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EMC:Innovation comes from somebody that’s using one of our products every day who says, “Have you ever thought of this?

EMC:Innovation comes from somebody that’s using one of our products every day who says, “Have you ever thought of this? | line of sight | Scoop.it

Joe Tucci became CEO of the EMC Corporation, a leading storage and information technology firm, in January 2001. It was, as he says, an interesting time.

The Internet bubble had just burst — EMC’s market cap plunged and its revenue slipped along with it — 9/11 was about to happen, and the United States, EMC’s biggest market, would soon slip into a recession that affected the tech sector disproportionately. Difficult as these challenges were, they were in many ways less challenging than the problems that Tucci faced when he became CEO of the bankrupt Wang Laboratories and was tasked with fixing that company. In both cases, he succeeded well beyond expectations.

The secret to bringing battered companies back to life is not really a secret. It involves devising a plan, getting everyone on board with it and sticking to that plan with a strong sense of discipline. But a leader must do more. A leader must also generate a sense of hope. At EMC, one of the ways Tucci did this was by reminding people that the firm was the leader in storage technology — a great and growing business — and by refusing to cut core research and development spending. While critics said R&D should not be considered sacred, the signal Tucci sent to the company was that EMC was not retrenching; it was committed to building its future.

Tucci, who prides himself on his accessibility as CEO — chairman was added to his title in 2006 — achieved phenomenal results. Revenue at EMC grew to $20 billion, and the company’s market capitalization increased around sixfold from its low. Since joining EMC, he has made around 70 large and small acquisitions. One of these, VMware, which is public, is valued at around $46 billion, with EMC retaining an 80 percent stake.

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iPads shake up traditional company meetings | simply communicate

iPads shake up traditional company meetings | simply communicate | line of sight | Scoop.it

With 100 million readers, Reader’s Digest is the largest magazine in the world with a rich, 90-year history. However, in order to keep up with the changing times, it’s important for the company to adapt to new technologies to engage meeting attendees and build the internal brand.

Susan Fraysse Russ, Vice President of Global Communications at Reader’s Digest, had a brainstorm: what if the company moved their global leaders meeting materials onto the iPad to create a completely different delegate experience? She recalls:

“As a company, we sort of lost our way in that we were always the biggest and the best. As times changed, we didn’t change as quickly. So we were trying to get all our employees focused on new technology and think about the best ways to do that. With 66 million iPads expected to be sold in 35 countries by the end of this year, these tablets aren’t going away. The technology will continue to grow and grow.”

To Russ’ surprise, buy-in for iPad use at the meeting was a breeze.

“The second senior leaders heard about it, people jumped on board to support it, even offering money from their budget to upgrade to 3G. I had people throwing money at me to try to do a better job. I’m proud to say we didn’t need to do that. We were really able to keep it within the same budget,” she recalls.

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Vital allies: CFOs and tech chiefs form a bond to scope out customer needs

Vital allies: CFOs and tech chiefs form a bond to scope out customer needs | line of sight | Scoop.it
For George Westerman, a professor at MIT Sloan School of Management and coauthor of The Real Business of IT: How CIOs Create and Communicate Value, what's really turning CFOs and technology chiefs into corporate partners is the drive for transparency, something that IT is enabling now as never before. "What we've found in our research is that the number one way to improve operations is to create transparency about performance," he says. More than any other executives, "CFOs understand transparency and the discipline that can grow from it."

At companies that are relying more heavily on cloud-based services, the strong alliance between the CFO and top tech officials, whatever their titles, has become particularly vital to corporate success. Nearly always, for example, the heads of the two departments are finding they need work in concert on issues related to the company's enterprise resource planning system, along with other IT systems.

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The Future of IT Looks More Like Human Resources and Facilities

The Future of IT Looks More Like Human Resources and Facilities | line of sight | Scoop.it

Advice to CIO’s
Continue to develop your business acumen and find ways to contribute to the business strategically as a broker-facilitator.
Plan for your obsolescence as it will demonstrate more strategic business sense than most any other thing you could do and may even secure your future within your organization.
Get ahead of your CEO and find the courage to pursue these ideas proactively.

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Innovation: The 7 Key Differences Between Big and Small Companies | 15inno

Innovation: The 7 Key Differences Between Big and Small Companies | 15inno | line of sight | Scoop.it
Anyone who has worked for both a large corporation and a small, entrepreneurial company can talk endlessly about the differences in the two cultures and mindsets.

In this post, I look into these differences and the challenges they cause. It is a long post based on my latest book, Making Open Innovation Work. You can download it for free at this link : – )

The 7 key differences between big and small companies when it comes to innovation are:

• Speed of decision-making
• Attitude toward risk
• Allocation of resources
• Who understands the business model and who manages it:
• Processes or lack thereof
• Following rules versus breaking rules
• Differering definitions of innovation

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The Things Customers Can Do Better Than You

The Things Customers Can Do Better Than You | line of sight | Scoop.it
Many firms assume that customers can do just one thing of real significance: buy their products and services. It's time to seriously challenge that assumption, as many companies are doing by looking to customers to fuel their growth engines.
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CxO Lessons

CxO Lessons provides a world-class resource for providers and users of outsourcing services with Executive Insights, white papers and case studies available online and across multiple portable devices and more.
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How to Fix Your Website’s Navigation (it’s really easy)

How to Fix Your Website’s Navigation (it’s really easy) | line of sight | Scoop.it

When you know how people consume your content, you can improve your conversions and usability, meaning people will love you and your site. 

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We Need More Demos — CIO Dashboard

We Need More Demos — CIO Dashboard | line of sight | Scoop.it
When was the last time you showed anyone a demo or prototype of something totally new? Do you have a simple and publicized way to let people experiment or get an idea on the table (I’m not talking about some giant top-down corporate idea sharing initiative either)? A large part of managing expectations around demos and experiments is just setting and sharing the ground rules – how much money, how much time, what the end result will or wont do.

The amount of sheer joy, amazement and inspiration that comes from watching a demo of a great idea is worth its weight in gold.

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IT spending outside IT department control is heading towards parity | The Governance Board

IT spending outside IT department control is heading towards parity | The Governance Board | line of sight | Scoop.it

Recent excitement around cloud computing has drawn more attention to IT spending by business units. However, this is not a new phenomenon. Since the beginning of our research we saw business units maintain ownership of their control systems, monitors and work-flow specific processing services. Nevertheless, the impact of software-as-a-service is clear. There has been a significant uptick in IT spending outside the IT department and most often cited examples are niche software services to replace tasks that used to be driven manually, through spreadsheets or simply overlooked. Almost all these engagements were with the blessing of the CIO’s team, who appear to be relieved that non-core applications no longer distract the central IT team.

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Use This “Ethics Check” to Ensure You Make Ethical Decisions

Use This “Ethics Check” to Ensure You Make Ethical Decisions | line of sight | Scoop.it

Unethical leaders always seem to be in the news these days, which raises the question:  How can you be sure you are leading in an ethical way?


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The Art of Showing Up | Matt Martin

The Art of Showing Up | Matt Martin | line of sight | Scoop.it

Recently, I’ve been asked by several people how I’ve improved so much as a runner. I’ve gotten faster and stronger over the last 2 years and recently had my first top 10 finish in a large local 10K. I was thinking about this question and my answer, and I’ve reached a conclusion that applies to many other areas of my life where I have seen success: I showed up.
Over and over, I showed up for track runs, group runs, long runs, consistently did weight workouts, plyometrics and stretched. Rain, ice, snow or high winds, I showed up. See proof here where a local tv crew caught me running 8 miles in the snow and ice this past February:

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The essence of business complexity expressed in pictures

The essence of business complexity expressed in pictures | line of sight | Scoop.it
This is the MOST accurate, intelligent, comprehensive explanation of why big companies manage to mess up great ideas time and time again. Pure genius.
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11 reasons your infographic isn't an infographic

11 reasons your infographic isn't an infographic | line of sight | Scoop.it
OK everyone. Take a deep, freaking breath. I can't sneeze right now without spraying germs on someone's attempt at a data-driven work of art. Here's why the poster you paid someone $400 to make isn't an infographic: Lack of clarity.
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The return of the CIO | Technology Spectator

Once viewed as the trendy, new kid on the block with unlimited potential, the role of the CIO has become stagnant over the past few years. As the cost of IT continues to rise and the connection between IT maintenance and revenue streams grow more divergent, CIOs are finding that their voice in the boardroom is losing its impact, effectively marginalising the position. As a result, running IT operations is hardly a stepping stone to the CEO’s chair at the head of the table.

According to CIO Magazine (2011), only 10 per cent of CIOs at Fortune 500 companies rise to the next level, the CIO is the least appreciated of the CXO roles and that a massive 23 per cent are eventually fired.

The way to win over perception is to attach yourself to revenue-generating projects, relying on real and measurable data that shows obvious operational benefits to the organisation. Look at web impressions for the new e-commerce site or improving time-to-market timelines to show how IT drives operational efficiencies. The problem is that many of these projects are still run through discrete business units such as a web group, product group or digital group under the marketing or operations departments - rather than under your purview in the IT department.

This lack of ownership over revenue-generating initiatives forces many IT organisations to focus most of their time and resources on operations - the effort to maintain current availability and status.

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Air Force chief of staff releases 2012 reading List

Air Force chief of staff releases 2012 reading List | line of sight | Scoop.it
The Air Force chief of staff announced his latest professional reading list Jan. 6.

In a letter to all Air Force personnel, Gen. Norton Schwartz said today's Airmen are among the military's best educated and most inquisitive.
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Research review: How our shopping habits are changing the retail landscape | The Governance Board

Research review: How our shopping habits are changing the retail landscape | The Governance Board | line of sight | Scoop.it

No one would argue that the retail landscape is not changing. Retailing is now ‘well-and-truly’ a multi channel business. It’s no longer simply about the local store or the broad catalogue. Retailing is a changing industry where the dominant agent of change is not the retailer but us – the customer.

In “Customers take control” published by PwC in December 2011, survey data and rich insights are presented which make the irrefutable case that it is the consumer that is leading and shaping the global retail industry. Specifically it is our online consumer behaviour. The report, authored by Mark Hudson and John Maxwell, respectively UK and Global Retail and Consumer Leaders for PwC, presents the findings from over 7,000 online surveys (where the survey respondents’ profile reflected the age, gender, employment status and regional profile of 8 selected national markets across 3 continents). The results from this survey point to several implications for retailers both at a national level and a global one.

Our ten-point summary of the report:

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Machiavelli 2.0 | Harvard International Review

Machiavelli 2.0 | Harvard International Review | line of sight | Scoop.it

With the phenomenon of “web 2.0,” defined by Clay Shirky as ridiculously simple group forming, this trend towards network society has accelerated. The transformative potential of web 2.0 technologies and their accompanying societal practices is derived from four factors: First, they expand the social universe by making cooperation possible in situations where the transaction costs would have been prohibitively high. Wikipedia, Facebook and MySpace are good examples of such services. Second, web technologies compete with existing forms of providing public value. Peer-to-Peer-Music-Sharing platforms are examples, but also new discovery platforms such as Amiestreet or Jamando. Third, they disrupt the balance of power between existing social actors, for example by empowering NGO’s by allowing them to distribute massive amounts of data to the community as the Groklaw example has shown, or by moving power from large to small donors in U.S. Presidential elections. And lastly, they corrode how we do things in existing organisations by giving us new tools that undermine internal information flows and hierarchies.
Because of this four-way assault on our existing societal institutions, even as good followers of Machiavelli, we have to expect dramatic shifts in how we do things in collectivities from the local to the global level. Many societal communities are already functioning according to such principles, most notably in open source development, global terrorism, political campaigning, or the alter-globalization movement. Networked forms of societies are becoming serious alternatives to modern societies and we need to better understand them if we want to succeed in todays complex policy environments. So in 2010, Machiavelli would advise the prince to build her power base around open networked communities, transparency, standardized interfaces and a bold move to just sail unchartered waters to test their boundaries.

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Is your business ready for customers’ converged lifestyles? | The Governance Board

Is your business ready for customers’ converged lifestyles? | The Governance Board | line of sight | Scoop.it

Willingness to pay: Across all sectors, customers are looking for ways to reduce the cost of their technology without jeopardizing quality. From television service providers to mobile operators and ISPs, businesses will need to rethink their revenue models and price points. Much of the internal tension we saw in 2011 can be traced back to business model changes driven by changing willingness to pay.

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Center for CIO Leadership: Blogs: The consumerization of IT and the CIO role

Center for CIO Leadership: Blogs: The consumerization of IT and the CIO role | line of sight | Scoop.it

Those who question whether the CIO role will continue to exist are asking the wrong question. The question is not whether there will be CIOs by 2013. Instead, the question is, what role will CIOs at top-performing companies play this year, the next and the next?

This story by Harvey Koeppel which was published on Search CIO and those that will follow will be devoted to describing the drivers of the dramatic changes we are seeing from the perspective of both technology and the business. My goal is to help clarify and even anticipate what these drivers mean to CIOs and, most importantly, what leaders should focus on to ensure their investments are returning maximum value and increasing their competitive advantage.

From work we have done at the Center for CIO Leadership, it's clear we are living in unprecedented times. Some people talk about the migration of technology from the back office (accounting, process management and ERP, for example) to the front office (for instance, analytics, marketing, sales and customer relationship management). Yes, that migration is partly about how companies are deploying newer and more sophisticated technologies throughout the organization, but it's also about how people -- not just companies -- are acquiring and using newer and more sophisticated technologies in innovative ways.

An interesting place to start is with what many describe as the consumerization of IT, which has been driven largely by the ubiquitous use of the Internet and mobile and broadband technologies.

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We have over 250000 apps in the App Store. We don’t need any more Fart apps.

We have over 250000 apps in the App Store. We don’t need any more Fart apps. | line of sight | Scoop.it

LUCY KELLAWAY: Low language and high profits meet
Apple’s continued glory eats away at me. I long for it to pick up some bruises. When the iPad came out, I prayed it would be awful.LIKE most Brits, I find success in others pretty hard to cope with. When that success is combined with good looks, I can’t tolerate it at all.

Apple’s continued glory eats away at me. I long for it to pick up some bruises. When the iPad came out, I prayed it would be awful. My prayers were not heard: like all Apple products, it is sleek and gorgeous, and in due course I shall go to one of its temples of consumption and grumpily buy one.

Now I find that the company has succeeded in an area even more revolutionary than designing beautiful products that are easy to use. This time, though, I feel no discomfort. Apple has discovered something that other companies have long forgotten, if they ever knew: language can also be beautiful and easy to use. Words can be fun . They can look elegant. They can make you laugh.

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Governance of enterprise security still a low priority for the board: Report

Boards and senior management still are not exercising appropriate governance over the privacy and security of their digital assets.
This stark conclusion comes from the Carnegie Mellon CyLab 2012 report. Professor Jody R. Westby released the advanced key findings of the report at the RSA Conference 2012 on Tuesday (27 February) in San Francisco.
"Even though there are some improvements in key "regular" board governance practices, less than one third of the respondents are undertaking basic responsibilities for cyber governance," she said, citing the report.
Sponsored by RSA and using the Forbes Global 2000 list, the 2012 survey represents the first analysis of cyber governance postures of major corporations around the world. The survey participants were CEOs/presidents (52 percent), corporate secretaries (15 percent) and Board Chairs (24 percent).
The survey also found that there is still an apparent disconnect between boards and senior executives understanding that privacy and security and IT risks are part of enterprise risk management.
"This conclusion is bolstered by the lack of attention by boards to cyber insurance coverage," the report said.

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Breaking Free of the One-Page Dashboard Rule – Juice Analytics

Breaking Free of the One-Page Dashboard Rule – Juice Analytics | line of sight | Scoop.it

The argument that a one-page dashboard necessarily provides an view of your business “at a glance” is more self-deceiving. Well-known information-ista Stephen Few uses this rationale in his definition of a dashboard:
A visual display of the most important information needed to achieve one or more objectives; consolidated and arranged on a single screen so the information can be monitored at a glance. PDF
I check my speedometer “at a glance”. I “glance” at a Heads-up Display (HUD) on a video game showing how much energy my character has remaining. These displays communicate but a single number that is already hovering on the corner of my consciousness. 

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Five New Management Metrics You Need To Know - Forbes

Five New Management Metrics You Need To Know - Forbes | line of sight | Scoop.it
After years of leading teams and watching some of the best startup CEOs in the world, I’ve learned that the most important metrics are often ones you never read about on the income statement or in the financial press.
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Steve's Seven Insights for 21st Century Capitalists

Steve's Seven Insights for 21st Century Capitalists | line of sight | Scoop.it
Herewith, without further ado, a minor eulogy for Steve Jobs the CEO.


Don't pander — better. "We didn't build the Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves." It's the received wisdom that Steve never listened to his customers — and he'd often make a point of saying so. But how many other CEOs do you know that were listening so intently that they responded to the average fanboy's (or troll's) emails? Steve's goal in paying obsessive attention to all things Apple wasn't merely to "listen" but to discern people's wildest expectations, and then firmly take a quantum leap past them, instead of merely discovering the lowest-common-denominator of what people wanted most today, and then pandering to it. Leapfrogging your customers means creating new markets, not just new products. And Apple's created (or rejuvenated) market after market by applying the logic above.

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