Earth & Environmental Science
54 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

The Anthropocene epoch: scientists declare dawn of human-influenced age

The Anthropocene epoch: scientists declare dawn of human-influenced age | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Experts say human impact on Earth so profound that Holocene must give way to epoch defined by nuclear tests, plastic pollution and domesticated chicken
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

App of the Week: Browse the Earth's visual history - eSchool News

App of the Week: Browse the Earth's visual history - eSchool News | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it

EarthViewer is like a time machine for exploring Earth’s deep history. Based on the latest scientific research, it lets you scroll through the last 4.5 billion years with your fingertips. Follow a favorite landmark, be it Greenland or New York City, as its position shifts through time, or watch a famous fossil like Tiktaalik make an incredible journey from its origin to its current location. Layer your view of shifting continents with data on atmospheric composition, temperature, biodiversity, day length, and solar luminosity, to get a more complete view of our dynamic planet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Sir David on mission to breathe life into neglected fish fossils - Sydney Morning Herald

Sir David on mission to breathe life into neglected fish fossils - Sydney Morning Herald | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Sir David on mission to breathe life into neglected fish fossils Sydney Morning Herald The naturalist and wildlife broadcaster Sir David Attenborough has described a collection of Australian fossils neglected by the state's natural history museum...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Newly Discovered Fossils of Ancient Lifeform Are 2.2 Billion Years Old

Newly Discovered Fossils of Ancient Lifeform Are 2.2 Billion Years Old | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Newly discovered fossils are 2.2 billion years old and push the greening of the Earth way back in time.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Scientists find 12 new active volcanoes in Alaska and expect to keep finding more - Daily Mail

Scientists find 12 new active volcanoes in Alaska and expect to keep finding more - Daily Mail | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Daily Mail Scientists find 12 new active volcanoes in Alaska and expect to keep finding more Daily Mail But research on the years-long project have been able to follow a trail of similar volcanoes that leads from the interior of Canada using their...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

'Invisibility' cloak could dampen blow from earthquakes

Researchers say giant rubber cylinders coated with special wave-scattering materials could act as a 'seismic waveguide' and dissipate the punch from earthquakes. Read this article by Martin LaMonica on CNET News.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Twitter / Earth_Pics: Volcano eruption from space. ...

Twitter / Earth_Pics: Volcano eruption from space. ... | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
RT @Earth_Pics: Volcano eruption from space. http://t.co/mz5TFTDBvm
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Copahue volcano eruption imminent - MercoPress

Copahue volcano eruption imminent - MercoPress | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Yahoo! News Copahue volcano eruption imminent MercoPress After the Copahue volcano on the Neuquén provincial Andean border with Chile began spewing smoke due to an increase in seismic activity, a red alert was issued by Chilean authorities ordering...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

The Science of Earthquakes by Weather Underground

The Science of Earthquakes by Weather Underground | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Animal Pompeii: Exquisitely preserved feathered dinosaur fossils date back to a catastrophic event

Animal Pompeii: Exquisitely preserved feathered dinosaur fossils date back to a catastrophic event | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it

A series of fossil discoveries in the 1990s changed our understanding of the lives of early birds and mammals, as well as the dinosaurs they shared an ecosystem with. All those discoveries had one thing in common: they came from a small region in northern China that preserved what is now called the Jehol Biota.

 

Until now, however, no one knew why so many well-preserved fossils were found in that region. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers discovered that this remarkable preservation might have been the result of a Pompeii-like event, where hot ash from a volcanic eruption entombed these animals.

 

According to Leicester University's Sarah Gabbott (who wasn’t involved in the study), “Unravelling the environments in which fossilization took place, as the authors do in this paper, is very important. It places the fossils within the context of their habitat and it allows us to determine what filters and biases may have played a part.” These biases may affect which organisms get preserved.

 

The fossils of the Jehol Biota are from the Early Cretaceous period, about 130 million years ago, and they comprise a wide variety of animals and plants. So far, about 60 species of plants, 1,000 species of invertebrates, and 140 species of vertebrates have been found in the Jehol Biota.

 

One of the most remarkable discoveries to arise from these fossils came in 2010, when Michael Benton of the University of Bristol found colour-banding preserved in dinosaur fossils. These stripes of light and dark are similar to stripes in modern birds, and they provided further evidence that dinosaurs evolved into birds. Benton also found that these fossils had intact mealnosomes—organelles that make pigments. This discovery allowed paleontologists to tell the colors of dinosaurs' feathers for the first time.

 

The area that supported the Jehol Biota is suspected to have been a wetland with many lakes. Most fossils are found in lakebeds, suggesting that either the fossils were washed into these lakes by floods or that the animals were in the lakes before fossilization took place.

 

Baoyu believes that if fossils don't separate bone joints, it means the animals must have been in the lake before dying. But that is not a convincing argument, Gabbott said. "A freshly dead carcass, buoyed by decay gases which collect in the stomach, can be transported for tens if not hundreds of kilometers without such disarticulation."

 

No other fossil location, let alone that which produced so many well-preserved samples, has ever been suggested to have undergone a similar event. However, a comparison can be made to what happened in Pompeii in 79 AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted. The ensuing destruction led to the preservation of the city’s architecture and objects but not of people or animals. The human and animal remains we see from Pompeii are plaster casts of the empty spaces their decomposed bodies left in the ash.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Roadworkers uncover fossil treasure trove (Catalyst, ABC TV Science)

Roadworkers uncover fossil treasure trove (Catalyst, ABC TV Science) | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
A team of roadworkers have unearthed fossils of ancient crocodiles, fish, shells and plants in the city of Brisbane.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Volcano still restless as rain fills crater lake - New Zealand Herald

Volcano still restless as rain fills crater lake - New Zealand Herald | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Volcano still restless as rain fills crater lake
New Zealand Herald
"The heat flow from the volcano is maybe also not as high as it was last year," Mr Scott said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Three Triceratops fossils excavated west of Black Hills in Wyoming - The Missoulian

Three Triceratops fossils excavated west of Black Hills in Wyoming - The Missoulian | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Three Triceratops fossils excavated west of Black Hills in Wyoming
The Missoulian
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) – The recent discovery of three Triceratops fossils in Wyoming could include the most complete skeleton of the three-horned dinosaur to date.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Ancient plants reawaken: Plants exposed by retreating glaciers regrowing after centuries entombed under ice

Ancient plants reawaken: Plants exposed by retreating glaciers regrowing after centuries entombed under ice | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
When Catherine La Farge threads her way through the recently exposed terrain left behind by retreating glaciers, she looks at the ancient plant remains a lot closer than most.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian
Scoop.it!

Pumice washing up from underwater volcano - New Zealand Herald

Pumice washing up from underwater volcano - New Zealand Herald | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Pumice washing up from underwater volcano
New Zealand Herald
Pumice washing up from underwater volcano. By Peter de Graaf of the Northern Advocate. 5:20 PM Wednesday May 29, 2013. ✩ Save. Facebook 0. Twitter 0.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Angela Brady, Teacher Librarian from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

World's oldest flowing water, trapped in mine for billions of years

World's oldest flowing water, trapped in mine for billions of years | Earth & Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Water found in a deep, isolated reservoir in Timmins, Ont., has been trapped there for 1.5 billion to 2.64 billion years — since around the time the first multicellular life arose on the planet — Canadian and British scientists say.

 

The water pouring out of boreholes 2.4 kilometres below the surface in the northern Ontario copper and zinc mine is older than any other free-flowing water ever discovered. It is rich in dissolved gases such as hydrogen and methane that could theoretically provide support for microbial life.

 

"What we can be sure of is that we have identified a way in which planets can create and preserve an environment friendly to microbial life for billions of years," said a statement from Greg Holland, the Lancaster University geochemist who is the lead author of the study.

 

His Canadian co-authors included Barbara Sherwood Lollar and Georges Lacrampe-Couloume at the University of Toronto; Greg Slater at McMaster University in Hamilton; and Long Li, who is currently an assistant professor at the University of Alberta, but worked on the project while at the University of Toronto.

 

Some Canadian members of the team are currently testing the water to see if it contains microbial life — if they exist, those microbes may have been isolated from the sun and the Earth's surface for billions of years and may reveal how microbes evolve in isolation.

 

Microbes that have been isolated for tens of millions of years have been found in water with similar chemistry at even slightly deeper depths below the surface in a South African gold mine, using hydrogen gas as an energy source, the researchers noted.

 

The researchers estimated how old the water was based on an analysis of the xenon gas dissolved in it. Like many other elements, xenon comes in forms with different masses, known as isotopes. The water in the Timmins mine contained an unusually high level of lighter isotopes of xenon that are thought to have come from the Earth's atmosphere at the time it became trapped.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.