Ecological Science and Engineering
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The physics of life

The physics of life | Ecological Science and Engineering | Scoop.it
From flocking birds to swarming molecules, physicists are seeking to understand 'active matter' — and looking for a fundamental theory of the living world.

 

http://www.nature.com/news/the-physics-of-life-1.19105


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Marcelo Errera's curator insight, January 13, 2016 1:09 PM

Organization emerges naturally. One more manifestation of the constructal law.

 

By the way, soon to appear:

The Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything 
by Adrian Bejan 
Link: http://amzn.com/1250078822

Francisco Restivo's curator insight, January 14, 2016 6:29 PM

Living world is the real laboratory.

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If Half of All Species Go Extinct, Will One of Them Be Us? - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus

If Half of All Species Go Extinct, Will One of Them Be Us? - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus | Ecological Science and Engineering | Scoop.it
Biodiversity JengaMartin SharmanHow many animal species do you think go extinct every year? Last week I conducted a highly unscientific…
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Modeling social-ecological problems in coastal ecosystems: A case study

Modeling social-ecological problems in coastal ecosystems: A case study | Ecological Science and Engineering | Scoop.it

Complex social-ecological systems (SES) are not amenable to simple mathematical modeling. However, to address critical issues in SES (e.g., understanding ecological resilience/amelioration of poverty) it is necessary to describe such systems in their entirety. Based on empirical knowledge of local stakeholders and experts, we mapped their conceptions of one SES. Modelers codified what actors told us into two models: a local-level model and an overarching multiple-entity description of the system. Looking at these two representations together helps us understand links between the locally specific and other levels of decision taking and vice-versa. This “bimodeling” approach is investigated in one SES in coastal Kenya.

 


Modeling social-ecological problems in coastal ecosystems: A case study
John Forrester, Richard Greaves, Howard Noble and Richard Taylor
Complexity

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cplx.21524


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The changing form of Antarctic biodiversity

The changing form of Antarctic biodiversity | Ecological Science and Engineering | Scoop.it

Antarctic biodiversity is much more extensive, ecologically diverse and biogeographically structured than previously thought. Understanding of how this diversity is distributed in marine and terrestrial systems, the mechanisms underlying its spatial variation, and the significance of the microbiota is growing rapidly. Broadly recognizable drivers of diversity variation include energy availability and historical refugia. The impacts of local human activities and global environmental change nonetheless pose challenges to the current and future understanding of Antarctic biodiversity. Life in the Antarctic and the Southern Ocean is surprisingly rich, and as much at risk from environmental change as it is elsewhere.

 

The changing form of Antarctic biodiversity
• Steven L. Chown, Andrew Clarke, Ceridwen I. Fraser, S. Craig Cary, Katherine L. Moon & Melodie A. McGeoch

Nature 522, 431–438 (25 June 2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14505


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The state of the climate — and what we might do about it

The state of the climate — and what we might do about it | Ecological Science and Engineering | Scoop.it
How can we begin to address the global, insidious problem of climate change — a problem that’s too big for any one country to solve? Economist Nicholas Stern lays out a plan, presented to the UN’s Climate Summit in 2014, showing how the world’s countries can work together on climate. It’s a big vision for cooperation, with a payoff that goes far beyond averting disaster. He asks: How can we use this crisis to spur better lives for all?

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Dead stuff: The secret ingredient in our food chain - John C. Moore

Dead stuff: The secret ingredient in our food chain - John C. Moore | Ecological Science and Engineering | Scoop.it
When you picture the lowest levels of the food chain, you might imagine
herbivores happily munching on lush, living green plants. But this
idyllic image leaves out a huge (and slightly less appetizing) source of
nourishment: dead stuff. John C. Moore details the "brown food chain,"
explaining how such unlikely delicacies as pond scum and animal poop
contribute enormous amounts of energy to our ecosystems.

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Eric L Berlow's curator insight, August 31, 2014 12:20 PM

This is the first lesson in our Ecology Series in collaboration with TED Ed . The series focuses on networks in ecology. This one by John Moore explores the wonderful world of detritus. Most of us know that nature 'recycles' dead parts - but this lesson highlights that when you scale this process to the entire ecosystem, dead stuff, and 'brown' food chains, are an unexpectedly huge source of energy that fuels most ecosystems.