Ecology
10 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by diego de vidts
Scoop.it!

Guerrilla Gardening - Greening public spaces.

Guerrilla Gardening - Greening public spaces. | Ecology | Scoop.it
Guerrilla Gardening - Greening Public Spaces. Gardening on public property without permission aka "Guerrilla Gardening" is an initiative to  green public, run down spaces, bringing communities...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

National Ecology Center botanic greenhouses by Grimshaw and Samoo

National Ecology Center botanic greenhouses by Grimshaw and Samoo | Ecology | Scoop.it
Architecture firm Grimshaw has completed an ecological park in South Korea where tropical plants, waterfalls and penguins are housed within huge glass and steel biomes (+ slideshow). (more...)

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Deepening (Not Just) Food Democracy
Scoop.it!

Bioversity International to award best film on agricultural biodiversity

Bioversity International to award best film on agricultural biodiversity | Ecology | Scoop.it

Festival delle Terre returns to Rome this year (7-10 May), showcasing a series of environmental documentaries from the eyes of those on the ground. Bioversity International will be awarding a prize to the best film on agricultural biodiversity.


Via MJ Chappell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Edible insects
Scoop.it!

Nutritional Ecology of Entomophagy in Human and Other Primates

Annu. Rev. Entomol. 2013. 58:141–60
Abstract :
Entomophagy is widespread among nonhuman primates and is common among many human communities. However, the extent and patterns of entomophagy vary substantially both in humans and nonhuman primates. Here we synthesize the literature to examine why humans and other primates eat insects and what accounts for the variation in the extent to which they do so. Variation in the availability of insects is clearly important, but less understood is the role of nutrients in entomophagy. We apply a multidimensional analytical approach, the right-angled mixture triangle, to published data on the macronutrient compositions of insects to address this. Results showed that insects eaten by humans spanned a wide range of protein-to-fat ratios but were generally nutrient dense, whereas insects with high protein-to-fat ratios were eaten by nonhuman primates. Although suggestive, our survey exposes a need for additional, standardized, data.


Via Jacques Mignon, John N. Kinyuru
more...
Jacques Mignon's curator insight, January 17, 2013 3:39 AM

David Raubenheimer and Jessica M. Rothman

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Art and learning
Scoop.it!

What is arts-based research? « expressions of an intimate ecology

What is arts-based research? « expressions of an intimate ecology | Ecology | Scoop.it
In the previous post/article (re: art influencing science) I championed the efficacy and appropriateness of interdisciplinary arts-based research and practice, as opposed to merely quantitative or empirical scientific methodology ...

Via Rachel Lovie, Megan Jean Burson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Ecology Year 10
Scoop.it!

Reducing numbers of 1 carnivore species indirectly leads to extinction of others | e! Science News

Previous studies have shown that carnivores can have indirect positive effects on each other, which means that when one species is lost, others could soon follow.

Via Steve Martin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Energy, ecology, and economics revisited | A Prosperous Way Down

Energy, ecology, and economics revisited | A Prosperous Way Down | Ecology | Scoop.it
Perhaps it is time to revisit Odum's classic principles of net energy through some current examples.

Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from SCImago on Media
Scoop.it!

Community Ecology

Community Ecology | Ecology | Scoop.it

"Trends in Ecology and Evolution is a reputable journal, with an H index of 199. It is part of a larger system of journals published  by Elsevier, called Trends. It is now the most-cited journal in ecology and evolutionary biology, with over 16,000 citations per document in 2012. The number of citations have been increasing since the journal’s inception in 1986 (SCImago). This article was published in 2002. While this is not extremely recent, it is still relevant to studying ecology today because of the relative consistent nature of plant communities over time. It relates to our broader topic of ecology by zooming into the impacts that non-native plants have on communities and then back out to how those altered communities influence cultural, societal, and economic interactions."


Via scimago
more...
scimago's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:49 AM

SITUATING THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT (USA) - 09 SEP 2013

Sofia Koutzoukis, Gabe Kohler, Rebecca Kidder, Luke Trimble

Rescooped by diego de vidts from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Ecology and Planning Museum by Steven Holl in Tianjin, China's New Eco-City

Ecology and Planning Museum by Steven Holl in Tianjin, China's New Eco-City | Ecology | Scoop.it

Steven Holl Architects has been commissioned to design the Ecology and Planning Museum in Tianjin,China – the new Eco-City is planned the to be the home to population of 500,000 when completed in 2020. 60,000 square meters in total, the museum structure will be the first in the cultural district.

 

Marking the entrance to the Planning Museum, shared public plaza gathers the visitors around the large model of the eco-city and a temporary display area, further directed to the exquisite space experience of great interiors and program sequences. The top storey facilitates the green architecture, landscape and water resources exhibits and the access to the vegetative rooftop, offering panoramic views to the future city.

Interconnected by underground service zone area and further connected to the central business district of Eco-City by a high speed tram, this museum development represents the initial space experience of the cultural district of this “poster-city for state-of-the-art sustainable aspects”, rising from the Bohai Bay...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Systems ecology: DNA sequencing and genomics on the high seas

Systems ecology: DNA sequencing and genomics on the high seas | Ecology | Scoop.it

How Eric Karsenti's quest to understand the cell launched a trip around the world. The project, called Tara Oceans, set sail from Lorient, France, in September 2009 for a 115,000-kilometre voyage to collect plankton — microscopic marine organisms — at 154 distinct sites around the world. Findings from the expedition are now starting to be published, and the bulk of the data will soon be made publicly available.

 

Although other surveys, such as the 2004–06 Global Ocean Sampling Expedition, piloted by genomics impresario Craig Venter, have sampled microscopic life in the seas, the Tara Oceans project is taking a broader approach — to “study it all”. Instead of focusing only on microbes, the scientists collected billions of organisms, from millimetre-scale zooplankton down to viruses 100,000 times smaller.

 

These marine organisms exert tremendous power over the planet, collectively forming a giant engine that drives the cycling of elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Photosynthetic marine microbes produce about as much of the world's oxygen as do land plants. Ocean ecosystems are also hives of evolutionary activity in which countless viruses shuttle genes between organisms.

 

Understanding how these complex marine ecosystems work requires a holistic approach, says Karsenti. Tara Oceans scientists are identifying the plankton through a range of techniques including genomics, proteomics and automated high-throughput imaging. To link the organisms to their environments, the researchers also measured properties such as the temperature, pH and salinity of the water around each sample, which they plan to cross-reference with the biological data.

 

Although the project is limited by its ability to sample areas at only one time, “the data they collect could be used in revolutionary ways”, says Jack Gilbert, a microbial ecologist at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. By working out how the different plankton species interact with each other and the environment, the Tara Oceans project members hope to understand how ecosystems emerge from the sum of the interactions between their parts. This huge data set, they say, will help researchers to tackle big issues, such as calculating the biodiversity in the oceans, predicting how marine organisms will respond to environmental shifts and, perhaps, gaining insight into how evolution acts on networks of organisms in ecosystems or of molecules in cells.

 

Beyond the big numbers, the team is working to deduce potential ecological relationships. Seeing which organisms occur alongside others in samples, for example, can suggest possible interactions. Hiroyuki Ogata, a Tara Project collaborator and microbiologist at the Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology in Marseille, France, and his team dug through Tara Oceans data and found that a family of giant viruses called Megaviridae occurred alongside filamentous organisms known as oomycetes. Evidence of gene transfer between the two organisms gives the first hints, say the researchers, that oomycetes might be hosts for giant viruses. Karsenti says that such discoveries show how Tara Oceans data could help to unpick the parasitic and symbiotic relationships that have shaped evolution in the ocean.

 

Tara Oceans is now taking part in an arctic sampling mission, and scientists around the world will be able to access data from its first global circuit later this year, when the raw sequences, together with the environmental measurements, will be released in an open-access database hosted by the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute in Hinxton, UK.

 

Researchers will then be able to compare the Tara Oceans data with results from other large marine surveys, such as Venter's Global Ocean Sampling Expedition and Spain's 2010–11 Malaspina project, which focused on samples from deep marine ecosystems. They can also compare the data with the plethora of smaller, more local marine-ecological studies that sample the same area over time so that scientists can see how the ecosystems change. Gilbert says that it is crucial that the data from Tara Oceans be viewed in the context of other longitudinal studies, because the static view from a single voyage is limited. “This has always been the criticism of these kinds of biogeographic surveys,” he says.

 

Robert Friedman, chief operating officer at the J. Craig Venter Institute in San Diego, California, agrees: “For us to truly understand the oceans, one was not sufficient; two is probably not sufficient. We're going to need many more.”

Karsenti hopes other researchers will take up that challenge and that some of them will, as he did, step outside their comfort zones to do so. Today's cell and developmental biologists, he suggests, should look beyond their yeasts, fruitflies and mice, and observe the extraordinary creatures inhabiting the seas. Perhaps future cell biologists will look first to the oceans, inspired by the tale of a sailor who peered into the heart of a single cell and caught a glimpse of the world.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

ESSAY: Ecology Is the Meaning of Life: Embracing A Sense of "Enoughness"

ESSAY: Ecology Is the Meaning of Life: Embracing A Sense of "Enoughness" | Ecology | Scoop.it
EcoEarth.Info is a portal and search engine that promotes environmental sustainability public policy; including climate, forests, water and oceans.

 

Dr. Glen Barry, Ocober 20, 2013

The natural Earth is a marvel – a complex coupling of species within ecosystems, whereby life begets life.

Ecology is far more than the study of life and its environment. The word is used here as a synonym for ecosystems – the vibrant connections that emerge between species across scales, which cumulatively make life on Earth possible.

Nature is far, far more than pretty plants and animals. Ecosystems make Earth habitable, providing water, food, air, shelter, and more – everything that we need and desire to live well. In naturally evolved ecosystems, from genes to individual organisms and species, to ecosystems and everything else in between, each living being present fulfills a niche which sustains itself, its neighbors, and the whole.

All species uniquely express evolutionary brilliance and have a purpose, a reason for being, a right to exist, and are necessary to maintain life’s full potential. From the lowly worm to soaring eagles, to the human race – all naturally evolved life has value and relies upon all the rest. Even seemingly noxious disease organisms and man-eating predators have a role to play in maintaining ecological balance.

Humankind’s demand for resources and growth overwhelms nature, our steady diminishment of ecosystems abruptly changes climate, and this is collapsing the biosphere. Global ecosystems – water, air, food, forests, oceans, wetlands, and more – are collapsing and dying under the burden of human industrial and population growth.... http://www.ecoearth.info/blog/2013/10/essay_ecology_is_the_meaning_o.asp

 

 ▶  WHY CHOOSING NATURE WILL ONLY ADVANCE HUMAN SOCIETIES http://sco.lt/6odAoL

 

▶  WEB-OF-LIFE UNRAVELLING - HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS VITAL FOR ALL PLANETARY LIFE http://sco.lt/8idD7J

 

▶  WHY THE ECONOMY NEEDS NATURE http://sco.lt/6WP6On

 

▶  ECO-SPIRITUALITY: TOWARDS A VALUES-BASED ECONOMIC STRUCTURE http://sco.lt/7tcgQj

 

                                                  VIDEO

▶  "ENOUGHNESS: RESTORING BALANCE TO THE ECONOMY  http://sco.lt/55TwvJ

 

 

Treehugger, October 21, 2013
▶ CAN TRANSITION TOWNS HELP CREATE A NEW ECONOMY http://www.treehugger.com/economics/transition-towns-new-economy.html

▶ VIDEO http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKN3RLkEGfM#t=106

 

▶  THE NEW COOPERATIVE WAY TO A FLOURISHING FUTURE: SELF-SUFFICIENT COMMUNITIES - AN ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM  http://sco.lt/80kwjZ

 

THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY: COULD IT PRESENT A NEW WAY OF DOING BUSINESS?  http://sco.lt/6VI4aP

 

THE CRISIS OF CIVILISATION IS AN UNPRECEDENTED OPPORTUNITY:  BUSINESS-AS-USUAL IS NOT SUSTAINABLE http://sco.lt/8wpytt

 

                                                      WATCH

                                 "THE STORY OF SOLUTIONS"

                      Latest from Annie Leonard's "Story of Stuff"

                                 Resolving the "Game of More"

                   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpkRvc-sOKk

 

 

 

 

 February 20, 2013 Guardian Sustainable Business

THICH NHAT HANH:

▶  BEYOND ENVIRONMENT: FALLING BACK IN LOVE WITH MOTHER EARTH http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business/zen-thich-naht-hanh-buddhidm-business-values?intcmp=239

 

                                                 VIDEO

September 5, 2013 Treehugger
▶  UNTIL WE GRIEVE, WE'LL NEVER PROTECT THE EARTH

We'll protect what we fall in love with, that's the premise behind this video on the stunning beauty of pollination.

http://www.treehugger.com/endangered-species/until-we-grieve-well-never-protect-earth.html

 

 26 August 2010 Guardian - Living Our Values

THICH NHAT HAHN: 

▶  ZEN AND THE ART OF PROTECTING THE PLANET: In Rare Interview with zen buddhist master Thay warns of the threat to civilisation from climate change and the spiritual revival that is needed to avert catastrophe http://www.theguardian.com/sustainability/environment-zen-buddhism-sustainability

 

Jan 21, 2013 Guardian Sustainable Business

THICH NHAT HANH: 

▶  ONLY LOVE CAN SAVE US FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

Leading spiritual teacher Thay suggests that our search for fame, wealth, power and sexual gratification provides the perfect refuge for people to hide from the truth about the many challenges facing the world. Worse still, our addiction to material goods and a hectic lifestyle provides only a temporary plaster for gaping emotional and spiritual wounds, which only drives greater loneliness and unhappiness..... http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business/zen-master-thich-nhat-hanh-love-climate-change

 

March 23, 3012 -  The Ecologist

THICH NHAT HANH

▶  MAYBE IN 100 YEARS THERE WILL BE NO MORE HUMANS ON THE PLANET   http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health/p/1474669518/thich-nhat-hanh-maybe-in-100-years-there-will-be-no-more-humans-on-the-planet-the-ecologist

 

 

 

▶  BLOG -----AN URGENT MEMO TO THE WORLD http://ow.ly/n97Vf

 

▶ENOUGHNESS : WESTERN THOUGHT vs INDIGENOUS PHILOSOPHY http://sco.lt/6EFbPt

 

 

SEE:

▶▶ Biodiversity IS Life  – #Conservation #Ecosystems #Wildlife #Rivers #Forests #Environment by @pdjmoo  http://sco.lt/8D8NuL

 

▶▶ OUR OCEANS NEED US by @pdjmoo  http://sco.lt/6wow1R

 

▶▶ CLIMATE CHANGE WILL IMPACT US ALL by @pdjmoo http://sco.lt/7Myakz

 

 

                                                     WATCH

                                         ▶  FILM: ***"HOME"

                    An Exquisite Dedication To the Stewards of Our Planet

      http://thenaturaleye.wordpress.com/2011/03/26/home-an-exquisite-story-of-our-world/

 

 


Via pdjmoo, SustainOurEarth
more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:07 PM

This is beyond so many people's comprehension.

pdjmoo's curator insight, October 5, 2014 3:57 AM

                                   FOLLOW MY SCOOPITs


▶  BIODIVERSITY IS LIFE http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life


▶  OUR OCEANS NEED US http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us


 ▶ CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health


▶  CLIMATE CHANGE WILL IMPACT US ALL http://www.scoop.it/t/changingplanet


▶   OUR FOOD, OUR HEALTH http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides

Rescooped by diego de vidts from News in english
Scoop.it!

#Corruption in #Peru Aids Cutting of Rain Forest #ecology #environnement

#Corruption in #Peru Aids Cutting of Rain Forest #ecology #environnement | Ecology | Scoop.it
The World Bank estimates that 80 percent of Peru’s logging exports are illegally harvested, a problem compounded by bribery and obstacles to prosecution.

Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
more...
Juan Carlos Hernandez's curator insight, October 19, 2013 9:52 AM

#Corruption in #Peru Aids Cutting of Rain Forest #ecology #environnement

Val's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:48 AM

Afraid the police would tip off suspects, Francisco Berrospi kept local officers in the dark when he headed into the rain forest as a prosecutor to investigate illegal logging. Sometimes it hardly seemed to matter, though.

Even when he managed to seize trucks, chain saws or illegally harvested trees, judges would often force him to give them back, he said. Bribes were so common, he said, that one anticorruption official openly encouraged him to take them.

“The power of the logging industry here is very strong,” Mr. Berrospi said. “The corruption is terrible.”

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Political Ecology: Mapping the Shale Gas Boom

Political Ecology: Mapping the Shale Gas Boom | Ecology | Scoop.it
Where in the United States is fracking unlocking natural gas from shale rock?

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Candy Copeland's curator insight, November 8, 2013 5:08 PM

Many communities are fighting fracking.  In Texas a man sued oil company and the oil company lost so they conter sued the man for defamation.  Parts of Colorado have recently passed laws to keep fracking out of their communities.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:53 PM

In class we studied "fracking," or the fracturing of shale deep in the Earth with blasts of fluid, which produces a harvestable oil yield and much pollution to aquifers in the area.  I live at a house sometimes, where the water is rusty- and it really prevents me from doing much of anything with the water.  I can't cook with it, I can't shower in it, I can't drink it, I have to use bottled water to even brush my teeth because the simple rust content is so vile.  I cannot even imagine what the industrial acid- hydrochloric acid, as well as other contaminants in the water- would do to the water someone relies on...  I think of situations where neighbors trees are dangling over someone else's property, and how branches may be required to be cut down because of their interference with neighboring property, and I would hope that something can be done about protection of aquifers, along the same times... If there is something negative or unwanted affecting someone's water, something really should be done about it.  Knowing that there are negative consequences that come along with fracking, I really can't fathom why people do it!  I live in a protected watershed area in Scituate that does not allow development of any kind on one side of the road because of the Scituate Reservoir.  People are not allowed in the Reservoir Property at all, let alone not allowed to dump waste or cause any sort of harm to the environment, because a huge portion of the state of RI gets their water from that reservoir.  I am not an absolute tree-hugger, but I also don't think that such problematic activites should be 'stirred up' in areas that affect something that humans rely on and need to survive.  While I see that I am not affected by these shale fracking ops as are indicated on the map, I also DO care about the peope in those areas! Why should they be subjected to such putrification of their water resources?  I am once again perplexed by the darkness of humanity.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 3:48 PM

This was a very interesting topic to read about,  its clear the issue of fracking has so many cracks to it(haha). While whats occuring is completly unnatural, the economic forces behind it are clear, this is a big way to help give amercans cheeper gas. However the effects it has locally are increadibly destuctive and will likely have futher consiquences as fracking continues. I noticed by looking at this map that policialy it seem like fracking is occuring in the red states, seems they want to use there land for the resouces even though it might destroy. While politicaly librals want to protect there enviorments of there blue states. This really adds anouther levle to it and how the placment of these new gas companys is panning out arcosss america.

Scooped by diego de vidts
Scoop.it!

Environment and Human Health, Inc.’s New Flame-Retardant Report Calls for Sweeping Policy Changes | ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS

Environment and Human Health, Inc.’s New Flame-Retardant Report Calls for Sweeping Policy Changes | ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS | Ecology | Scoop.it
New Haven, Conn. (PRWEB) November 06, 2013 Environment and Human Health, Inc.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

IdeasLabs 2012 - Sandy Pentland - Sustainable Digital Ecology

Alex (Sandy) Pentland, MIT, gives a key insight into the concept of Sustainable Digital Ecology. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 5, 2013 7:06 AM

Great talk by Sandy Pentland. I highly recommend that you watch this video. Food for thoughts. 

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Home Sweet Biome
Scoop.it!

Aquatic Biomes Freshwater | Biology | Ecology

Purchase this DVD here http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program: Aquatic Biomes: Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, and Wetlands. DVD Description Our A...

Via Julie McManus
more...
Julie McManus's curator insight, May 13, 2013 8:26 PM

Freshwater aquatic biome explained in a VIDEO

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Home Sweet Biome
Scoop.it!

Biomes Savanna | Biology | Ecology

Purchase DVD here http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program: Terrestrial Biomes: Deserts, Grasslands, and Forests. DVD Description Our Terre...

Via Julie McManus
more...
Julie McManus's curator insight, May 13, 2013 8:25 PM

Savanna is explained in a VIDEO

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Biology
Scoop.it!

nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Understanding Biodiversity Patterns in Nature: It Takes Two Fields--Ecology and Evolutionary Biology - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Understanding Biodiversity Patterns in Nature: It Takes Two Fields--Ecology and Evolutionary Biology - US National Science Foundation (NSF) | Ecology | Scoop.it
Understanding Biodiversity Patterns in Nature: It Takes Two Fields--Ecology and Evolutionary Biology: What do ... http://t.co/OC6pUkA3hA

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera , Clarence Lim
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from AB.Eco
Scoop.it!

Loss of trees linked to higher death rates in humans

Loss of trees linked to higher death rates in humans | Ecology | Scoop.it
"Maybe we want to start thinking of trees as part of our public health infrastructure," says one U.S. Forest Service researcher.

Via Anita Woodruff, Alessandro
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

A new digital ecology is evolving, and humans are being left behind

A new digital ecology is evolving, and humans are being left behind | Ecology | Scoop.it
Incomprehensible computer behaviors have evolved out of high-frequency stock trading, and humans aren't sure why. Eventually, it could start affecting high-tech warfare, too.

Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Unregulated, agricultural ammonia threatens national parks' ecology

Unregulated, agricultural ammonia threatens national parks' ecology | Ecology | Scoop.it

Thirty-eight U.S. national parks are experiencing "accidental fertilization" at or above a critical threshold for ecological damage, according to a study published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics and led by Harvard University researchers. Unless significant controls on ammonia emissions are introduced at a national level, they say, little improvement is likely between now and 2050.


Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from News in english
Scoop.it!

End Ecocide in Europe: A Citizens’ Initiative to give the Earth Rights #ecology #petition

End Ecocide in Europe: A Citizens’ Initiative to give the Earth Rights #ecology #petition | Ecology | Scoop.it

Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
more...
Juan Carlos Hernandez's curator insight, August 24, 2013 4:14 PM

End Ecocide in Europe: A Citizens’ Initiative to give the Earth Rights #ecology #petition

WikiRendum's curator insight, August 25, 2013 5:04 AM

We invite the European Commission to adopt legislation to prohibit, prevent and pre-empt Ecocide, the extensive damage, destruction to or loss of ecosystems.

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Virology News
Scoop.it!

PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology

PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology | Ecology | Scoop.it

Viruses have generally been studied either as disease-causing infectious agents that have a negative impact on the host (most eukaryote-infecting viruses), or as tools for molecular biology (especially bacteria-infecting viruses, or phage). Virus ecology looks at the more complex issues of virus-host-environment interactions. For plant viruses this includes studies of plant virus biodiversity, including viruses sampled directly from plants and from a variety of other environments; how plant viruses impact species invasion; interactions between plants, viruses and insects; the large number of persistent viruses in plants that may have epigenetic effects; and viruses that provide a clear benefit to their plant hosts (mutualists). Plants in a non-agricultural setting interact with many other living entities such as animals, insects, and other plants, as well as their physical environment. Wild plants are almost always colonized by a number of microbes, including fungi, bacteria and viruses. Viruses may impact any of these interactions [1].


Via Ed Rybicki
more...
Ed Rybicki's curator insight, May 24, 2013 9:12 AM

Nice, reasoned review on something most human and animal virologists take no notice of whatsoever...B-)  OK, she does have "Plant Virus Biodiveristy" as her first heading, but hey, I misspelled my own name on my second paper when referring to my first!

 

The bottom line is that we notice plant viruses when they do things to our crop plants or companion plants - and not when they are in their natural (read: non-agricultural / horticultural) setting.  As Marilyn points out, plant viruses may interact with plant host, insect vector and humans - and with other pathogens and commensals and symbionts, making for a potentially VERY complex ecosystem.

 

Interestingly, "wild" plant viruses often cause persistent infections, and are efficiently transmitted vertically - and may even, as in the begomovirus-infected Abutilon, give rise to a pleasing phenotype that has resulted in spread, via cultivation, around the world.

 

The world needs more plant virologists.  It certainly has enough plant viruses!

Rescooped by diego de vidts from Glossarissimo!
Scoop.it!

(EN) - Ecology Dictionary | ecologydictionary.org

(EN) - Ecology Dictionary | ecologydictionary.org | Ecology | Scoop.it

"Welcome to EcologyDictionary.org, the place to know the words you want to put into action! 

Strictly speaking Ecology is the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environments. Nowadays our minds are rightly occupied with nature preservation issues when hearing "ecological" or "environmental". Our earth needs action, not words. Still we believe here at EcologyDictionary.org, that information and right use of words is one of the basics tools to raise ecology awareness.
EcologyDictionary.org offers you access to a wealth of terms related to ecology and environment, from the most common terms to the most technical jargon. Discover the meaning of ecology terms with ..."

 


Via Stefano KaliFire
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diego de vidts from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

British Columbia: Sardine fishery collapse affects economy, ecology | Vancouver Sun

British Columbia: Sardine fishery collapse affects economy, ecology | Vancouver Sun | Ecology | Scoop.it
A $32-million commercial fishery has inexplicably and completely collapsed this year on the B.C. coast.The sardine seine fleet has gone home after failing to catch a single fish. And the commercial disappearance of the small schooling fish is having repercussions all the way up the food chain to threatened humpback whales.

 

Jim Darling, a Tofino-based whale biologist with the Pacific Wildlife Foundation, said in an interview Monday that humpbacks typically number in the hundreds near the west coast of Vancouver Island in summer. They were observed only sporadically this year, including by the commercial whalewatching industry.

 

"Humpbacks are telling us that something has changed," he said. "Ocean systems are so complex, it's really hard to know what it means. For one year, I don't think there's any reason to be alarmed, but there is certainly reason to be curious."

 

Humpbacks instead were observed farther offshore, possibly feeding on alternative food sources such as herring, sandlance, anchovies, or krill, but not in the numbers observed near shore in recent years.

 

The sardine, also known as pilchard, has a uniquely fascinating history.

 

Sardines supported a major fishery on the B.C. coast in the mid-1920s to mid-1940s that averaged 40,000 tonnes a year.

 

Then the fish mysteriously disappeared - for decades - until the first one was observed again in 1992 during a federal science based fishery at Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

 

With the re-emergence of the sardines came the humpbacks, around 1995, becoming so numerous in coastal waters off Vancouver Island that they supplanted grey whales as the star attraction of the whale-watching industry.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.