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How Mitt Romney Helped Monsanto Take Over the World

How Mitt Romney Helped Monsanto Take Over the World | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
The presidential candidate helped Monsanto transform from teetering, scandal-plagued chemical firm to shiny new ag-biotech giant.
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Music Notation

Music Notation | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

Cymatic exploration of musical notes... I used cymatics as the inspiration and basis to form each square (note). I did this by using an amplifier and putting paper with salt ontop , I played each note on the piano and when the salt vibrated it moved the crystals and in some cases settled and formed patterns. I used some artistic licence when constructing the images and plotted the shapes by studing how the crystals moved. I then converted the formations into the vector images.

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Striking image shows atomic bonds

Striking image shows atomic bonds | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
Researchers in Switzerland show off images of the molecular world so detailed that the type of atomic bonds between their atoms can be discerned.
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Summing Up World Water Week: Making Way For Disruptive Social Innovation

'Summing Up World Water Week: Making Way For Disruptive Social Innovation' blog post by David Wilcox.
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Research Reveals Chimps Can Create Local Social Traditions

Research Reveals Chimps Can Create Local Social Traditions | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

By using five years of observation on neighboring communities of chimpanzees at the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage in Zambia, an international team of scientists has shown that chimpanzees are not only capable of learning from one another, but also use social information to form and maintain local traditions.

 

The specific behavior that the team focused on was the ‘grooming handclasp,’ a behavior where two chimpanzees clasp onto each other’s arms, raise those arms up in the air, and groom each other with their free arm. This behavior has only been observed in some chimpanzee populations. The question remained whether chimpanzees are instinctively inclined to engage in grooming handclasp behavior, or whether they learn this behavior from each other and pass it on to subsequent generations.

 

At Chimfunshi, wild- and captive-born chimpanzees live in woodlands in some of the largest enclosures in the world. The team collaborated with local chimpanzee caretakers in order to collect and comprehend the detailed chimpanzee data. Previous studies suggested that the grooming handclasp might be a cultural phenomenon, just like humans across cultures engage in different ways of greeting each other. However, these suggestions were primarily based on observations that some chimpanzee communities handclasp and others don’t – not whether there are differences between communities that engage in handclasping. Moreover, the early observations could have been explained by differences in genetic and/or ecological factors between the chimpanzee communities, which precluded the interpretation that the chimpanzees were exhibiting ‘cultural’ differences.

 

A new study shows that even between chimpanzee communities that engage in the grooming handclasp, subtle yet stable differences exist in the styles that they prefer: one chimpanzee group highly preferred the style where they would grasp each other’s hands during the grooming, while another group engaged much more in a style where they would fold their wrists around each other’s wrists.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Upcycling's Upshot: How Urban Mushroom Farmers Turned Scavenging into a Business - Business - GOOD

Upcycling's Upshot: How Urban Mushroom Farmers Turned Scavenging into a Business - Business - GOOD | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
“Our whole company is literally built on trash.”...
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Which Is Greener, New Construction or Retrofitting? | Earthtechling

Which Is Greener, New Construction or Retrofitting? | Earthtechling | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
According to a recent report, retrofitting an existing building beats the pants off of new green construction, in terms of eco-benefits, in nearly all cases. (RT @Jmoreels: Which Is Greener, New Construction or Retrofitting?
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The Human Body as Ecosystem: A Way to Revolutionize Medicine

The Human Body as Ecosystem: A Way to Revolutionize Medicine | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

Looking at human beings as ecosystems that contain many collaborating and competing species could change the practice of medicine


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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New “Tree in a Bottle” Changes The Way We View Eco-Packaging - Greener Ideal

New “Tree in a Bottle” Changes The Way We View Eco-Packaging - Greener Ideal | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
With scientists the world stressing the need for society to become more sustainable, the environmentally-safe marketing has exploded.
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Human cells, worms, frogs and plants share mechanism for asymmetrical patterning: tubulin proteins

Human cells, worms, frogs and plants share mechanism for asymmetrical patterning: tubulin proteins | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
As organisms develop, their internal organs arrange in a consistent asymmetrical pattern -- heart and stomach to the left, liver and appendix to the right. But how does this happen?

 

Biologists at Tufts University have produced the first evidence that a class of proteins that make up a cell's skeleton -- tubulin proteins -- drives asymmetrical patterning across a broad spectrum of species, including plants, nematode worms, frogs, and human cells, at their earliest stages of development.

 

Up to now, scientists have identified cilia -- rotating hair-like structures located on the outside of cells -- as having an essential role in determining where internal organs eventually end up. Scientists hypothesized that during later stages of development, cilia direct the flow of embryonic fluid which allows the embryo to distinguish its right side from its left. But it is known that many species develop consistent left-right asymmetry without cilia being present, which suggests that asymmetry can be accomplished in other ways.

 

The researchers pinpointed tubulin proteins, an important component of the cell's skeleton, or cytoskeleton. Tubulin mutations are known to affect the asymmetry of a plant called Arabidopsis, and previous work suggested the possibility that laterality is ultimately triggered by some component of the cytoskeleton. Further, this mechanism could be widely used throughout the tree of life and could function at the earliest stages of embryonic development. Importantly, mutated tubulins perturbed asymmetry only when they were introduced immediately after fertilization, not when they were injected after the first or second cell division. This suggested that a normal cytoskeleton drives asymmetry at extremely early stages of embryogenesis, many hours earlier than the appearance of cilia.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Edible Serenity | Art of Healthy Pleasure

Edible Serenity | Art of Healthy Pleasure | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

Certified Holistic Wellness Practitioner providing body, mind and spiritual transformation. I'm dedicated to improve your Taste for Life!

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Welcome - evolver - Serving the global community of cultural creatives

Welcome - evolver - Serving the global community of cultural creatives | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

Evolver is the leading platform for content, and commerce serving a global community of 80 million cultural creatives seeking optimal states of well being in mind, body, and spirit. We intend to become a leading trust-agent for individuals and groups participating in our transformative culture, one of wisdom, beauty, and fun.

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Big Bang Was Actually a Phase Change, New Theory Says

Big Bang Was Actually a Phase Change, New Theory Says | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
Physicists say the Big Bang was a phase change, like water freezing into ice, rather than an explosion. The theory could have big implications.
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The Power Of Biomimicry

The Power Of Biomimicry | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
From Mother Nature Network's John Platt: A wind turbine designed to incorporate the bumps on a whale's tale.
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Is mass education the solution to Future Education?

Is mass education the solution to Future Education? | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
What are some of the issues of mass education, based on video lectures or lectures in Future Education? In this who-would-choose-a-lecture-as-their-primary-mode-of-learning? by Jackie Gerstein, Ed....
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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North America's First Vertical Urban Farm is Being Built in Canada - Techvibes.com

North America's First Vertical Urban Farm is Being Built in Canada - Techvibes.com | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
Vancouver-based Alterrus Systems will begin building North America’s first VertiCrop urban farming system on the top level of a downtown Vancouver...
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Ecohyphen #10 Evo-Hyphen with Jeremy Johnson and Miri Gabriel.

Ecohyphen #10 Evo-Hyphen with Jeremy Johnson and Miri Gabriel. | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

This week our guest hosts Jeremy Johnson and Miri Gabriel talk with team Ecohyphen about intentional communities, online and in the “real world” as a force for social change. Jeremy and Miri are active in the Evolver Social Network and we discuss how online communities can function to transform society towards a more sustainable society. Make sure to listen to the end, as this episode has a startling conclusion!!

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Study: There is enough wind on this planet to meet our entire energy needs

Study: There is enough wind on this planet to meet our entire energy needs | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
A recent study from the Carnegie Institution for Science is suggesting that planetary winds pack enough power to energize our entire civilization —...
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Fracking, shale gas and health effects: Research roundup – Journalist's Resource: Research for Reporting, from Harvard Shorenstein Center

Fracking, shale gas and health effects: Research roundup – Journalist's Resource: Research for Reporting, from Harvard Shorenstein Center | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
2012 review of scientific literature on potential health effects of hydraulic fracturing, or...
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Dancing to Eagle Spirit Society - TWO SPIRITED PEOPLE

Dancing to Eagle Spirit Society - TWO SPIRITED PEOPLE | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
We are dedicated to the healing and empowerment of aboriginal and non-aboriginal two-spirit individuals and allies...
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Yoga: How We Serve Women in Prison

This is an interview with Elizabeth Johnstone, who in 2007 started teaching yoga and meditation at York Correctional Institution in Niantic, Conn.
Via Wendy Jason
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Hanaé Luong's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:04 AM

Interview de Mrs Jonhstone, prof de Yoga dans une prison pour femmes à York

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Stanford biologist and computer scientist discover the 'anternet' | School of Engineering

Stanford biologist and computer scientist discover the 'anternet' | School of Engineering | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it

The hivemind works like the hivemind: Scientists at Stanford fsmith at ants use similar networking system as the Internet does.

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Neil Armstrong, First Man on the Moon, Is Dead at 82

Neil Armstrong, First Man on the Moon, Is Dead at 82 | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
A former Navy fighter pilot who made history in 1969 with “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”...
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Remarkable video captures the flow of proteins inside an individual neuron

Remarkable video captures the flow of proteins inside an individual neuron | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
This is absolutely incredible. Molecular biologists at USC have captured video footage of a neuron so finely detailed, you can actually observe the transport of individual proteins throughout the cell's structure, offering them an unprecedented...
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Amazing Macro Photographs of Insects Covered in Dew

Amazing Macro Photographs of Insects Covered in Dew | Ecohyphen | Scoop.it
Creepy crawlies you'd usually steer clear of become jewel-like just after the rain.
Via Sakis Koukouvis, Andy NCode
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