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Curated by anne macleod
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Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It | edanne | Scoop.it

"You don’t mean to bore students. In fact, sometimes you’re downright interesting–the students are engaged, the buzz in the room is palpable, and even the hesitant students are asking questions. But the fact of the matter is, even the most charismatic and experienced teachers bore students sometimes. But the good news is, it may not be your fault."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 3, 2013 9:26 PM

This post begins with a quote from Plato who "advised against force-feeding of facts to students" (those are not his words, but his words follow this quote) and then moves to the present day and what we know about learning based on neuroscience research into learning. 

Read about how "stress and curiosity edits which sensory information", how the brain has evolved and must make choices about which information to process based on the multititude of "sensory information" being received. This system, the Reticular Activating System or RAS, determines what passes from the lower brainstem to the higher regions.

Other sections include how the brain receives threats and that when it is not under stress the brain is ready to be engaged and learn. Learn ways to work with students so they are engaged and learning, and willing to answer the question "What did you learn in school today?"

Audrey's comment, February 4, 2013 5:57 AM
Teaching is a two way process. Students of all ages should be encouraged to take a more active part in their learning. When students say to teachers "we want the lesson to be more fun". Why can students not explain what "fun" means? Why can they not demonstrate, using the learning materials how they would like the subject presented in a fun way?
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Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning

Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning | edanne | Scoop.it

What happens when you tell your students to "pay attention!" More than you may think. This post explores what goes on in the brain and ways the brain pays attention. Research is shared as well as what you can do in your classroom immediately as well what you can do in the long term.
Short term solutions include "using prediction; using the brief pause and chunk technique; priming the learning with small hints, appetizers and teasers" and more.

You may also choose to view a video of a session "Teaching with the Brain in Mind" at http://www.scilearn.com/company/webinars/ (you will need to scroll down the page to find the link).

 

Feed your child's whole brain with the biggest selection of inexpensive educational games, toys and books on the web!  Go to http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk


Via Beth Dichter, Audrey
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Debra Evans's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:08 PM

Useful

Ruth Virginia Barton's curator insight, February 13, 2015 10:37 AM

"Instead of saying to students, “Pay attention!” what you really want to say is, “Suppress interesting things!” Why? Students already DO pay attention."  The point being, prolonged attention paying is a learned skill, practiced.  Intersperse teaching with stand-up breaks, quick physical activity.  Create "hooks' for attention - previews - and offer rewards - like homework free pass this month - for students who get it right; helps them be invested in topic

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Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain

Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain | edanne | Scoop.it
Storytelling is one of the most overused and underused techniques at the same time. In this post, we are revealing what storytelling does to our brains.

Long before we had writing as we know it there has been an oral tradition of storytelling. This post looks at the science around storytelling.

Learn about how a story "can put your whole brain to work" and why "our brains become more active when we tell stories." Find out why the brain "learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases" and much more. If you enjoy telling stories, writing stories, or listening to stories check out this post to learn more!


Via Beth Dichter, Audrey
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Audrey's curator insight, December 19, 2012 4:15 PM

Just think about all the schemas (pockets of information) we have for everything we do.  Even though we have never taken part in many activities, we could easily build plausible stories based on those schemas and even devise theories, which may be testable. This is imagination which is one example of brain power, audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk

44Doors's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:27 AM

"Anything you’ve experienced, you can get others to experience the same. Or at least, get their brain areas that you’ve activated that way, active too:"

 

"use simple, yet heartfelt language."

"Quick last fact: Our brain learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases that used to make stories awesome"

Art Jones's curator insight, October 28, 2014 5:50 PM

"our brains become more active when we tell stories."