomes conditioned to recognize. 
The brain prefers knowing the start and finish of a task. As teachers, it is our job to help the brain of each student function at maximum potential.  Creating a clean beginning and clean ending for our lesson, our day, our week, or our year helps the brain to stay efficient. Below I will highlight some of the fun and purposeful parts of our morning routine.
This post includes video examples of our morning routine. Stay tuned for a future post for examples of what happens at the end of the day.

Via Nicole Liebler
more...
Nicole Liebler's curator insight, March 28, 2014 3:29 PM

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

 

This may be the most unique and helpful source that I've found!  This teacher wrote a page on the morning routines he has established in his classroom and the purpose of each, serving to help students feel more united with one another, transfer their brains into a learning state, wake up their bodies and brains, and acknowledge their peers for good deeds. (The included video is adorable and really depicts the routines well!) Just like in another article I posted, I love that morning routine starts with the teacher greeting each student individually at the door. However, in this case, there is a short, special handshake the students need to do with the teacher to enter. Kids LOVE handshakes, and by doing these, teachers can establish stronger connections with students to make them feel safer and more accepted in the classroom. Another routine in this video that I will absolutely incorporate into my future classroom is a morning dance, especially because I love to dance. Students will benefit from this in many ways: waking up through movement, stimulating their brains with Oxygen, feeling unified in a whole-group activity, and starting the day off with a smile and enthusiasm. This will definitely support children by helping them feel more optimistic and healthy. Another routine I would love to incorporate from this video/article is "Nominations". I think it is a really special thing for kids to acknowledge good behaviors of others and share this publicly. It helps build communication skills, which is a component of resiliency. Another routine I liked is having the chosen student (one who was nominated for a good deed) flip the light on for the learning sign (or it can be flipping a sign from one side to the other) to signal that the environment is changing to a more serious learning environment where they must put on their thinking caps. I love that the students are the ones to take action and change it from a more upbeat environment to a learning one, rather than the teacher. This change would be effective to help calm down rowdy students and get them ready to focus. In general, I love how the students transition from one routine/activity to the next with songs/chants that were established and practiced early in the year. These are really nice ways to bring the class together and build a sense of community among students. I think it is important to have experiences and activities that are specific to that class because it makes it a more special community with a positive social climate.

Scooped by Mikynsi Steffan
Scoop.it!

Positive Classroom Climate | Center for Teaching and Learning

Positive Classroom Climate | Center for Teaching and Learning | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Mikynsi Steffan's insight:

I found this very informational on how to create a good classroom climate. I think that it would be very resourceful for new teachers because its very instructional and it was written for the purpose of informing education students. I like and agree with the six positive climate skills listed. I strongly agree that it is important to be sensitive to individual differences and that teachers who alter instruction to accommodate individual differences send a message. In a third grade classroom I observed the teacher allowed one student to do his classwork standing up because he could not sit still. The student had a great relationship with the teacher and truly respected her. I can not say so for sure, but one contributing factor to the positive relationship could have been from the teacher recognizing that he could not sit still and understanding. I really liked how the article mentioned that the teachers should feel free to arrange the classroom according to the method of instruction they are using. I like the idea that the classroom can be a changing environment. I think that the traditional view on how a classroom should look sets a lot of limitations on learning. Finally, I loved the idea of coming in early or staying after class to talk to students. I observed a middle school classroom where students were aloud to come sit with the teacher at lunch to just hangout. The students loved it. The school day does not provide ample opportunities to get to know students, teachers have to seize any opportunity that arises even if that means coming in early or giving up a lunch break. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikynsi Steffan
Scoop.it!

Project Based Learning | BIE

Project Based Learning | BIE | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Mikynsi Steffan's insight:

BIE.org is a great resource for teachers who are interested in project-based learning.  The website gives you an overview of project-based learning, as well as advice on how to plan and get started. It is also a great resource for educators who already are familiar with project-based learning giving ideas and examples of hundreds of amazing projects done in schools all over. As a future educator BIE.org is a resource that I plan on using when implementing project-based learning in my future classroom. I have already found so many amazing projects I would love to repeat in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikynsi Steffan
Scoop.it!

Using project-based learning to engage students with politics

Using project-based learning to engage students with politics | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Teacher John Bosselman explains how he devised a cross-curricular challenge – spanning citizenship, literature and art – to help students engage with complex social issues
Mikynsi Steffan's insight:

The project explained by high school teacher John Bosselman is one of my favorite examples of project-based learning that I have found so far. I personally feel so disconnected with politics. In school I recall learning a little about political parties and the voting system but not enough that I knew what I was doing the first time that I voted when I was eighteen. I didn’t realize that there were going to be so many things to vote for on the ballot. I have always felt like politics is something that you learn on your own or in higher education if it pertains to your major. That is why I really liked reading about this project; it was designed to get students involved with the issues going through the ballot in their community. It also was designed so that students could investigate what happens when citizens are not engaged in the process. I thought that was important because a lot of citizens are not involved in local politics and maybe if students learn how to get involved in politics and local issues they will as adult citizens. The project allowed students to recognize their own perspectives on the social issues going through the ballot, one of the issues discussed in the article was the abolition of the death penalty. I liked this project a lot because it covered several content areas in very meaningful ways. The students created a poem from the interviews they conducted with members of the community. They learned how to interview and ask meaningful question. They were taught local politics while aloud to express themselves through art in the form of a mural. I think that this is a good project for high school students all over. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikynsi Steffan
Scoop.it!

Pin by Linda @LooksLikeLanguage on Socially Speaking | Pinterest

Pin by Linda @LooksLikeLanguage on Socially Speaking | Pinterest | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
This Pin was discovered by Linda @LooksLikeLanguage. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.
Mikynsi Steffan's insight:

I really liked the image I found on Pintrest of the pentagon of social and emotional learning skills because I thought It was a great visual. The image is easy to read and understand dividing social and emotional learning skills into the five categories at each point of the pentagon. As a future teacher I think that it would be a great resource to refer to when creating lesson plans with the goal of  integrating social and emotional learning.  One section of the pentagon is self- awareness. It is very important for students to recognize and understand their feelings, while valuing their strengths and abilities. If I was teaching a science lesson on global warming I could refer to the pentagon and decide I want to include self-awareness in the lesson by asking students to express how they feel about the issue and why? I could also ask them to think of  valuable abilities they possess that could help them find solutions or prevent this problem. This could be done with any of the other categories in the pentagon,  self management, social awareness, relationship skills, and social-decision making. I believe that all of these parts are vital parts of  social and emotional learning and that is why I find this visual valuable. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikynsi Steffan
Scoop.it!

Are You Being Fair?

Are You Being Fair? | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Educators share tips for avoiding favoritism in the classroom.
Mikynsi Steffan's insight:

The article focuses on a very important issue in teaching, favoritism. I think that the reason its so vital is because teachers may be showing favoritism without even realizing it. It is important as teachers or future teachers to take a step back and evaluate how you interact with students, are you demonstrating favoritism towards some of your students? If so it is important to realize how it may affect students. I liked the quote in the article about how with favoritism teachers transmit different emotions to different students and how students absorb those emotions and interpret them which influence their feelings. I can personally relate to the article because I can remember on case in particular where a teacher showed favoritism towards a group of students in the class, I was not one of them. It was sixth grade math and I remember thinking that the teacher did not like me because of the way she treated some of the students in the class. The feeling of not being favored caused me to become very nervous around her because I wanted her to like me more, affecting my participation in the class. I didn't want to raise my hand and get a question wrong because I didn't want to embarrass myself in front of her. I think the article gives a lot of great ideas on how to be fair to all students in the class, avoiding showing any favoritism when calling on students. I can refer to them in the future. The article also brought up how important it is to praise all students if not on their academic work, find another reason. I will remember that in the future when I have a classroom full of students with different abilities. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikynsi Steffan
Scoop.it!

Elementary Project: Kindergarten Harvest - YouTube

Two Kindergarten classes from Explorer Elementary learn how to grow and harvest vegetables with the help a garden coordinator.
Mikynsi Steffan's insight:

The video brought up some very good points that I strongly agree with. I really liked how one of the educators in the video mentioned that children learn best through all of their senses. That is why the garden project is such a great experience for children because they were able to learn about plants through all of their senses. They were able to touch, smell, and even taste throughout the project. I also liked how she mentioned that it was a great opportunity for the children to work together. Social skills such as learning how to collaborate and work with others are very important to learn at a young age because you need those skills to be successful throughout life. I also really liked how each child had a small part of the garden that they were responsible for and that they were aloud to choose the seeds that they planted. I think that this probably made the project very personal and exciting for the children. I think that the garden project is a wonderful way to teach children about plants. I would use this project in my future classroom because I think that it teaches to the whole child and is a great experience for young children. 

more...
No comment yet.