Eclectic Random Flotsam
776 views | +0 today
Follow
Eclectic Random Flotsam
jump in the mud - feel it squish between your toes!
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

The Surprising Data Behind Shale Oil

The Surprising Data Behind Shale Oil | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
Hooray, oil is suddenly much cheaper than it used to be. That's great news, right? Not so fast.
Michelle Weiner's insight:

Not only are prices lower (too low to make fracking and other unconventional well stimulation techniques profitable), but the amount of oil available in the touted shale plays is dropping rapidly (1/5 of the wells drilled into the Barnett peaked in 2011 and are no longer productive), says oil industry analyst, David Hughes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Missing in Action from the Latest GMO Labeling Battle: The Organic and ‘Natural’ Elite

Missing in Action from the Latest GMO Labeling Battle: The Organic and ‘Natural’ Elite
For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Genetic Engineering page and our Millions Against Monsanto page.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Proposed Moratorium on Fracking in Culver City makes front page of LA Times today

Meghan Sahli-Wells, a member of Culver City's committee on oil and gas issues speaks about the proposed moratorium on fracking in CC's oil/gas ordinance.

Michelle Weiner's insight:

In New Mexico, County leads the charge against fracking   BY JULIE CART

   

OCATE, N.M. — Sitting in the tidy living room of the home they built themselves, Sandra and Roger Alcon inventory what they see as the bounty of their lives: freedom, family, community, land, animals … and water.

 

   “We’ve lived off the land for five generations,” said Roger Alcon, 63, looking out on a northern New Mexico landscape of high mesas, ponderosa pines and black Angus cattle. “We have what we need. We’ve been very happy, living in peace.”

 

   Wells are the Alcons’ only source of water. The same is true for everyone else in Mora County, which is why last month this poor, conservative ranching region of energy-rich New Mexico became the first county in the nation to pass an ordinance banning hydraulic fracturing, the controversial oil and gas extraction technique known as “fracking” that has compromised water quantity and quality in communities around the country.

 

   “I don’t want to destroy our water,” Alcon said. “You can’t drink oil.”

 

   In embracing the ban, landowners turned their back on potentially lucrative royalty payments from drilling on their property and joined in a groundswell of civic opposition to fracking that is rolling west from Ohio, New York and Pennsylvania in the gas-rich Marcellus shale formation.

 

   Pittsburgh became the first U.S. city to outlaw fracking in November 2010 after it came to light that an energy company held a lease to drill under a beloved city cemetery.

 

   Since then, more than a dozen cities in the East have passed similar ordinances.

 

   The movement leapfrogged west last summer when the town of Las Vegas, N.M., took up the cause, calling for a halt to fracking until adequate regulations protecting public health are adopted.

 

   It has now reached California, where communities are considering similar bans.

 

   Culver City — home to the nation’s largest urban oil field — is drafting oil and gas regulations that call for a moratorium on fracking. Citizen groups in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara are preparing their own community rights ballot measures aimed at outlawing the procedure.

 

   Hydraulic fracturing involves injecting a high-pressure mix of water, sand and chemicals deep underground to fracture rock formations, releasing oil and gas that is hard to reach with conventional drilling methods. A blizzard of applications to sink wells using fracking is spurring a nationwide energy rush sometimes called the “shale gale.”

 

   Among the leading concerns of opponents is the absence of any federal law requiring companies to fully identify the chemicals in their fracking fluids. Such formulas are considered by the industry to be a trade secret. Community-based anti-fracking campaigns — citing public health issues — call for complete disclosure of injection fluids.

 

   Many New Mexico counties welcome oil and gas production, an industry that adds to the tax base and employment rolls. But in sparsely populated Mora County, where 67% of the 5,000 residents are Spanish-speaking, people cherish their culture and way of life.

 

   Sandra Alcon said her neighbors don’t care about mineral rights or oil money. They are angry about the way energy companies’ “land men” treated them. Residents here are seen as easy marks for hustlers offering little compensation for oil and water rights, she said.

 

   “They know we have a lot of elderly and rural people; some don’t speak English,” she said. “They don’t know that some of us went to college and some of us have the Internet.

 

   “I may look stupid, but I’m not. I know what they are doing.”

 

   Mora County, using its authority to regulate commercial activity, specifically barred corporations from fracking. The ordinance also established that citizens have a right to a safe and clean environment.

 

   County Commission Chairman John Olivas said the ordinance is not a referendum on oil and gas. Rather, he said, it “is all about water,” estimating that 95% of the county’s residents support the ban, although some argue that the jobs and income that accompany drilling would help the depressed area.

 

   Olivas, a hunting and fishing guide, said he grew up watching his parents work in the uranium mines of eastern New Mexico. When the mines played out, towns shriveled up.

 

   Chasing that boom-and-bust economy is not worth despoiling an environment that remains remarkably untouched and provides a sustainable living for most people here, he said.

 

   “We are one of the poorest counties in the nation, yes, but we are money-poor, we are not asset-poor,” Olivas said. “We’ve got land, we’ve got agriculture, we’ve got our heritage and we’ve got our culture.”

 

   The California community closest to adopting an anti-fracking ordinance is Culver City, which includes a portion of the 1,000-acre Inglewood Oil Field. More than 1 million people live within five miles of the field, where some 1,600 wells have been drilled since1925.

 

   The City Council is considering a moratorium, even though only10% of the field is within the city limits. The bulk of the wells are in unincorporated Los Angeles County.

 

   City officials and residents say they are concerned about air and water quality, as well as about earthquakes being triggered by drilling at 8,000 to 10,000 feet — the depths where the untapped oil is found.

 

   Low-magnitude earthquakes have been associated with fracking, but Ed Me-mi, a spokesman for PXP, which operates in the Inglewood Field, called suggestions that high-pressure drilling causes earthquakes “hysterical accusations.”

 

   “There is no evidence that hydraulic fracturing has caused felt seismic activity anywhere in California,” Memi said. “The practice of hydraulic fracturing has been subjected to dozens of studies in recent years, and the fundamental safety of the technology is well understood by scientists , engineers, regulators and other technical experts.”

 

   But Meghan Sahli-Wells, Culver City’s vice mayor, said the city needs to see more study of fracking’s impact before it could be allowed.

 

   “I grew up in L.A. All my life I’ve heard about air-quality problems, earthquakes and water issues,” Sahli-Wells said. “It just so happens that fracking really hits on the three major challenges of this area. Frankly, I’ve been waiting for people to wake up and say, ‘We are fracking on a fault line? Is this really in our interests?’”

 

   If Culver City moves forward with a moratorium, it could take months to complete, she said.

 

   Fracking is unregulated in California, and no accurate figures exist detailing how many of the state’s wells are completed using the technique.

 

   A number of anti-fracking bills are pending before the state Assembly, and statewide regulations are being finalized by the state Department of Conservation.

 

   Sahli-Wells endorses legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Holly Mitchell (D-Culver City) that calls for a moratorium on fracking in California until a comprehensive six-year study can be undertaken.

 

   “Look before you leap” legislation is pending in other states.

 

   On a recent day back in Mora County, Roger Alcon drove his ranch with his herding dog, Pepper, at his side. He said the region’s aquifer has been depleted by oil and gas operations in the region. He sees no reason to hasten the water decline.

 

   Alcon pointed out the truck window toward the snowcapped Sangre de Cris-to mountains.

 

   “We have what we need,” he said. “To me, the fresh air and the land, and water. It’s better than money.”julie.cart@latimes.com 

JULIE CART Los Angeles Times

 

 

   ROGER ALCON, 63, tends to cattle on his family’s ranch in Mora County, N.M. “I don’t want to destroy our water,” Alcon said. “You can’t drink oil.”

 

Los Angeles Times

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

EPA website free handbook - Landscaping with native plants

Michelle Weiner's insight:

The Environmental Protection Agency website posts this excellent free resource -  a handbook for GrassUpRoots Campaigns and for anyone who wants to rid themselves of water-wasting lawns. Do you want to know about landscaping with native plants?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

A Celebration of Life: Remembering Manzanar Committee, San Fernando Valley JACL, LGBT Leader Tak Yamamoto

A Celebration of Life: Remembering Manzanar Committee, San Fernando Valley JACL, LGBT Leader Tak Yamamoto | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES — A Celebration of Life honoring long-time Manzanar Committee, San Fernando Japanese American Citizens League (SFV JACL), and LGBT community leader Takenori “Tak” Yama...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

California's water supply must be protected from fracking

California's proposed fracking regulations do little to protect our precious water resources.

 

Michelle Weiner's insight:

Editorial: California's water supply must be protected from fracking Daily News Posted:   01/01/2013 05:31:59 PM PSTUpdated:   01/01/2013 07:41:48 PM PST

 

  

THE great fracking debate is coming to California, pitting the oil and natural gas industry against environmentalists in a battle for control of the Monterey Shale, which extends from the Central Valley down to Los Angeles County. It is believed to be the richest oil deposit in the United States.

Energy companies dream of setting off a 21st-century Gold Rush, bringing jobs and riches to a region now suffering from high unemployment. California has a golden opportunity to help meet the nation's energy needs while enacting model legislation for other states to follow. But the experiences of Pennsylvania, New York and Texas provide a wealth of knowledge about fracking's considerable risks to groundwater and air quality and we have to learn from them.

Gov. Jerry Brown has gotten off to a terrible start. The draft rules he has released are ridiculously inadequate. They fail the primary test, which is to protect the integrity of the state's water supply - a resource more precious than oil in California.

Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing, a drilling method that injects chemicals under high pressure into the ground to free oil and gas from rock formations. The drillers prefer not to disclose the chemicals they use, arguing that their formulas are trade secrets. But secrecy also shields them from responsibility for damage the chemicals might do to water supplies. Brown's draft rules allow that absurdity.

At least eight states, including Colorado, Pennsylvania and Texas - all considered to be more pro-business than California - have already enacted disclosure legislation, in some cases after hard lessons. The wastewater from fracking in Pennsylvania made the Monongahela River, which supplies drinking water for tens of thousands of residents, unfit for use for months.

Fortunately, some legislators, including Fremont Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski and Santa Monica Sen. Fran Pavley, are arguing for the public's right to know what's being pumped into the ground. They believe water quality tests should be done - and the results be made public - before and after any fracking occurs. And they want more advance notice of fracking operations. These are common sense requirements.

It isn't only drinking water at stake. The Monterey Shale oil deposits lie 11,000 feet below some of California's richest agricultural land, stretching roughly from Modesto to Bakersfield. California provides more than 10 percent of the nation's food, and much of it is produced in the Central Valley.

Energy producers have known about the Monterey Shale since 1969, but only in the last decade has new technology made it profitable to go after the 15.4 billion barrels of oil. Hence the need for new regulations.

The Monterey Shale could produce enough oil to meet the entire nation's energy needs for about three years. There are many benefits to be gleaned and fortunes to be made, but this oil is not our permanent energy salvation, and reaching it is not more important than protecting California's water. That should be the governor's main concern.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

The City of Culver City is pleased to invite your participation in a discussion of: ALLOCATION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUNDS FOR 2013-14


WHO: The Community Development Block Grant Advisory Committee (CDBGAC).
WHAT: The CDBGAC will receive public input and formulate recommendations to the City Council regarding the allocation of the City’s 2013-2014 CDBG funding (estimated at $212,738).
WHERE: Dan Patacchia Conference Room in City Hall, First Floor
9770 Culver Boulevard, Culver City, CA 90232
WHEN: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 6:30 PM
WHY: CDBG funds are used to improve and conserve urban communities. Community involvement as to how CDBG funds will be allocated is a goal of the Federal CDBG guidelines and is consistent with Culver City’s participatory government. Examples of eligible projects include development of needed public infrastructure and community facilities, and assistance to the elderly and/or persons with disabilities including compliance with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
An informational report to the CDBGAC on this subject will be available no later than Tuesday, December 4, 2012 at City Hall, Planning Division (second floor), 9770 Culver Boulevard; the Culver City Senior Center, 4095 Overland Avenue; and at the Culver City Branch Library, 4975 Overland Avenue.
The CDBGAC welcomes comments from the public. Comments should be sent to Ms. Kriss Casanova, CDBG Administrator, by December 10, 2012. Written comments should be mailed to Ms. Casanova at 9770 Culver Boulevard, Culver City, CA 90232 or emailed to kriss.casanova@culvercity.org. Additional information can be obtained by calling Ms. Casanova at (310) 253-5769.
The CDBGAC’s recommendations will be presented to the City Council for consideration on January 14, 2013.
ALLOCATION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUNDS
FOR 2013-14
City of Culver City
Official Courtesy Notification

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Susan Rice's Conflict of Interest - Major Holdings in Tar Sands Oil, Keystone XL Pipeline, and Canadian Financiers

Susan Rice's Conflict of Interest - Major Holdings in Tar Sands Oil, Keystone XL Pipeline, and Canadian Financiers | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michelle Weiner from Free to Leave
Scoop.it!

How to Survive Societal Collapse in Suburbia

How to Survive Societal Collapse in Suburbia | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
Preparing for a world stripped of conveniences has always appealed to cranks and extremists. But can it be sold as plain common sense?

Via Free to Leave
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

World-Class Tunnel Built For Bicyclists and Pedestrians

World-Class Tunnel Built For Bicyclists and Pedestrians | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
The Marin County Bicycle Coalition won a major victory with the opening of the Cal Park Hill Tunnel — a world class facility that makes biking the quickest commuting option.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Evelyn Close to Gaining Legal Status - A Request

http://www.youcaring.com/fundraiser_details?url=evelynsimmigrationjourney&fundraiser_id=10204

 

Evelyn's immigration journey
Organizer : Traci Sommers
This Fundraiser ends on : November 5, 2012
Beneficiary : Evelyn Arenales

HomeUpdates ( 1 )Supporters (23)Comments (0)
There are 2 days left and we are only $685.00 away from our goal! This Monday is Evelyn's birthday and the best gift of all would be to begin her new life as a legal resident in the U.S.! She can't wait to do all the things we take for granted such as being able to vote and have a job. A heartfelt thank you to everyone who has donated already! Remember, there is no donation too small - every dollar puts us closer to our goal! If you wouldn't mind, please forward this email to your friends or repost this on Facebook so more people can help if they wish. You may donate using Paypal or by sending a check to my home or to Traci Sommers. P.O. Box 3366, Chatsworth, CA 91313.
.
Hi my name is Traci and I have known Evelyn for 18 years. She was my student at the Special Education school where I taught. Evelyn was a fun loving, energetic teen. She participated in drama, sports and other school activities. As a young adult she loves music, dancing, and doing things with her family and friends. She loves John Travolta (in Grease) and pop singer Justin Bieber.
Since graduating high school she has gained many worthwhile job skills through her day program for disabled adults. She has always wanted to have a real job where she could use these skills and earn money.
The only thing standing in her way is her lack of a green card which would enable her to be here legally and to get a job.
Evelyn was brought here illegally from Guatemala when she was only 4 years old. It would have been easier to get Evelyn legal status in the U.S. as a young child but it was never done.
In early 2001 I helped Evelyn apply for her green card through an amnesty program which allowed her to apply without going back to Guatemala. After September 11 of that year (911), her paperwork became embroiled in the restructuring of the Immigration Department.
And now, eleven years later, she has finally received her approval letter! The big glitch now is that it will cost her $2,565.00 to become a resident. There use to be a section in the application which would grant handicapped individuals a fee waiver. In the updated application there is no mention of help for the disabled.
We have submitted her request for a fee waiver 3 times, each time adding more documentation about her disability and 3 times it was rejected.
This is where we need your help. A donation from you would help Evelyn achieve her dreams: To have a home in this country legally, to be able to have a job and to eventually become a citizen. Any amount you could donate will help Evelyn come closer to attaining her goals.
Raised: $1880.00
Target: $2565.00
2 days left

Pass It On
Do you know someone who could use some help raising funds for adoptions, medical expenses, missions or tuition? You can let them know about YouCaring with the button below.

Need to report this fundraiser?

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Family Fridays Spotlight: Meet Ellyn And Lorraine's Family

Family Fridays Spotlight: Meet Ellyn And Lorraine's Family | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
As part of our Family Friday series, every week we spotlight one family, share the story of their love and send lots of love and support to them from our own huge family all over the world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Culver City Joins Dozens of Other Cities Calling for National Action on Climate Change

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Foreign Investment in Mexican Oil

Proposed changes could help revive Mexico’s energy sector and give its economy a much-needed lift.
Michelle Weiner's insight:

American oil compaines are jonesing to turn Mexico into an oil-banana republlic. If they can't pollute and create climate havoc here, why not prey on Mexico?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Self-reliance in LA: backyard farming + radical home ec

Self-reliance in LA: backyard farming + radical home ec | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
*faircompanies is a free resource to help you act responsibly, an independent website with information and tools on sustainability.
Michelle Weiner's insight:

Are you curious about the set-up over at the Knutzen-Coyne house (Root Simple  folks)?  This delightful video tells the story.  Enjoy!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Forum at LMU: Moving from Fear to Action

Climate Change Forum at LMU:  Moving from Fear to Action | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
Michelle Weiner's insight:

Action-oriented forum!  In biking distance...or carpool?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Report

Report | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
Michelle Weiner's insight:

No there there!  Hydraulic fracturing delays the inevitable by 5-10 years, not the fabled 100-200 years.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Shaping Traditional Oral knowledge: Breathing of Eggs

Shaping Traditional Oral knowledge: Breathing of Eggs | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
Michelle Weiner's insight:

Thank you to Root Simple for pointing to this beautiful website.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Culver City News article about proposed Plastic Bag Ban

Culver City News article about proposed Plastic Bag Ban | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it

The topic of plastic bags will be on the City Council’s menu on Monday, Dec. 10, although no action will be taken that night.

 

 

 Culver City is one of the last Westside cities that have not taken a position on outlawing plastic bags, much to the chagrin of Sandrine Cassidy Schmidt, a resident and business owner. “It would have seemed logical for Culver City to pursue this much earlier,” Schmidt told the News. “However it's never too late to tackle important issues and the council's forthcoming discussion is welcome.”

 

Nearly 50 municipalities and counties throughout California have outlawed plastic bags, which are nonbiodegradable. However, advocates of eliminating what many consider to be a product that is harmful to the environment have not been as fortunate at the state level. A bill by Rep. Julia Brownley (D- Ventura), then an assemblywoman representing Santa Monica, did it not make it out of the Assembly’s Appropriations Committee in July. An earlier effort in 2010 also failed.

 

Sustainability proponents have advocated for a ban on single-use bags for the better part of two years. Transition Culver City, a local conservation and sustainability organization, has been at the forefront of the movement, holding rallies and screening “Bag IT!” an anti-plastic bag documentary in Culver City two years ago.

 

Mayor Andrew Weissman said there are certain statues that are necessary to consider before an ordinance to outlaw plastic bags can be greenlighted. “This council has consistently directed staff to pursue drafting of a single use plastic bag ordinance.  In this regard, I believe that any ordinance we adopt in Culver City should be consistent with actions staff taken in neighboring jurisdictions, both from policy and legal standpoints,” he said.    “The legal issues include CEQA requirements.  Any action taken in Culver City must satisfy the CEQA requirements and we may be able to adopt by reference the environmental findings from other cities if our ordinances are sufficiently similar.” CEQA is the California Environmental Quality Act, a 1970 state law that makes environmental protection a mandatory part of every California state and local agency's decision making process.

 

The Manhattan Beach ordinance was upheld last year by the state Supreme Court after it was challenged by the Save the Plastic Bag Coalition. According to the California Integrated Waste Management Board, approximately six billion plastic bags are consumed in Los Angeles County each year. Because plastic bags do not biodegrade in the ocean, they pose a threat to marine animals that can confuse them with food and can ingest them, leading to choking, starvation or suffocation, the board said.

 

Councilwoman Meghan Sahli-Wells has been the council’s most outspoken advocate for crafting a municipal law that would make the sale of plastic bags in Culver City illegal. Prior to a candidates forum at the Culver City Democratic Club in February, no candidate for office other than Sahli-Wells had publicly indicated support for a ban. During the forum they all indicated that they supported such a ban. The only elected official to accept an invitation to the screening of “Bag IT!” two years ago was Weissman.

 

Sahli-Wells, who as a member of Transition Culver City sought to lobby the council for a plastic bag ban two years ago, would also like to see environmental laws obeyed as well as consider any possible legal challenges. She thinks following the guidelines within the ban on the sale of plastic bags instituted on Nov. 10, 2010 by the county Board of Supervisors would be one of the easiest and safest options to follow.  “Part of the reason for (approving a countywide ban and writing a countywide environmental impact report) was so that other, smaller cities could follow their path,” said the councilwoman, who attended the meeting where the supervisors approved the ban. “It would make sense to be in line with the county.”

 

City Atty. Carol Schwab told the News in an interview earlier this year that her office would be examining several EIRs from municipalities that have enacted plastic bag bans, including Los Angeles County’s. “We think it’s a good EIR,” she said.

 

Organizations that have lobbied against banning synthetic bags include the American Progressive Bag Alliance. The group criticized the Los Angeles City Council for voting for an ordinance that would prohibit the sale of the bags over the summer. “Last week L.A. took the first step in a series of steps and processes to go ahead and ban bags and tax paper bags,” Donna Dempsey of the alliance said on June 14.  Dempsey’s claims organization bans will cause job loss, higher food prices, and pose health and even environmental risks.

Weissman said it was also crucial to have a legal document that does not hinder merchants in Culver City. “We want an ordinance that is clear and effective and doesn't place affected Culver City businesses at a competitive disadvantage,” he said.

 

 One of the concerns expressed by those who have been reluctant to support an ordinance prohibiting the sale of synthetic bags is if they are sold elsewhere in cities near Culver City but not within the city limits, businesses selling the bags might draw customers who still want them away from Culver City businesses. Schmidt, who recently sold her reusable bag company, said plastic sacks cost consumers and governments more in the long run. “Although they are provided free of charge to customers, there are significant management costs to collect and properly manage them, and significant environmental costs that cannot be mitigated,” she said.

“And after recently visiting a materials recovery facility, since there is no market for plastic bags, they end up in the landfill anyway, which is a complete tragedy,” Schmidt added. “Everyone's best bet is to bring them to those supermarkets with a bag return policy.”

 

Sahli-Wells thinks it is time for residents as well as the council to join the rest of the Westside and much of California in banning plastic bags. “If we’re going to truly call ourselves a green city, we need to do this,” she said. Schmidt concurs. “Most of the ground work has been done by Los Angeles and the county and they have the (environmental impact) report and evidence they need to avoid a lawsuit,” she noted.  “(The Culver City council) really just need to sign on it now.”

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

The City of Culver City is pleased to invite your participation in a discussion of: ALLOCATION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUNDS FOR 2013-14

Hello Ms. Casanova-
I am unable to attend the meeting on Dec. 11. I would like to submit a comment to be read aloud at the meeting:

"I am in support of funding a Community Garden, similar to the Learning Garden at Venice and Walgrove. The garden would
have multiple functions: a place for families to tend plants, learn about sustainable organic gardening best practices, benefit from
a well-managed composting program and obtain plant starts for their home or school gardens. The garden would function as an outdoor classroom. Rather than dividing plots up for individuals to tend, this truly community garden, managed by a garden master, would be open to the public. It could include a variety of plant habitats, demonstration areas, meeting patios, and a simple outdoor kitchen. A Learning Garden is a place to tend our natural environment, while we nurture our community."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Les Trois Inventeurs - I tre Inventori

In un mondo di carta, una famiglia di tre inventori cercano di portare delle innovazioni con le loro idee, ma non vengono capiti. l'articolo relativo sul blo...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Payback Time: Boycott the Brands that Helped Kill Prop 37

Payback Time: Boycott the Brands that Helped Kill Prop 37

TAKE ACTION: Join the Boycott!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Love Winter Bike Riding

5 Ways to Love Winter Bike Riding | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
If New Yorkers can do it during and after Superstorm Sandy, the rest of us can bicycle all winter long. Here's how. (RT @TreeHugger: Do you bike in the winter?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Suffragettes Jailed, Abused - So that we can have our votes counted!

Suffragettes Jailed, Abused - So that we can have our votes counted! | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it

 History of Women's Vote

 

Please view and remind yourself why you should take seriously your privilege to vote. Protect your rights by voting, no matter your party preference.


A TRUE STORY EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW!
This is the story of our Mothers and Grandmothers who lived only 90 years cago.

Remember, it was not until 1920 that women were granted the right to go to the polls and vote.

The women were innocent and defenseless, but they were jailed nonetheless for picketing the White House, carrying signs asking for the vote.

 

And by the end of the night, they were barely alive. Forty prison guards wielding clubs and their warden's blessing went on a rampage against the 33 women wrongly convicted of 'obstructing sidewalk traffic.'

(Lucy Burns)
They beat Lucy Burns, chained her hands to the cell bars above her head and left her hanging for the night, bleeding and gasping for air.

(Dora Lewis)
They hurled Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smashed her head against an iron bed and knocked her out cold. Her cell mate, Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead and suffered a heart attack. Additional affidavits describe the guards grabbing, dragging, beating, choking, slamming, pinching, twisting and kicking the women.

Thus unfolded the 'Night of Terror' on Nov. 15, 1917, when the warden at the Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia ordered his guards to teach a lesson to the suffragists imprisoned there because they dared to picket Woodrow Wilson's White House for the right to vote. For weeks, the women's only water came from an open pail. Their food--all of it colorless slop--was infested with worms.

(Alice Paul)
When one of the leaders, Alice Paul, embarked on a hunger strike, they tied her to a chair, forced a tube down her throat and poured liquid into her until she vomited. She was tortured like this for weeks until word was smuggled out to the press.

Mrs Pauline Adams in the prison garb she wore while serving a 60 day sentence.
Last week, I went to a sparsely attended screening of HBO's movie 'Iron Jawed Angels.' It is a graphic depiction of the battle these women waged so that I could pull the curtain at the polling booth and have my say. I am ashamed to say I needed the reminder.

Miss Edith Ainge, of Jamestown , New York
All these years later, voter registration is still my passion. But the actual act of voting had become less personal for me, more rote. Frankly, voting often felt more like an obligation than a privilege. Sometimes it was inconvenient.

(Berthe Arnold, CSU graduate)
My friend Wendy, who is my age and studied women's history, saw the HBO movie, too. When she stopped by my desk to talk about it, she looked angry. She was--with herself. 'One thought kept coming back to me as I watched that movie,' she said. 'What would those women think of the way I use, or don't use, my right to vote? All of us take it for granted now, not just younger women, but those of us who did seek to learn.' The right to vote, she said, had become valuable to her 'all over again.'

HBO released the movie on video and DVD . I wish all history, social studies and government teachers would include the movie in their curriculum I want it shown on Bunco/Bingo night, too, and anywhere else women gather. I realize this isn't our usual idea of socializing, but we are not voting in the numbers that we should be, and I think a little shock therapy is in order.

Conferring over ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution at National Woman's Party headquarters, Jackson Place , Washington , D.C.
Left to right: Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Mrs. Abby Scott Baker, Anita Pollitzer, Alice Paul, Florence Boeckel, Mabel Vernon (standing, right))

It is jarring to watch Woodrow Wilson and his cronies try to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane so that she could be permanently institutionalized. And it is inspiring to watch the doctor refuse. Alice Paul was strong, he said, and brave. That didn't make her crazy.

The doctor admonished the men: 'Courage in women is often mistaken for insanity.'

Please, if you are so inclined, pass this on to all the women you know. We need to get out and vote and use this right that was fought so hard for by these very courageous women. Whether you vote democratic, republican or independent party - remember to vote.

Helena Hill Weed, Norwalk , Conn. Serving 3 day sentence in D.C. prison for carrying banner, 'Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed.'
So, refresh MY memory. Some women won't vote this year because - Why, exactly?
We have carpool duties?
We have to get to work?
Our vote doesn't matter?
It's raining?
I'm so busy...I've got so much on my plate!
Read again what these women went through for you! We can't let all their suffering be for nothing.

--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Weiner
Scoop.it!

Santa Monica Bike Center pushes pedaling for commuters

Santa Monica Bike Center pushes pedaling for commuters | Eclectic Random Flotsam | Scoop.it
By the time Barry Balmat showed up at the Santa Monica Bike Center, he had already compiled a laundry list of reasons why biking to work might not work.
more...
No comment yet.