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Social media is improving health literacy in Australia's indigenous population

Social media is improving health literacy in Australia's indigenous population | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it

Around the world, social media is a disrupting and transforming force, bringing new opportunities for innovation and participation.1 In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed resources to provide guidance on using social media in health communication.2 In the United Kingdom, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement encouraged its staff to explore the potential of using social media to transform care and staff engagement.

 

In Australia, the Indigenous health sector has been at the forefront of innovative use of social media for advocacy, public health promotion and community development. Two striking examples are the Lowitja Institute’s nuanced explanation of knowledge exchange from Indigenous perspectives4and the Healing Foundation’s engaging explanation of the impact of colonisation on Indigenous health.

 

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) was an early adopter of social media, and finds it a valuable advocacy tool, according to its Chair, Justin Mohamed. It distributes daily Aboriginal health news alerts via social media. Mohamed says downloads of NACCHO’s policy submissions have increased since they have been promoted on Twitter and other online channels.

 

The popularity of user-generated content — a hallmark of social media — is being harnessed in new tobacco control programs. These include the No Smokes campaign from the Menzies School of Health Research and the Rewrite Your Story initiative by Nunkuwarrin Yunti (a community-controlled service). In New South Wales, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council uses Facebook to promote sexual health and smoking cessation.

While the digital divide is thought to be an issue relevant to remote and hard-to-reach communities, social media has been successfully used in the Torres Strait Islands to connect young people with a public health initiative in sexual health — the Kasa Por Yarn (“just for a chat”) campaign, funded by Queensland Health. Unpublished data show that Facebook, YouTube and text messaging were effective in reaching the target audience of 15–24-year-olds (Heather Robertson, Senior Network Project Officer, Cairns Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, personal communication). Patricia Fagan, a public health physician who oversaw the campaign, says that social media helped increase its reach. The campaign was using tools with appeal to young people, and, importantly, “it didn’t feel like health, it felt like socialising”. Heather Robertson, the project leader, says engaging local writers, musicians and actors in developing campaign messages and social media content was also important.

 

Social media has also been used to increase engagement with the Heuristic Interactive Technology network (HITnet), which provides touch-screen kiosks in Indigenous communities and in prisons. The kiosks embed health messages in culturally based digital storytelling. Helen Travers, Director of Creative Production and Marketing for HITnet, says this has brought wider health benefits, by developing the content-creation skills of communities. “The exciting thing for health promotion is that this kind of work is increasing digital literacy and digital inclusion”, she says.

 

Social media’s facilitation of citizen-generated movements is exemplified by the @IndigenousX Twitter account, where a different Indigenous person tweets every week, enabling many health-related discussions.

 

Innovation in service development is also being informed by the anti-hierarchical, decentralised nature of social media. The Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre is developing virtual mental health resources for Indigenous youth in remote communities. The centre’s Chief Executive Officer, Jane Burns, envisages that these will resemble a social network more than a health care intervention, and will link young people and their health care providers with online collection of data about sleep, weight, physical activity and related measures. Burns says, “It really is . . . creating a new mental health service, a new way of doing things that empowers the individual, rather than being that top-down service delivery approach”.

 

However, barriers to wider use of social media exist. Burns says that upskilling health professionals is critical. Kishan Kariippanon, a former paediatric physician studying social media and mobile phone use among youth in the Yirrkala community in Arnhem Land, says health professionals need support and encouragement to engage more creatively with technological innovations. He would like to see regular “hackathons” to bring together programmers, health professionals, innovators and community members to encourage “out of the box” thinking


Via Plus91, Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Joaquin and Austin, Zoe and Eleanor
Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

Social media ia disrupting a big in AustraliaAustralia

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Chloe and Devynne's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:12 PM

This artical talks about Australia social.  This article is a good article because its a very detailed article on what people are talking about.

KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:19 PM

This article fits into the social category because it talks about how social media is helping promote health issues

Kiann and Kenneth's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM

This article relates to the socal interaction in Australia.

 

Social Media in Australia is popular. Social websites like twitter, Facebook, YouTube and more. Social media is changing our health in the way you sleep, your weight, and physical activity.

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Axis Legal: Things To Consider About Intellectual Property Rights In Australia

Axis Legal: Things To Consider About Intellectual Property Rights In Australia | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it

Axis Legal is a specialist law firm that provides expert legal representation tailored to suit your unique business needs. We focus on giving clear, constructive and practical legal advice. Our aim is to help you achieve your particular business objectives in a commercial and cost effective manner.

Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

The law try's to help Australia's intellectual right by insuring advice and protecting .

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Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:19 PM

Things to consider about property rights in austrila❤️❤️ Sick duuude!

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Above Australia's Northern Territory

Above Australia's Northern Territory | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it
Over half of Australia lies above the Tropic of Capricorn, but it is home to only five percent of the population. It is a frontier land with little infrastructure, populated by cattle barons, crocodile hunters and aboriginal tribes.

Via Seth Dixon
Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

This is a huge chunks of Australia but only a little amount of people live there.

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Graciela Gauto's comment, September 12, 2013 12:14 PM
Que dañada esta la Tierra
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Remoteness and liveability

Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:21 PM

New territory in Australia!❤️❤️ 

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Aboriginal Culture - Aboriginal Religion and Ceremony

Aboriginal Culture - Aboriginal Religion and Ceremony | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it
Here you can find information on aboriginal religion and ceremony. Aboriginal religion is explored from its origins in the dreamtime to current practices involving body painting, dances and ceremony.

Via Emma Brennan
Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

Religion: This article shows the different religious ceremonies of the aboriginal people of Asutralia. It talks about their customs and traditions. 

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Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:22 PM

Check out this bazaar cultural tradition ❤️❤️

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Most Popular Social Media in Australia

Most Popular Social Media in Australia | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it
Social media has become very popular over the decades, and these websites have millions of users. Australia ranks fourth in worldwide social media penetration. Aussies spend more time on Facebook, Youtube and other social media sites.

Via Ava Parnell
Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

Social media has evoloted over the past decades and is in fourth place for social media penetration. 

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Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:18 PM

Wow most popular media in Australia !!!❤️❤️

Cameron & Sam's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:08 AM

This article represents social. This article is about the popular social media websites in AustraliaAustralia

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Australia National Accounts – its getting worse

Australia National Accounts – its getting worse | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it
In my assessment of the June-quarter 2012 National Accounts data the title indicated my assessment of where the economy was heading – Australian real GDP growth weakens and there is worse to come.

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Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

Economy: This article/chart shows the increases and decreases of Australia's economic topics and what is causing them. 

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Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:20 PM

See whats going on about australias national accounts

Rescooped by Geography Jordan & Danielle from Australia's Political Involvement
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How much has changed in gay rights?

How much has changed in gay rights? | Eaton & Rosen Geo | Scoop.it

"Four decades ago gay sex was illegal in every state in Australia. So called poofter-bashing was rife. There were many cases in which gay men were severely beaten by the police whose job it was to protect them.

The TV series Number 96 caused a sensation by including the first openly gay character ever seen on Australian television. And 42 years ago, the Australian Dennis Altman wrote a book called Homosexual: oppression and liberation, which became a key text for the gay liberation movement here and in many other countries.

Now, with same sex marriage a widely discussed topic in Australian politics, it's easy to look back and think everything's been achieved.

This week, the same Dennis Altman published a new book whose title is a question: The End of the Homosexual? It examines how much has changed and what's still to do.

 

I asked Dennis Altman first about the likelihood of same sex marriage becoming legal in Australia."


Via Pete, Dane Tregeagle
Geography Jordan & Danielle's insight:

Politics: This article explains how Australia is changing and becoming more open with gay marriage after so many years of it being illegal. 

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Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:23 PM

Change in gay rights in Australia❤️❤️  

Megan and Hillary's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:32 PM

this article falls into the political category because its talking about gay rights in Australia. 

Zoe and Eleanor's curator insight, October 4, 2013 1:01 PM

A big political discussion going on right now is gay rights, and Australia is no outsider to the topic.