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Rescooped by Ahmed Samir from Strange days indeed...
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10 Clever Bets You'll (Almost) Never Lose

10 Clever Bets You'll (Almost) Never Lose | earth | Scoop.it

Quirkology's Richard Wiseman is back with another roundup of devious little pub tricks.Read more...


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Rescooped by Ahmed Samir from Advertising, I say
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10 Things In Advertising You Need To Know This Morning

10 Things In Advertising You Need To Know This Morning | earth | Scoop.it
Facebook reproted that 62 percent of its ad dollars come from mobile.

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Rescooped by Ahmed Samir from Amazing Science
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | earth | Scoop.it

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

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All my Tweets and Scoop.It! posts sorted and searchable:

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You can search through all the articles semantically on my

archived twitter feed

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Arturo Pereira's curator insight, August 12, 2017 9:01 AM
The democratization of knowledge!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 11, 2017 2:42 AM
FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities
Rescooped by Ahmed Samir from Amazing Science
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Searching for extraterrestrial intelligence by identifying alien atmospheric polluters

Searching for extraterrestrial intelligence by identifying alien atmospheric polluters | earth | Scoop.it

New research by theorists at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) shows that we could spot the fingerprints of certain pollutants under ideal conditions. This would offer a new approach in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).


“We consider industrial pollution as a sign of intelligent life, but perhaps civilizations more advanced than us, with their own SETI programs, will consider pollution as a sign of unintelligent life since it’s not smart to contaminate your own air,” said Harvard student and lead author Henry Lin.

 

“People often refer to ETs as ‘little green men,’ but the ETs detectable by this method should not be labeled ‘green’ since they are environmentally unfriendly,” added co-author Avi Loeb, Harvard’s Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science.

 

The team, which also includes Smithsonian scientist Gonzalo Gonzalez Abad, finds that the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) should be able to detect two kinds of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) — ozone-destroying chemicals used in solvents and aerosols. They calculated that JWST could tease out the signal of CFCs if atmospheric levels were 10 times those on Earth. A particularly advanced civilization might intentionally pollute the atmosphere to high levels and globally warm a planet that is otherwise too cold for life.

 

There is one big caveat to this work. JWST can only detect pollutants on an Earth-like planet circling a white dwarf star, which is what remains when a star like our sun dies. That scenario would maximize the atmospheric signal. Finding pollution on an Earth-like planet orbiting a sun-like star would require an instrument beyond JWST — a next-next-generation telescope.

 

The team notes that a white dwarf might be a better place to look for life than previously thought, since recent observations found planets in similar environments. Those planets could have survived the bloating of a dying star during its red giant phase, or have formed from the material shed during the star’s death throes.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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