ECOLOGY
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Don´t miss the deadline.

Don´t miss the deadline. | ECOLOGY | Scoop.it
Cristina Álvarez Rodriguez's insight:

 

This post is to remind you that the deadline to submit entries is tomorrow. They should not forget to add a photo of the experiment.

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Power of the Wind | Student Science

Power of the Wind | Student Science | ECOLOGY | Scoop.it
On a breezy day, you can feel the wind in your hair, on your face, against your body. It tickles, pushes, or slams into you, depending on how hard it's blowing. When it's windy, you can fly a kite or go sailing.


The power of the wind can send a kite into the sky—or supply electricity to homes.
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Climate benefit of biofuels from corn residue: Researchers cast doubt

Climate benefit of biofuels from corn residue: Researchers cast doubt | ECOLOGY | Scoop.it
Biofuels made from corn stover -- stalks, leaves and cobs that remain after harvest -- appear to emit more carbon dioxide over their life cycle than federal standards allow, according to new research. The findings cast doubt on whether corn residue can be used to meet federal mandates to ramp up ethanol production and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
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Wily bacteria create ‘zombie’ plants | Student Science

Wily bacteria create ‘zombie’ plants | Student Science | ECOLOGY | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered how some plant pathogens ensure their own survival by transforming flowering plants into strictly leaf-producing ones. These green ‘zombies’ attract insects that the parasites need to help them spread to other plants.
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Moth study suggests hidden climate change impacts

Moth study suggests hidden climate change impacts | ECOLOGY | Scoop.it
A 32-year study of subarctic forest moths in Finnish Lapland suggests that scientists may be underestimating the impacts of climate change on animals and plants because much of the harm is hidden from view. Researchers used advanced statistical techniques to examine the roles of different ecological forces affecting the moth populations and found that warmer temperatures and increased precipitation reduced the rates of population growth.
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