Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant
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Rescooped by Christine Davison from STEM in the Classsroom
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Five Ways to Get Girls into STEM

Five Ways to Get Girls into STEM | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
As a society, we learn about the world and advance our well being through science and engineering. The United States may be known around the world for its higher education, but compared to many other

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Common Core Literacy: Lucy Calkins-1, David Coleman-0

Common Core Literacy: Lucy Calkins-1, David Coleman-0 | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
The difference between reading an article or a book by Lucy Calkins and hearing her speak in person is a difference that cannot be measured in nuances; the difference is measured in hearing the dec...
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Rescooped by Christine Davison from Eclectic Technology
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The Digital Classroom | Online Universities

The Digital Classroom | Online Universities | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it

Throughout history, textbooks have been a burden to students: They're heavy, expensive and quickly out-of-date. However, technology is playing a  major role in how textbooks and education are changing as a whole. Check out this infographic for more information. 


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Internet-60-Seconds-Infographic-Part-2

Internet-60-Seconds-Infographic-Part-2 | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it

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de Bruijne Benjamin's comment, June 18, 2013 5:40 AM
Et dire que c'est la crise !
Jennifer Samuels's curator insight, June 21, 2013 7:40 PM

I'll have to check the sources, but it doesn't sound unreasonable.

Joshua Lipworth's curator insight, July 24, 2013 11:19 AM

This is great because of blah blah blah

Rescooped by Christine Davison from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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50 Make Use of Guides free download now in ePub format

50 Make Use of Guides free download now in ePub format | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it

50 Make Use of Guides free download now in ePub format


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Reverse Instruction Tools And Techniques (Part 1) | Emerging Education Technology

Reverse Instruction Tools And Techniques (Part 1) | Emerging Education Technology | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Applications and methods for creating and delivering digital course materials, so you can experiment with flipping the classroom.
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Movie - The Connected Generation~Watch entire movie online (FREE)

Movie - The Connected Generation~Watch entire movie online (FREE) | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it

Great movie to motivate all educators to realize that "the next generation will not be limited on how to do old things better, they will look at new things that have never been done before... Technoloogy is an extension of their learning tools... It’s no longer enough to be able to read and write, learning now requires multiple skills using digital technologies... We are witnessing evolution, in real time."

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Tip of the Week – Six Great Ways to Publish Student Work

Tip of the Week – Six Great Ways to Publish Student Work | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
We know that the world is moving online and that to prepare our kids for that world, we need to train them to use that world's tools.

We know that publishing student work beyond the classroom en...
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In schools, self-esteem boosting is losing favor to rigor, finer-tuned praise

In schools, self-esteem boosting is losing favor to rigor, finer-tuned praise | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
For decades, the prevailing wisdom in education was that high achievement would follow high self-esteem. Now that is being turned on its head.
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Rescooped by Christine Davison from EducationalTechnology
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Ken Robinson: Changing education paradigms | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson's celebrated TED talk in which he makes links between 3 troubling trends: rising drop-out rates, schools' dwindling stake in the arts, and ADHD. An important, timely talk for parents and teachers.


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Rescooped by Christine Davison from Generation STEM in the News
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Launching the Next New Frontier – STEM Education

Launching the Next New Frontier – STEM Education | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it

by Paul Pineiro

STEM education is often cited as the next great frontier for America - a new, New Land where innovation can reinvigorate the economy and provide opportunities for all young people to thrive and not just survive. Despite a clarion call from the White House in 2011 to get “all hands on deck” for STEM, the ship does not have enough qualified crew. The most important thing we can do as a nation right now is to build and sustain an aggressively ambitious feeder system, pre-k through 12th grade. We've got to face the reality that graduates with majors in STEM fields such as engineering, science, math, computer science and technology, are not attracted to teach. Why would they be? STEM majors currently lead to the top ten highest paying salaries out of college (www.payscale.com), salaries that pay significantly greater than the education jobs which rank at the very bottom. There is the added drawback that math, science and computer science majors may not want to enter a field (education) at a time when teachers are so publicly decried. In this climate, state and local funding for the recruitment and retention of highly skilled STEM educators does not seem likely. Enter President Obama’s Federal STEM Education 5-Year Strategic Plan (2013), a framework for the Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM). Among the key aspects of this Plan are developing a STEM Master Teacher Corps ($35 million) and funding STEM Teacher Pathways ($80 Million). The administration’s priorities, as outlined in the budget request, align with the five priority areas identified in the strategic plan: K-12 instruction; undergraduate education; graduate education; broadening participation in STEM education and careers; and informal education and out-of-school time. While there are supports coming out of this plan, significant commitment of resources struggles to gain traction in Washington. Even if the President's call for STEM support received stronger support, differentiated pay to attract STEM majors would have has its own unionized hill to climb. It's time to more widely implement innovative options that are already in place. Dual-credit courses offer college and high school credit for exceptional learners who go out to labs for applied learning experiences in authentic settings. These have been around for a long time but let’s make a high school level version of these courses not for college credit but for high school credit. Let’s open them up to all students interested in pursuing college majors and careers in STEM fields. We need more students pursuing STEM coursework so why limit the opportunities to only a small, select population? It is extremely likely that some outstanding, non-traditionally exceptional students will go on to be brilliant innovators. We can preserve the college content and rigor for the dual-credit courses while at the same time having similar educational experiences for more kids. (www.students2science.org,/ for example). Increasing access to STEM coursework would also give the underrepresented populations such as women, Hispanic and Black students a chance to solidify their fragile interests in fields that seem intended for others. How many Nobel Prize winners have we missed by not finding ways to foster self-efficacy in these disciplines for all students? In an off-campus, in-lab model, more students could take advantage of authentic lab-based experiences in the private sector; but, not all experts are necessarily pedagogically savvy. Education training would be needed. Such training would not require years of study. Learning techniques for checking student understanding and differentiation for various learning styles would be the most necessary skills. Instructional design skills would be attainable due to the nature of problem-based, real-world STEM activities. With the help of a school-based teacher consultant, this career-based teacher would have an ideal blend of expertise and pedagogy. Such an arrangement would benefit so many more students and not just the top few percent of a given school. And what about private companies? What makes it worthwhile for them to host such a program? New hires could receive the basic training in pedagogy and work part-time with the students. With a little bit of curriculum development support from the sending school, the skills called for in a course could be aligned with existing company projects. These new hires might serve as outreach teachers for a minimum or indefinite period of time. Private companies would be grooming the next generations for the jobs they will need to fill. Whether or not they track the students through college or offer them incentives or scholarships to come back, the efforts are still helping to prepare a larger population of qualified, future STEM employees who can experience higher rigor in college due to these high school experiences. And what about STEM education within the schools? Hiring STEM experts as school-based teachers is difficult because of collectively bargained pay scales. These scales traditionally do not differentiate by course content or national demand. We should allow exceptionally highly qualified teachers (with very specifically designated credentials) to receive pay that is above and beyond the collectively bargained contract scale. These dollars could come from federal and state grant money (such as the President Obama’s proposed STEM funding) or from local donations from community Education Funds, private business, etc. Now is the time for America to do what it has done so well in the past – discover and leverage new frontiers. But it's clear we need to do so on a massive scale and with many creative and varying perspectives. It's been said that the STEM movement needs "all hands on deck." Let’s extend that metaphor just a bit. A small team of existing experts may be able to build the most sophisticated ship to sale the seas, but will we have enough qualified sailors to steer it? We have tremendous available resources of human capital in our schools; if these resources go untapped, our ship may remain floating aimlessly, hoping by chance to reach America's next frontier. We need to do better than just wait and hope. We need to nurture the innate curiosity of our young students and make their classrooms laboratories of trial and error, not test centers for passing and failing. We need to support curious young minds with hands-on applied middle school math and high school labs that don’t affirm what’s in the textbook but instead stimulate thoughts about what’s not in there. And for this, they need physical resources and expert educators to launch them.


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Paul Pineiro's curator insight, June 9, 2014 5:22 PM
Now is the time for America to do what it has done so well in the past – discover and leverage new frontiers. But it's clear we need to do so on a massive scale and with many creative and varying perspectives.
casslyn foxworth's curator insight, July 9, 2017 10:41 AM

Pineiro, Paul. "Launching the Next New Frontier – STEM Education." Generation Stem into the News 9 June 2014. Web.

 

Schools should implement duel-credit courses for students interested in STEM programs. This will help with their development in these career fields.

Rescooped by Christine Davison from Eclectic Technology
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How to Make an Infographic

How to Make an Infographic | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Hello, World! Lots of my friends have been asking me how I make the infographics. I find it very simple. But, I admit that that simple mindset is after hundreds of hours playing with Piktochart. I ...

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Dean J. Fusto's comment, September 8, 2013 11:13 AM
Thanks for posting this...I'll try it soon.
Marteana Davidson's comment, September 8, 2013 9:41 PM
I'm going to try this with my production report on hour my facility is used each year!
Piktochart's comment, September 26, 2013 2:15 AM
Hi Kimberly! Thanks for thumbs up!
Also we ask teachers to fill a survey that could help us to improve. Maybe you could find a few minutes to fill it yourself and pass to other teachers who use it? Thanks!
ow.ly/oJahy
Rescooped by Christine Davison from Eclectic Technology
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Internet-60-Seconds-Infographic-Part-2

Internet-60-Seconds-Infographic-Part-2 | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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de Bruijne Benjamin's comment, June 18, 2013 5:40 AM
Et dire que c'est la crise !
Jennifer Samuels's curator insight, June 21, 2013 7:40 PM

I'll have to check the sources, but it doesn't sound unreasonable.

Joshua Lipworth's curator insight, July 24, 2013 11:19 AM

This is great because of blah blah blah

Rescooped by Christine Davison from Eclectic Technology
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Top 10 things teachers need to STOP DOING!

Top 10 things teachers need to STOP DOING! | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Education reform is something just about everyone agrees is needed, but the hard work is done in the field by teachers, administrators, and support staff. Here are some things that improve educatio...

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The Hole in the Wall Project and the Power of Self-Organized Learning | Edutopia

The Hole in the Wall Project and the Power of Self-Organized Learning | Edutopia | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Sugata Mitra's Hole in the Wall project showed that children could teach themselves, and each other, how to use technology.
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Rescooped by Christine Davison from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Here Are The 17 Radical Ideas From Google's Top Genius Conference That Could Change The World

Here Are The 17 Radical Ideas From Google's Top Genius Conference That Could Change The World | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Brilliant....

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Teacher’s recommendations for academic uses of 5 fun free presentation tools | Emerging Education Technology

Teacher’s recommendations for academic uses of 5 fun free presentation tools | Emerging Education Technology | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Course participants offer their ideas about ways to use these fun free tools in instructional situations and other academic applications.
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Part 1: Flipping The Classroom? … 12 Resources To Keep You On Your Feet

Part 1: Flipping The Classroom? … 12 Resources To Keep You On Your Feet | Of Interest to a Digital Immigrant | Scoop.it
Welcome to another post rich in resources. If you have come here looking for links that will guide you to videos and multimedia to use in a Flipped Classroom that is coming in a future post. Perhap...
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