Eating Disorders
36 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

lying to be perfect - YouTube

enjoy the movie and join me on google plus https://plus.google.com/105298030341897076393/posts
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Big Girls Finish Last -- but They do Finish

 

This movie was strong in that the protagonist was an under appreciated heavy woman with real talent. She had a happy ever after that was essentially a modern remake of Cinderella. Another strength that perhaps went unnoticed by the masses, when the three friends began to lose weight, they never developed eating disorders, and the fact that they all ended up happily ever after and successful without becoming unhealthy was a really important message. It could have been stronger (for my topic) if they developed eating disorders and this ended up making things worse for them. Another opportunity for improving the overall message of the movie is to further highlight the fact that losing weight was not what changed everything for the character. Even if it was (in this case) and even if this is the truth in today's society, this is not a message we can keep delivering to our society. This ties into threats that can potentially arise from this movie.

 

Unfortunately, as much as I loved this movie, it only further fuels the eating disorders that are caused by the media. I am afraid that I liked it so much because I could really identify with the feeling of excitement and motivation brought on by dieting and exercising. I was able to grasp the idea that inside she had always been the thin, beautiful person she had always wanted to be the whole time, but only because I was looking for it and hoping for it, egging her on. Another threat is that the antagonists in the movie did not recognize her accomplishments at the end. I suppose this could also be viewed as a strength, since she was happy anyway and since they viewed her the same even after she lost weight, but for me it was a setback. I suppose I am biased since I have had anorexia and I wanted her coworkers to feel guilty instead of continuing to feel rage. But any trigger for a girl considering anorexia is a set back.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

Preteens increasingly vulnerable to eating disorders, CHEO research finds | News in Mind

Preteens increasingly vulnerable to eating disorders, CHEO research finds | News in Mind | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
Allegra Agabian's insight:

More Uknown

 

This article is strong because it starts out with a description of a little girl in a hospital hooked up to an IV with her crying parents hunched over her, at which point you cannot argue that eating disorders are not a real sickness. It is also really powerful that they give another example of an uncommon eating disorder. However, this could also potentially be a threat because people who do not believe that eating disorders are a real problem might be able to categorize her "fear of throwing up" as something else besides intentional starving or self-hatred. This is also a weakness of the article, because even though they try to justify the fact that this type of behavior is, in fact, classified as an eating disorder, they do it in a confusing and complicated way that makes you want to stop reading. The other threat is that it has a slightly condescending tone with phrases like: 'we need to…" The last weakness of this article is that it speaks of eating disorders in terms of "severity." This might just rub me the wrong way because I'm so adamant about catching eating disorders before they get bad. But for a reader who is not totally sold on this idea, the article would not convince them to be, which is really important.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

Thin (full / HQ) - YouTube

The HBO documentary film focuses on four young women struggling with anorexia: Brittany, a 15 year-old who strives to be thin to gain acceptance among her pe...
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Power

 

This is a documentary about women and girls in an in-patient treatment center for eating disorders. It mostly focuses on the pain that these girls are experiencing and their efforts to get around the rules of the clinic even though they admitted themselves for treatment. In my opinion, this movie does an incredible job of highlighting the real struggles of this sickness by showing real life situations in which mind over matter is taken way too far. People are rightly disgusted by the conditions of the clinic because the patients have to be discharged when their insurance stops covering treatment even though they are obviously not ready. Some of the comments are rude and hateful towards the staff at the clinic, complaining that they gossip about the drama and do nothing to help the situation. Because of my personal experience, it was hard not to feel that way about the staff as well, but if I had never had an eating disorder and never been admitted to a place like this, I would probably sympathize with the nurses, therapists and nutritionists and think that the girls in the movie were just being unecessarily difficult. In this way, I think the movie has an extremely affective impact on all of the viewers, no matter what their stand point is. Eating disorders are a power struggle; this film does an excellent job of explaining that.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

Woman with anorexia to be force-fed - Herald.ie

Woman with anorexia to be force-fed - Herald.ie | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
A 22-YEAR-OLD woman who has anorexia will be fed through a tube by the order of a court.
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Should death be a choice?

 

This article is about a woman who was so malnourished after suffering from anorexia for 10 years, that her doctor made the decision to force feed her, knowing that if they were to prolong nourishment any longer, she would die. The woman had been admitted several times before and after this for severe malnourishment, but, because of her disease, was convinced she would survive and was of a healthy weight. It bothers me that this is not a question people want to explore more. Though it is a doctor's job to keep their patients alive, I can't help thinking about all the starving people in the world who have no access to food; no one bothers to save their lives. I now understand more of why people would call people such awful things such as: "anorexic bitches." This article confuses me. I thought I understood my point of view but this idea of force feeding is so powerful that it mixes me up. These kinds of graphic images are very effective. How much should the government and health insurance be involved with people with suicidal thoughts? Is it kinder to let them die and do what they wish, and save their life and hope that they appreciate it later?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

10 Body Image Lessons From Honey Boo Boo Herself

10 Body Image Lessons From Honey Boo Boo Herself | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
America’s favorite little pageant girl, Honey Boo Boo, returns to TV this Thursday. Hopefully she will be as lovable, goofy and wise as seasons past.
Allegra Agabian's insight:

An Example of What the Media Should be Doing

 

This article shows 10 gifs of child pageant start Honey Boo Boo saying realistic things that sound inspirational and moving coming out of a child's mouth. The family has their own TV show and the idea is that Honey Boo Boo and her family are what most people would call impolite, fat and gross and they are proud of it. 

 

Commentors are choosing not to focus on the positive ideas this article promotes, but rather are slamming the family further by accusing them of child pornography for entering their child into the media industry so early on in her life. The author of the article argues against this claim, but my overall feeling is that the article was not well recieved.

 

I loved this article because, to keep it simple, it made me smile. I also think that although the comments contained negative feedback towards Honey Boo Boo's family, they were still thoughtful and considerate things to say with the little girl's best interests in mind. I truly believe that if more things like this were brought into the media, more positive discussion would result from it and eventually eating disorders would become rarer and rarer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

Society influences teenage eating disorders

Society influences teenage eating disorders | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
Eating disorders have been around since ancient times. The two most common in America are anorexia and bulimia; both disorders center around an intense preoccupation with weight and calories.
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Title Says it All

 

I chose to read this article because the title presented an idea I was already familiar with but hope to learn more about when I continue my research. 

 

This article did a great job of summarizing the overall idea of eating disorders without going into too much detail. I think it was safe to assume that someone who would be likely to read this article already knew a little bit about eating disorders, since the title suggested that the article was delving deeper into the problem instead of just explaining what it was. It was also very simple and easy to follow, which is important when you are trying to teach something to an audience.

 

One weakness of this article was that it did not really delve into the issue like I thought it was going to. Another one was that it ended on a sort of vague note. It said something along the lines of: "we need to educate society so that this doesn't happen," which was not motivational or helpful at all. 

 

I think this is the case in a lot of writing because an eating disorder is such a sensitive and personal issue. I am not really sure whether it is better to go into specific examples so as to create a better argument, or whether to stay ambiguous so that more people can relate. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

New Elle Fanning Film about Body Image Is Hard to Watch—But You Should Do It Anyway

New Elle Fanning Film about Body Image Is Hard to Watch—But You Should Do It Anyway | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
The actress is amazing in the new short film.
Allegra Agabian's insight:

What is "likness"?

 

The video without this article accompanying it was a little too artsy to truly understand. I kept waiting for something to happen and was disappointed with all the metaphors. On its own, it was just disturbing. I thought the article pointed out a few key details that I would not have noticed had I just been watching the movie by itself, such as the fact that the party scene was drastically different before and after she entered the bathroom, meaning that she imagined the party to be full of emaciated models, when it was really just a house party full of normal teenagers. At the same time, I thought the pure horror of it was necessary. I also thought the way it did not outright say anything about eating disorders was a strong choice because it applied generally to self-hate, which is a much more relatable topic. Without using any words, it drew the connection between something we can all identify with, and a disease that requires more understanding, but with which it is hard to connect if we have not experienced it ourselves. 

 

Whether or not she made herself throw up was quite ambiguous and definitely arguable. Was she overcome with the grotesque illusion she had just experienced? Or did she hate herself so much that this is what she always saw when she looked in the mirror and therefore threw up as a form of direct action? I think it would be easy to complain about the scene where she was ripping her face off, simply because it does not so obviously demonstrate self-loathing rather than too much drug usage. An example of something more common and perhaps more effective, would be cutting of the wrist. I also thought, if the message was intended to be about eating disorders, she should have payed more attention to her body rather than her face. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

dove evolution - YouTube

Trailer from this director: http://chip.tl/FDTrailer Check out Body Evolution: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKQdwjGiF-s Support Dove's work here: https://...
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Deception

 

I chose to watch this video because I vaguely remember seeing something like it before and I remember being appalled at how much a beautiful girl was altered in order to fit the "beauty" standards of the media. I also know that photo shop and make-up are extremely underestimated by most people when they are exposed to the media. Even people like me who are aware of how much power those things have, are still shocked when we see videos like this; this is what makes them so important.

 

I want to learn more about how these kinds of videos affect people. To me, they appear amazingly affective. I am wondering what the next step is and how we can incorporate and bottle the outrage that comes in  reaction to this video so that we can turn it into progress.

 

My initial reaction to the model portrayed in this video alarmed me. I was disgusted with myself for thinking she was not pretty enough to model. Later, when it zoomed out to show the billboard, I was even more alarmed at how fake the THING appeared to me. I literally felt like every thing I had ever seen was a lie and, most importantly, I felt, after watching this video, that I was pretty enough to be a model.

more...
mor shwartz's curator insight, November 25, 2016 5:23 AM
חברת "דאב" מראה איך באמת נראות הדוגמניות ושאין דבר כזה יופי מושלם וכל אישה יפה בפני עצמה מציעה לאנשים להצטרף למאבק!
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

Miss Representation

Miss Representation | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it

Explore how the mainstream media's often disparaging portrayals of women contribute to the under representation of females in positions of leadership.

Allegra Agabian's insight:

Appearance over Accomplishments

 

The main idea of this movie is to draw attention to the fact that women are represented in such a way that favors their appearance over their accomplishments. This is because of the media, which, "for the first time in human history, is dictating our social norms." In other words, women are being misrepresented, and for this reason, society has skewed ideas about women and women have false expectations for themselves. People are saying that television basically portrays women as sex toys because the images are aimed to attract the attention of males ages 18 -- 30. This is more women than men actually watch TV. They are also saying that television has lost its original objective -- to entertain people -- and that it should be censored. They are saying women need to take control since they have 86% of consumer power.

 

I am so confused. To censor the media would most likely fix eating disorders completely, but that is not a democratic option. Also, while the media is destructive, no one can say it does not do its job; it is very entertaining, even if the way it accomplishes this is to be destructive to women. However, I do agree to the last part; women are just as sexist as men and need to take charge to fix this problem.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

tinybonyskinny : 'You don't look anorexic' 'WOW I MUST BE FINE THEN...' http://t.co/3KGEwtCc | Twicsy, the Twitter Pics Engine

tinybonyskinny : 'You don't look anorexic' 'WOW I MUST BE FINE THEN...' http://t.co/3KGEwtCc | Twicsy, the Twitter Pics Engine | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Anorexia is Not the Only Eating Disorder

 

This photo is so powerful because of how simple it is and, at the same time, the complexity of the idea that it is trying to portray. It succeeds in doing so -- and more -- because of its simplicity. It succeeds in showing the depression and feeling behind eating disorders and how that correlates to not eating. It is not about the way you look or how much you way so much as wanting to look and weigh something different. 


I don't think there is anything  that doesn't work about this picture, but people could easily argue that this woman is just depressed/upset instead of actually suffering from an eating disorder. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

When no one believes your daughter is sick | dailylife.com.au

When no one believes your daughter is sick | dailylife.com.au | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
Allegra Agabian's insight:

You Cannot Argue with Facts

 

This article was incredibly effective in getting feelings and emotions accross. In this way, it was able to teach the idea that an eating disorder was not a superficial choice, vain cry for attention, or anything else like that. I do not think this article had any weaknesses, although it is hard to identify weaknesses in somebody's personal experience. I suppose she could have made the descriptions a bit more graphic to pull on a few more heart strings. One way to improve the article is to improve the imagery in the writing technique. Another thing was that I found myself wanting to read more; I wish it had gone into more detail. For someone who believes that eating disorders are a choice and perhaps does not "believe that your daughter is sick," the reading did not give enough for them to work with.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

Myths About Eating Disorders - Eating Disorder Program - Adolescent Medicine - Golisano Children's Hospital - University of Rochester Medical Center

Myths About Eating Disorders - Eating Disorder Program - Adolescent Medicine - Golisano Children's Hospital - University of Rochester Medical Center | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Start a Revolution -- Challenge the Rumors

 

I chose to read this article because my lesson plan is to tackle myths and rumors and misconceptions about eating disorders. I think that the point/goal of this article is almost revolutionary because the biggest issue with eating disorders is people's misconceptions about them. I am already very aware of the problems with self-hatred that arise from judgement on eating disorders with phrases such as "anorexic bitch" and assumptions that anorexia and bulimia are just a spoiled cry for attention. I was intrigued by the mention of the rumor that eating disorders are just a "teenage phase" and therefore treatment is ineffective because people assume that a limited amount of nourishment and counseling shall solve everything. I want to look into this more. I think it would be powerful if I advocated the fact that children and other people with eating disorders need more attention and time in treatment. I want to find evidence of lack of effort on the part of the treatment institutions and also evidence of relapse and ineffectiveness. The one other point from this article that really spoke to me was the claim that people of a normal weight can also have eating disorders. I will focus on this in my presentation as well.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons To Date A Girl With An Eating Disorder

5 Reasons To Date A Girl With An Eating Disorder | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
For masculine men
Allegra Agabian's insight:

5 Reasons More Girls Are Developing Eating Disorders

 

The chauvinistic pig who wrote this article clearly has no concept of how sick peope with eating disorders actually are; he talks about eating disorders as if they are privilege for the man whose lover suffers from this disease. He made the point that an eating disorder is "declared a luxury reserved for only the most privileged members of the female race. In other words, the presence of one of the classic eating disorders is a reliable predictor of various socio-economic, cultural, and personality traits in a young woman–features that, in the end, are desirable to today’s American man." In other words, he values the objectification of women so that he and the rest of his sex may enjoy themselves to the fullest while more and more women suffer from these kinds of diseases in an effort to please them and gain approval, which is no doubt happening.

 

What truly bothers me about this article is the way it functions as a horrendous form of sexism. Before the self-proclaimed masculine man lists his reasons to date a girl with an eating disorder, he states that "While obesity is, in most cases, also an “eating disorder,” this list doesn’t apply to emotional eaters, food addicts, and fatties with no self control." I believe he would have come off as even more ignorant had he left out this distinction, but for me this actually works against him further. If he is knowledgable enough to realize that overeating is also an eating disorder, shame on him for praising anorexia and bulimia. To refer to suffering individuals as "fatties with no self control" is like calling terminally ill people "cancerous bitches who are going to die soon anyway."


However irksome his comments and points may be, I fear they may have some truth to them. I want to reasearch further the relationship between socio-economic class and restrictive eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. After that I think it's important to look at the statistics of increase in such eating behaviors what with people like this sharing their opinions online.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allegra Agabian
Scoop.it!

4 Reasons Not To Date A Girl With An Eating Disorder

4 Reasons Not To Date A Girl With An Eating Disorder | Eating Disorders | Scoop.it
Tweet. Several weeks back, Brother Tuthomosis posted an article titled 5 Reasons To Date A Girl With An Eating Disorder. Although it was meant as a ribald jest, many voices came forward to protest the insensitivity displayed ...
Allegra Agabian's insight:

Heroic but Ignorant

 

The author of this peice showed the horrible side of eating disorders in an effort to counteract the damage done by the man who wrote the article: "5 Reasons to Date a Girl with an Eating Disorder." She highlighted the unnatural and unappealing natures of girls suffering from eating disorders. To accentuate this, she also shone a positive light on girls who refrained from such activities and called them: "heroic."

 

What somewhat undermined her argument was the extent to which she used bulimia as an example -- it gives you bad breath, it rots your teeth, etc... -- and used sarcasm to compare suffering girls with healthy ones with the phrase "however heroic it may be to stick your finger down your throat." The only time she mentions anorexia is to explain a set of mental disorders that comes with it and she made a sweeping generalization/assumption. Another thing that made me say "ouch" was the way she so blatantly finished the article, suggesting that girls with eating disorders are sick, gross creatures that should be avoided. We need to help them!!

 

This article reminds me of the extremist opinion that eating disorders are a choice and a plea for attention. I think that a part of this is true but I want to do research to show that it develops or perhaps always was a real sickness and a real issue that needs to be addressed.

more...
No comment yet.