Economics
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Rescooped by Niall Duffy from Pobre Gutenberg
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The new economics of media: If you want free content, there's an almost infinite supply

The new economics of media: If you want free content, there's an almost infinite supply | Economics | Scoop.it
Freelance writer Nate Thayer touched off a debate this week about media outlets wanting to publish content for free — but the reality is that the economics of content have changed forever, and the supply of free content is almost infinite.

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Rescooped by Niall Duffy from Gold and What Moves it.
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Demand for Gold Coins Goes Through the Proverbial Roof

Demand for Gold Coins Goes Through the Proverbial Roof | Economics | Scoop.it

Similar to everything else financial, gold bullion prices follow the same main premise of economics: prices rise when demand increases, and prices decline when the supply increases.

 

At present, on the demand side, we have central banks buying gold bullion. In fact, they have turned into big buyers, collectively buying the most gold in 49 years in 2012. Central banks are buying gold bullion because they need it, as the fiat currencies they created are causing great havoc to their reserves. In these pages, it is very well documented which central banks are buying. What is interesting is that the list of gold bullion purchasers is increasing.

 

Demand from individual investors for gold bullion is also increasing. In the first three months of 2013, the U.S. Mint sold about 40% more gold bullion coins than it did in the first quarter of 2012. It sold 292,500 ounces in coins of gold bullion from January to March of this year, compared to 210,500 in the same period of 2012. (Source: The United States Mint web site, last accessed April 2, 2013.)

 

Now, for the supply side of the story; worldwide gold bullion production from mines in 2012 totaled 2,700 tons. Compared to 2011, the increase in gold mined was a menial 1.5% in 2012. (Source: “Mineral Commodity Summaries,” U.S. Geological Survey web site, January 2013, last accessed April 3, 2013.) ...


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Hal's curator insight, April 4, 2013 9:08 AM

So why are we slipping lower this week?