Early Stage 1- Identities-family,friends,Aboriginal language group
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Our many identities | Global Education

Our many identities | Global Education | Early Stage 1- Identities-family,friends,Aboriginal language group | Scoop.it

INTRO VIDEO (first 3 min)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaBln7ITO3A

Ji Yoon Kim's insight:

After reading the Rainbow Fish students are expected to have sound understanding of the concept ‘identity’. While the storybook explored the identity of the Rainbow Fish, during this lesson they are expected to explore their own identity in-depth.

 

Students are asked to bring  photographs that captures them being with friends, family and or engaging in activities. They are going to write a sentence starting with “I am…” underneath each photograph. Each student will present their photographs to the class and say how they have identified themselves. Observe and give constructive feedback while students are presenting their photographs and explaining their identity. Try to constantly observe students’ engagement and take notes of the contributions they make during discussion- this will help in making qualitative assessment at the end of the lesson.

 

Using the IWB show photos of children from different parts of the world and the first 3 minutes of the video (link embedded in the website) and discuss if the students can find any similarities of differences.  Initiate discussions around why children in developing countries need to walk long miles to obtain water and how their lives and our lives are different.

 

Briefly discuss how we can conserve water to sustain our environment. Be careful of language used during the lesson, try not to label people in the photos but focus on the similarities and differences. This will help students to be in the ethno relativism stage where they are able to accept different culture and in terms of dress, language and value system (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.293).

 

This lesson can be linked to a literacy session where students get to write an acrostic poem with their names (ENe-11D- responds to and composes simple texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences). Acrostic poems can be displayed around the classroom enriching students’ sense of identity and belonging in the classroom. 

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Pak Yono

Ji Yoon Kim's insight:

Before reading “Pak Yono” write down a list of vocabularies related to 'farming' that students need to know in order to understand the text. The PDF file can be shown using the IWB and use shared reading strategies to read the text as a whole class. While reading, ask questions directly related to home, family, roles and responsibilities.  

 

Follow up activities should be provided such as matching roles and responsibilities with the appropriate character, filling out a table of similarities and differences between Pak Yono’s family and the students’ families. Observe students’ level of engagement and collect their finished activities to see how if they were able to identify similarities and or differences. Allow students to work as individuals or in pairs if they need extra support.

 

By this stage students should feel quite comfortable discussing about different people and the groups that they belong. However, be aware that some students can “react strongly to multicultural issues if they are pushed too hard or too fast and this may result in them not participating in class” (Wells, 2008, p.143). Farming in Asian countries can be quite different to farming in Australia. This may cause some students to react differently due to the stereotyped image they had earlier.Try to break this stereotypical views before and during the lesson.

 

The section where Pak Yono and the aunt go to the market to sell rice will provide great examples to incorporate numeracy strategies using money. Give questions that involve the use of money and profit. For example, If I had 10 sacks of rice and sold 1 sack of rice to Jack, and 2 sacks of rice to Tom how many sacks of rice do I have now?(MA2-3WM- uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representation to support conclusions).  

 

References: Wells, R. (2008). The Global and the Multicultural: Opportunities, Challenges, and Suggestions for Teacher Education.Multicultural Perspectives, 10(3), 142-149. 

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The Rainbow Fish

Book- Read aloud of The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister.
Ji Yoon Kim's insight:

The Rainbow Fish is a beautifully illustrated story book that captures notions of identity, uniqueness and friendship. The YouTube video is a recorded version of the book and can be played on the interactive white board making it accessible for all students to read and listen. Early stage 1 learners should initially read this for enjoyment until they are familiar with the plot. Then, the teacher can initiate the discussion by asking questions such as "what made the Rainbow Fish different from the rest?" "Can anyone tell me why the Rainbow fish felt lonely?" The teacher should ask series of questions that relate to friendship and individuality and ask what makes each student unique. In order to engage all students try grouping them in pairs to share their responses. This lesson links well with a writing session where students get to write how they would have responded to such crisis in friendship and identity if they were the Rainbow Fish. Give students a sentence starter such as "If I were the Rainbow Fish I would…" 

In this lesson drama can be used as an engaging assessment strategy. Still image can be used to observe students' understanding of the text and hot seating can be implemented to observe students' responses on questions such as "How did you feel when you were the only fish with the rainbow scales?", "Was it the scales that made you unique or your personality?" and "How did you feel when you were alone and when you were with friends?"



Early stage 1 learners are gradually moving away from ego-centric perspectives so it is recommended that the curriculum follows that pattern as well (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.297). The Rainbow Fish is only an introduction to the concept of identity and friends. Use this story book to scaffold vocabularies such as identity, friendship, unique, belonging, and caring and etc. 

 

References:

Pfister,M.(2012,April 27). The Rainbow Fish. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6S4IPMs5ZY

 

 

Gilbert,R.& Hoepper,B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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My place, your place | Global Education-Activity 1

My place, your place | Global Education-Activity 1 | Early Stage 1- Identities-family,friends,Aboriginal language group | Scoop.it

http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/my-place,-your-place.html#activity1

 

http://www.hgpho.to/wfest/house/house-e.html

Ji Yoon Kim's insight:

Global Education  is a useful website with a variety of resources for teachers and students. Identity is not static and is influenced by relationships so it is important for young students to “understand how they have come to be as they are” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.292). While the “Rainbow Fish”  discussed individual identity and created scaffold for new concepts and vocabularies, “Our many identities” extended this idea by identifying multiple identities and comparing differences and similarities with people from different cultural groups. "My place, your place" further consolidates the concept of family and its importance in identity.  

 

Activity 1 is only a guideline to the kind of lessons that can be prepared to teach ES1 learners about identity and the groups that individuals belong to e.g. family (CUES1). When planning for this lesson be mindful of sensitive issues such as single parent, step parent and factors influenced by socio economic status. Group students in pairs and ask them to share what kind of activities they do at home such as eating, playing, doing homework and etc.

 

As a whole class ask students to what kind of roles the members of their family have, such as cleaning, washing the dish, taking the dog out for a walk and etc. Brainstorm their responses on the whiteboard and initiate discussion about why different members of the family have different roles and responsibilities.

 

The website “Houses around the world” shows photographs of traditional houses in different countries. As a whole class use these photos to identity their distinct features, similarities and differences between their own homes.

 

For this lesson I recommend conducting a qualitative assessment because I find it more appropriate to observe students’ level of engagement during the discussion time. For students who are shy or less willing to participate in classroom discussion can be grouped in pairs and say what their partner said which removes pressure of answering the wrong answer. Moreover, as inclusive global educators we should recognise the “diverse cultural, linguistic, physical, mental, and cognitive complexities” of our students (Landorf &Nevin, 2007, p.712).

 

This lesson can be linked to maths lessons where students identify different shapes in their house. Give a sheet of table where students write down the name of the object and what kind of 2D shapes it represents, e.g. clock-circle, rug-oval, door-rectangle. (Note: Mae15MG- manipulates, sorts and describes representation of two dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, squares and rectangles, using everyday language). Use visual aids such as drawings on the board and pictures to illustrate edges, sides and faces.

 

References: Landorf,H., &Nevin,A. (2007). Inclusive global education: implications for social justice. Journal of Educational Administration, 45(6), 711-723. 

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspective - Topic 2 My Place, My Country

Appendix

http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/assets/pdf/caring/caringplace5.pdf

Ji Yoon Kim's insight:

Incorporating Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) perspective in a kindergarten class can be a challenging task. However, it is vital that our students are very well aware of ATSI perspective. Teachers are always encouraged and should consult the local Elder to obtain their ideas and views about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Gilbert&Hoepper, 2011, p.387).  When conducting the lesson appropriate acknowledgement should be made to the land and this also helps ES1 learners to see and experience how ATSI are valued in our mainstream society.

 

Topic 2- My place, my country is a great starting point for ES1 learners to identify which part of Aboriginal land they live in. Prepare a map of Australia that shows the name of Aboriginal language group and My Country by Connie Ah See (provided in the appendix). As a whole class read the story together and group students into their table groups to complete the activities. Ask students to locate where certain group of Aboriginal people belong and which part of the Aboriginal land they live in.  Monitor and observe students’ learning as they are engaged in the lesson. When students finish their activities take notes and photographs of their completed work and make summative assessment.   

 

The resource provides masks of animals that appear in the Dream TIme Stories. If students seem to show lack of engagement during the lesson start decorating the masks to gain their attention and initiate genuine interest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and language. 

 

A literacy session can be developed using words from the Aboriginal language (vocabulary list provided on page 24). For example, one student makes a sentence in English and then the other student replaces a particular word and or a phrase in to Aboriginal language. This activity can be conducted in pairs, or the teacher can perform a joint construction of text in English but incorporating Aboriginal words. 

 

 

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