e-Xploration
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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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The Illusion of Privacy: You are Not in Control - Fake It!. #privacy #dataawareness

The Illusion of Privacy: You are Not in Control - Fake It!. #privacy #dataawareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Are you an avid user of Snapchat, that kind of person who likes bits that go poof? If you or your kids are under 25, chances are you do. The wildly popular photo-sharing app—which promises that pictures self-destruct after 10 seconds—is a clear sign that many people long for privacy. Snapchat claims to have finally delivered to us a medium that does not forever save and store our data. We want that! Of course we do.

Unfortunately, Snapchat doesn’t quite transport us to the land of data privacy. It sounds too good to be true, and it is. In much the same way that Facebook deludes people into the belief that they can actually be private, it gives us a false sense of security. Twitter makes no bones about privacy; it is, and claims to be, an open public network where you are public by default. With the likes Snapchat and Facebook—and most of social media, in fact—many mistakenly believe in the illusion of being private.

 

The specific problem with Snapchat, of course, is that while the photo message on Snapchat disappears from the phone of the recipient after a few seconds, it does not prevent the nimble-fingered receiver from taking a screenshot. If that happens you get an alert, but what good does that really do? It certainly doesn’t prevent the screenshot from being shared with others, as happened at this New Jersey high school. There’s another hack to work around that alert. And last but far from least, a US-based company Decipher Forensics told the Guardian that they figured out how to recover photos from the Android version of Snapchat in a matter of days. The company is now trying to recover photos from the iOS version of Snapchat. The photo-app has been downloaded more than five million times in the Android marketplace and has been at the top of the Apple app store for quite a while.

 

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Modelling and Analysis of User Behaviour in Online Communities. #roles #analytics

Modelling and Analysis of User Behaviour in Online Communities Sofia Angeletou, Matthew Rowe and Harith Alani Knowledge Media Institute, The Open U
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Carbon Visuals: New York's carbon emissions - in real time. #dataviz #CO2 #Environment

Carbon Visuals: New York's carbon emissions - in real time. #dataviz #CO2 #Environment | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

In 2010 New York City added 54 million metric tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere (75% from buildings, the bulk of the rest from transport) but that number means little to most people because few of us have a sense of scale for atmospheric pollution.

 

Carbon Visuals, supported by Environmental Defense Fund, have created a film that makes those emissions feel more real - the total emissions and the rate of emission. Designed to engage the ‘person on the street’, this version is exploratory and still work in progress.

 

Emissions in 2010 were 12% less than 2005 emissions. The City of New York is on track to reduce emissions by 30% by 2017 - an ambitious target. Mayor Bloomberg’s office has not been involved in the creation or dissemination of this video.

See how we can help cities engage their citizens in carbon issues.

See video on YouTube

 

Street-level view of 10 metre (33 ft) spheres of carbon dioxide gas emerging at a rate of one every 0.58 seconds

 

For the technically minded:

In 2010 (the latest year for which data is available) New York City added 54,349,650 metric tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere = 148,903 tons a day = 6,204 tons an hour = 1.72 tons a second.

 

City of New York, Inventory of New York City Greenhouse Gas Emissions, September 2011, by Jonathan Dickinson and Andrea Tenorio. Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability, New York, 2011

At standard pressure and 59 °F a metric ton of carbon dioxide gas would fill a sphere 33 feet across (density of CO₂ = 1.87 kg/m⊃3;).

 

If this is how carbon dioxide gas was actually emitted in New York we would see one of these spheres appear every 0.58 seconds.

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(VU SUR LE WEB) Les recherches Google en temps réel. #dataviz

(VU SUR LE WEB) Les recherches Google en temps réel. #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Google propose une nouvelle fonctionnalité dans son onglet "Tendance des recherches" : la possibilité de visualiser en temps réel les recherches effectuées sur le réseau.
luiy's insight:

Google propose une nouvelle fonctionnalité dans son onglet « Tendance des recherches » : la possibilité de visualiser en temps réel les recherches effectuées sur le réseau. Cette fonctionnalité n’est disponible actuellement que pour 11 régions du monde (Etats-Unis, Taiwan, Inde, Japon, Australie, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Royaume-Uni, Singapour, Russie) mais l’interface est fluide et sympathique.

 

Google permet aussi de visualiser les tops des recherches aux Etats-Unis, depuis 2004, selon différents critères : auteurs, équipes de basket, éléments chimiques, pop stars,… Et d’intégrer ces divers éléments dans ses sites.

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Narcotwits y tecnologías web para empoderar al ciudadano. #narcotwits

Narcotwits y tecnologías web para empoderar al ciudadano. #narcotwits | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Información sobre tecnologías emergentes & impacto en negocios & sociedad
luiy's insight:

El objetivo es ayudar a los usuarios a evaluar la fiabilidad de la información que reciben de los medios sociales mediante el análisis del comportamiento de los reporteros ciudadanos. En concreto, Monroy, en colaboración con los otros autores de la investigación “Narcotuits: Social Media en tiempos de Guerra” ha recogido y analizado un importante volumen de datos de hashtags (etiquetas que permiten seguir un tema) como #Mtyfollows o #RiesgoMty. Por ejemplo, 600.000 tuits que contenían algúnhashtag relacionado con la guerra de la droga.

 

El enfoque social que desde sus inicios como investigador ha mostrado Monroy se sembró en su niñez. Su familia estuvo muy involucrada en movimientos políticos progresistas durante los años 80. Y a este entorno se unió su fascinación por la ciencia y la tecnología. “Me gustaba mucho leer una revista científica para niños llamada Chispa, de la cual aprendí mucho, y la enciclopedia Proteo, que era mitad historia de ciencia ficción sobre un robot y mitad enciclopedia científica”, recuerda el joven.

 

En la actualidad, Monroy trabaja en Microsoft Research y en el Centro Berkman para Internet y Sociedad en la Universidad de Harvard, ambas en EE.UU.. Desde ahí sigue trabajando para promover la participación ciudadana. “Más allá de mi interés personal por el hecho de ser algo que aflige a mi país de origen, el caso de los narcotuits me pareció fascinante desde el punto de vista científico porque las redes sociales han permitido que los ciudadanos tomen el rol del Estado y de los medios de comunicación tradicionales", explica. Por ello Monroy destaca el papel del ciudadano como seleccionador de contenidos; más aún teniendo en cuenta la dificultad que entraña la misma propagación de la información o -lo más difícil de cuantificar- la desinformación.

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danah boyd | Regulating the Use of Social Media Data. #dataawareness #privacy

danah boyd | Regulating the Use of Social Media Data. #dataawareness #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

If you were to walk into my office, I’d have a pretty decent sense of your gender, your age, your race, and other identity markers. My knowledge wouldn’t be perfect, but it would give me plenty of information that I could use to discriminate against you if I felt like it. The law doesn’t prohibit me for “collecting” this information in a job interview nor does it say that discrimination is acceptable if you “shared” this information with me. That’s good news given that faking what’s written on your body is bloody hard. What the law does is regulate how this information can be used by me, the theoretical employer. This doesn’t put an end to all discrimination – plenty of people are discriminated against based on what’s written on their bodies – but it does provide you with legal rights if you think you were discriminated against and it forces the employer to think twice about hiring practices.

 

The Internet has made it possible for you to create digital bodies that reflect a whole lot more than your demographics. Your online profiles convey a lot about you, but that content is produced in a context. And, more often than not, that context has nothing to do with employment. This creates an interesting conundrum. Should employers have the right to discriminate against you because of your Facebook profile? One might argue that they should because such a profile reflects your “character” or your priorities or your public presence. Personally, I think that’s just code for discriminating against you because you’re not like me, the theoretical employer.

 

Of course, it’s a tough call. Hiring is hard. We’re always looking for better ways to judge someone and goddess knows that an interview plus resume is rarely the best way to assess whether or not there’s a “good fit.” It’s far too tempting to jump on the Internet and try to figure out who someone is based on what we can drudge up online. This might be reasonable if only we were reasonable judges of people’s signaling or remotely good at assessing them in context. Cuz it’s a whole lot harder to assess someone’s professional sensibilities by their social activities if they come from a world different than our own.

 

Given this, I was fascinated to learn that the German government is proposing legislation that would put restrictions on what Internet content employers could use when recruiting.

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#databrokers : Acxiom exposed, A peek inside one of the world’s largest data brokers #dataawareness

#databrokers : Acxiom exposed, A peek inside one of the world’s largest data brokers #dataawareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Acxiom knows where you live, where you shop and what you like to do. But it's not quite the evil data monolith you might expect.
luiy's insight:

Acxiom is one of the largest data brokers in the world, yet few average consumers know much about it. You’re about to find out a bit more. But before I get into that I’d like to correct two errors related to Acxiom that appeared recently in TY4NS.

 

Contrary to a report published in the Financial Times, which was later repeated by CNETand yours truly, Acxiom is not planning to open the kimono and let us all take a peek inside at the data it has collected about us. According to an Acxiom spokesperson, while the company is looking into the possibility of offering more transparency to consumers, it’s not yet on their radar, in part due to the enormous engineering challenges such disclosure would entail.

 

Second: A while back I ran an interview with Ray Everett, currently director of advertising privacy at Yahoo, in which I called him the first person to hold the title of Chief Privacy Officer for any organization. Well, turns out I was wrong there too. Ray got tabbed as CPO for the now defunct AllAdvantage in 1999. That’s 8 years after Jennifer Barrett Glasgowdoffed that title for Acxiom. (If there any CPOs who’ve held the title longer, please ping me – I’m keeping a scrapbook.)

 

So I when was offered the opportunity to interview the oldest — err, longest tenured -- privacy officer in the world, I jumped at the chance. But first some background about Acxiom.

Most people know the company as a data broker. Some people know it as an online tracking company. But very few know that Acxiom is also an IT services firm. Given that it’s been gathering data about hundreds of millions of consumers since 1969, storing it on banks of mainframes at its headquarters in Little Rock and elsewhere, that shouldn’t be surprising. According to Gartner, Acxiom is one of the top three mainframe outsource providers in North America.

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The politics of autocomplete :: Society of the Query. #algorithms


Via Dominique Cardon
luiy's insight:

Cultural impact

 

Such manipulations question the alleged democratic principle of autocomplete. Do the suggestions really represent what people search for? Even if they do, we may question the “wisdom of crowds” (Surowiecki) as masses have always had the potential to turn into mobs. Can autocomplete foster prejudices by re-producing them with its suggestions? Does it manipulate the public similar as big tabloids do, as Krystian Woznicki wonders? Romanians, for example, were confronted with not very flattering predictions for the query “Romanians are”: “scum”, “ugly”, “rude” were among Google´s associations. A campaign tried to change this by asking users to google for positive attributes like “Romanians are smart”. Try yourself if it was successful (at my computer in the Netherlands it doesn´t seem so).

 

I would love to hear more about your experience (maybe even research?) on autocomplete. What do the suggestions tell us about our societies and how can we use them for social research? Soon, I´m going to write more about a cross-cultural comparison of autocomplete suggestions here.

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Social network analysis, predictive coding enlisted to fight fraud -- GCN. #SNA #cibercrime

Social network analysis, predictive coding enlisted to fight fraud -- GCN. #SNA #cibercrime | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
New analytic technologies will help agencies and investigators look deeper into behavioral patterns to combat some of the more sophisticated fraud schemes on the horizon.
luiy's insight:

Technology that incorporates social network analysis, which helps establish connections and relationships between people, and predictive coding, which provides machine-learning techniques that help systems learn fraud patterns, are among the weapons agencies are enlisting to combat fraudulent payments, according to industry experts.

 

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services is using social network and predictive analytics from SAS Analytics to identify potential fraud and prevent improper assistance payments. The Data Mining Solution for Child Care Welfare Fraud Detection, based on the SAS Fraud Framework for Government and SAS data mining techniques, debuted in May 2011.

 

Using the software, DPSS investigators detected two conspiring groups and mapped a network of participants and providers to display their relationships. Using the framework’s social relationship network capabilities, they created a display showing a web of complex relations linked by common telephone numbers and addresses. In one case, DPSS staff found a child care provider serving many participants working together in fraudulent activities.

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#SNA : Drug Marketers Use Social Network Diagrams to Help Locate Influential Doctors #health #bigdata

#SNA : Drug Marketers Use Social Network Diagrams to Help Locate Influential Doctors #health #bigdata | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Consulting companies like Activate Networks use social network diagrams to help pharmaceutical marketers identify prescribing histories and relationships among doctors.
luiy's insight:

The information allows drug makers to know which drugs a doctor is prescribing and how that compares to a colleague across town. They know whether patients are filling their prescriptions — and refilling them on time. They know details of patients’ medical conditions and lab tests, and sometimes even their age, income and ethnic backgrounds.

The result, said one marketing consultant, is what would happen if Arthur Miller’s Willy Loman met up with the data whizzes of Michael Lewis’s “Moneyball.” “There’s a group of geeks, if you will, who are running the numbers and helping the sales guys be much more efficient,” said Chris Wright, managing director of ZS Associates, which conducts such analyses for pharmaceutical companies.

 

Drug makers say they are putting the information to good use, by helping a doctor improve the chances that their patients take their medications as prescribed, or making sure they are prescribing the right drug to the right patients.

 

Some doctors, however, expressed discomfort with the idea of sensitive data being used to sell drugs, even though federal law requires that any personally identifiable information be removed. “I think the doctors tend not to be aware of the depths to which they are being analyzed and studied by people trying to sell them drugs and other medical products,” said Dr. Jerry Avorn, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a pioneer of programs for doctors aimed at counteracting the marketing efforts of drug makers. “Almost by definition, a lot of this stuff happens under the radar — there may be a sales pitch, but the doctor may not know that sales pitch is being informed by their own prescribing patterns.”

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What is a Digital Workplace and Why Should You Care?

What is a Digital Workplace and Why Should You Care? | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Digital Workplaces aren’t yet taking the world by storm but they are emerging as a very powerful enabling technology for the future. Moreover, they will probably be seen as a critical need as the world becomes more mobile and businesses begin to rely more heavily on social networking.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
luiy's insight:

In Paul Miller‘s excellent book, The Digital Workplace, he defines the digital workplace as, “the technology-enabled space where work happens.”  He further states that, “it involves all the tools we use to do our jobs:  email, phone, text, intranet, micro-blogging, Internet, office documents, shared documents, teleconferences, video, software packages, smart phones, tablets, and the cloud.”

 

The Digital Workplace is about an overall philosophy and approach for managing a very flexible and free organization.  He is referring to the digital workplace as the entire underlying technical infrastructure that allows such an organization to exist.  It is a very broad usage that includes all of the technical capabilities that power a modern business organization and really focuses on a management philosophy rather than on how to use a specific system to implement that philosophy.

 

Mark Morrell, a noted internet blogger, defines the digital workplace even more generally as, “Work is what you do, not where you go to.”  Again, this definition focuses on an overall philosophy for how we approach work.

For the purposes of this blog series I’m going to focus much more specifically on a digital workplace as a collection of tools and capabilities that allow team members to work much more effectively together, especially in an environment where the participants may be physically separated from their offices, and from each other, by hundreds or thousands of miles.

 

For the purposes of this blog entry, a digital workplace is an integrated collection of tools and capabilities that allow team members to connect, communicate, collaborate, and conduct all of their required work activities wherever and whenever they may be working.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 20, 2013 10:05 AM

The closing line makes the point a digital world will play a role. It won't play the only role. What we need to develop is effective and mindful practices to integrate digital technologies into the workplace and our world.

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The Internet of Things: In action

The Internet of Things: In action | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
By 2015, six billion objects in the world will be connected to the internet. While it may seem tricky to grasp as a concept, the internet of things is nothing simpler, and more stunning, ...
luiy's insight:
Communicate with objects

The internet of things relies on information travelling from one point to another, and it’s easiest to see the potential for this when you consider the impact of information flowing from YOU to an object.

Nest  is a great example of this. A thermostat that you can actually communicate with, saving money and energy on heating in the home. Instead of just setting your thermostat at the start of winter and probably never touching it again, now you can text your thermostat with Nest, for example telling it if you’re going to be out for the evening unexpectedly, so there’s no need to turn the heating on. 

 

Objects communicating with each other

What we’re starting to see emerge is that instead of one object connected to an owner, or a single trigger, objects are connecting with each other to allow a new type of communication. An innovative product on the market in this area is the Good Night Lamp. A network of objects consists of a ‘master’ lamp connected to mini lamps, so that when the master lamp turned on, all or some of the other lamps light up. 

 

Internet of Things in the body

As well as seeing advances in the internet of things around us, we’re seeing connected objects move onto us and even into us. Nike is one of the most high-profile brands experimenting with the internet of things, seen first with their launch of the Fuelband, which tracks you as you go without you having to do anything. Simply slip it on your wrist and access a whole load of information based on your movements. And now they’re about to launch Fuelband 2, which will integrate Bluetooth 4.0. This will enable the Fuelband to improve their API, to allow apps and games to access data and use accordingly. It will also feature a heart rate monitor, because why not??

This is where the internet of things perhaps gets its most exciting. Your body is now an API and you can gather and transmit data that can be used for fun in the form of exercise, but also to help improve our health. The internet of things in the body enables data to be transmitted to other services. And with any development in wearable technology we need to look beyond the immediate, basic use – i.e. a bracelet that tells you how many steps you took that day, and into what we can do with that data that’s being gathered. So why not have a heart monitor that could automatically put a call through to emergency services if your heart rate reaches critical levels.

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Why Managers Haven't Embraced Complexity

Why Managers Haven't Embraced Complexity | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Nobody would deny that the world has become more complex during the past decades. With digitization, the interconnectivity between people and things has jumped by leaps and bounds. Dense networks now define the technical, social, and economic landscape. I remember well when the idea of applying complexity science to management was first being eagerly discussed in the 1990s. By then, for example, scholars at the University of St. Gallen had developed a management model based on systems thinking. Popular literature propagated the ideas of complexity theory — in particular, the notion of the "butterfly effect" by which a small event in a remote part of the world (like the flap of a butterfly's wings) could trigger a chain of events that would add up to a disruptive change in the larger system (such as a hurricane). Managers' eyes were opened to the reality that organizations are not just complicated but complex. Why did this interest and work in complexity not lead to major changes in management practices? There are, I think, a few major reasons that it didn't — and that also suggest that the overdue change might now finally take place.
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Visual Business Intelligence - From Giant Hairballs to Clear Patterns in Networks. #SNA

Visual Business Intelligence - From Giant Hairballs to Clear Patterns in Networks. #SNA | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via ukituki
luiy's insight:

The usefulness of understanding relationships within networks is becoming more apparent, so it is fortunate that our ability to explore and analyze networks by visualizing them is improving. Common examples of networks that analysts examine include connections between terrorists or connections between linked sites on the World Wide Web. While these networks in particular get a great deal of attention today, other more run-of-the-mill networks can be explored more insightfully as well, such as the connections between products that are often purchased together, which we’ve pursued as market-basket analysis for ages. The most common and typically most useful form of network visualization consists of nodes (things, such as people or products) and links (connections between things), displayed as a diagram in various arrangements. When networks are large, consisting of thousands or millions of nodes, node-link diagrams can become so overwhelmingly cluttered, they’re sometimes called “giant hairballs.” Consequently, those who study information visualization have been trying to develop ways to simplify and clarify these diagrams. A new approach described in a paper titled

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Measuring the Topical Specificity of Online Communities. #analytics #SNA

Presentation from the Extended Semantic Web Conference 2013
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The Seas of Plastic Interactive - by dumpark. #dataviz #infoviz

The Seas of Plastic Interactive - by dumpark. #dataviz #infoviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Interactive Infographic - Plastic pollution in the oceans represents a major global environmental challenge. At a global scale, man-made debris has been observed to accumulate in remote areas of the ocean in large circulating gyres.
luiy's insight:

Accumulation of marine floating debris originated from highly populated coastal regions

 

Plastic pollution in the oceans represents a major global environmental challenge. At a global scale, man-made debris has been observed to accumulate in remote areas of the ocean in large circulating gyres. The source of this plastic is assumed to be mostly land based, however little is known about the relative contribution of different land based sources to each gyre.

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How Health Care Is Mining, Using Your Data. #health

How Health Care Is Mining, Using Your Data. #health | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Did you know there’s new information collected about you, every time you go to the doctor? But what happens to that data after you leave?
luiy's insight:

Did you know there’s new information collected about you, every time you go to the doctor? But what happens to that data after you leave? Roughly 80 percent of collected health data is stored in hundreds of different forms such as lab results, images and medical transcripts, making it virtually useless.

 

That’s why health-care organizations are leveraging big data technology to capture patient information. The idea is to improve health care through care coordination, population health management and patient engagement and outreach.

 

Marty Kohn, chief medical scientist for IBM Research and a former ER doctor said, “The U.S. lags most other countries in health care. Our health-care system needs a transformation to compare to those around the world. We need to make it more personalized to make it more efficient and safer.”

Kohn offered three examples of how big data is already transforming patient health care at various organizations.

 

Data-driven decisions: This is when new evidence, or secondary evidence, is drawn from existing data. Big data can search for patient similarities through thousands of characteristics to help diagnose a problem.

 

Stream computing: In stream computing, data is not collected and stored. It’s used “near real-time,” or the time minus minimal processing delays.

 

At The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, for example, every baby in the neo-natal ICU has vitals monitored and can predict an upcoming problem before it happens. Hospital staff will be alerted to a life-threatening infection up to 24 hours earlier than current practices.

 

Patient Care and Insight: This third use involves predictive data analysis for high-risk patients.

 

Kohn said using the information around us will help doctors make better decisions. Technology enables doctors and health-care providers to create better health-care patterns for the future, he said.

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BECOMING A TWEEP. How prior online experiences influence Twitter use. #dataviz #bigdata

BECOMING A TWEEP. How prior online experiences influence Twitter use. #dataviz #bigdata | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
(2012). BECOMING A TWEEP. Information, Communication & Society: Vol. 15, A decade in Internet time: the dynamics of the Internet and society, pp. 680-702. doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2012.666256
luiy's insight:

Consistent with what the diffusion of innovations literature would predict (Kwon & Zmud 1987; Rogers 1995; Koivumäki et al.2008), our results suggest that individuals who were already using similar services (such as other SNSs) and engaging in behaviours common on Twitter in 2009 (such as posting status updates) were more likely to be using Twitter the following year. These results are similar to the findings of a national survey using cross-sectional data that found that those who regularly used other SNSs were more likely to engage in status updating and to use Twitter than those who did not use SNSs as often (Webster 2011). Similarly, we also found evidence that one's prior online consumption and production activities play a role in Twitter adoption. While prior research has already shown that a person's topical interests play a significant role in becoming a Twitter user (Hargittai & Litt 2011), our results further this finding by demonstrating that the specific types of online content that one has experience consuming and producing at earlier times impact service adoption as well. On the aggregate level, those who engaged with topics on the Internet that are also popular on Twitter as identified by prior literature (Cheong 2009; Marwick 2010), such as entertainment and celebrity news and sports, were more likely to use the service a year later than those not engaging in such activities. These findings suggest that people who are already looking for and discussing online content related to topics popular on Twitter are more likely to begin using the service. While we did not directly test one's perceptions of Twitter's usefulness, the Technology Acceptance Model suggests that if people believe a technology will be beneficial, they are more likely to use it (Davis1989). It may be then that people adopted Twitter because they knew that it would be an appropriate source for the content they were already seeking and sharing. We found that certain types of content production and consumption seem to influence Twitter adoption more than others. When controlling for one's background characteristics, online skill and cell phone experiences, results imply that participants who engaged with entertainment-focused topics, such as movies or TV shows, were more likely to use Twitter than those who did not. Research by Marwick and boyd (2011) suggests that Twitter may be especially relevant to people interested in content of this nature because of the ‘perception of direct access to a famous person’ (p. 6). Our findings seem to support this claim. In contrast, other popular topics on Twitter do not seem to influence Twitter adoption from either a production or a consumption perspective. While politicians and news outlets are prevalent on Twitter (Kim et al. 2010; Marwick 2010), neither an interest in politics and/or news as found by earlier work (Hargittai & Litt 2011) nor the consumption or production of such material relates to the adoption of Twitter among a group of young adults. This may be due to the specific age range of study participants. Were we to have data on people representing a wider age range, we may have found different results about how engagement with news and political topics relates to Twitter use. Our research also contributes to the growing body of literature on the digital savvy of young Internet users (Bennett et al. 2008; Zimic 2009; Gui & Argentin 2011). Even among this diverse group of young adults, a variation in digital media experiences and Internet skill exists, which, in turn, appears to impact Twitter adoption. One significant predictor of uptake in all our models is Internet skill. Those with higher online skills are more likely to adopt Twitter. While mainstream media highlight the digital prowess of the younger generation (e.g. Henley 2010), our findings do not support assumptions about a universally Net-savvy generation (Prensky 2001).

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danah boyd | Social Steganography: Learning to Hide in Plain Sight

danah boyd |  Social Steganography: Learning to Hide in Plain Sight | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
@Documentally  » Social Steganography: Learning to Hide in Plain Sight - http://t.co/fhlTgeFVMO
luiy's insight:

Privacy in a public age


Carmen is engaging in social steganography. She’s hiding information in plain sight, creating a message that can be read in one way by those who aren’t in the know and read differently by those who are. She’s communicating to different audiences simultaneously, relying on specific cultural awareness to provide the right interpretive lens. While she’s focused primarily on separating her mother from her friends, her message is also meaningless to broader audiences who have no idea that she had just broken up with her boyfriend. As far as they’re concerned, Carmen just posted an interesting lyric.

 

Social steganography is one privacy tactic teens take when engaging in semi-public forums like Facebook. While adults have worked diligently to exclude people through privacy settings, many teenagers have been unable to exclude certain classes of adults – namely their parents – for quite some time. For this reason, they’ve had to develop new techniques to speak to their friends fully aware that their parents are overhearing. Social steganography is one of the most common techniques that teens employ. They do this because they care about privacy, they care about misinterpretation, they care about segmented communications strategies. And they know that technical tools for restricting access don’t trump parental demands to gain access. So they find new ways of getting around limitations. And, in doing so, reconstruct age-old practices.

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About | WE THE DATA. #dataawareness #privacy #wethedata

About | WE THE DATA. #dataawareness #privacy #wethedata | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
WE ARE DATA. The Arab Spring and Zipcar are part of the same data revolution. 
luiy's insight:

WE ARE DATA. The Arab Spring and Zipcar are part of the same data revolution. How? Right now, data may be what we intentionally share, or what is gathered about us – the product of surveillance and tracking. We are the customer, but our data are the product. How do we balance our anxiety around data with its incredible potential? How do we regain more control over what happens to our data and what is targeted at us as a result? We The Data have the power to topple dictators, or empower them. We The Data can broaden economic opportunity to new, as yet unimagined kinds of entrepreneurs, or further consolidate economic power in the hands of a few large corporations. We The Data can create new forms of social cooperation and exchange, or give us more of the same corporate obsession with better targeted advertising.  It’s up to us: #wethedata

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Data Visualization for Tablets and Touch Screens. #dataviz

Data Visualization for Tablets and Touch Screens. #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
At the end of 2012, comScore estimated there were 52.4 million tablet owners in the U.S.; Apple sold another 19.5 million iPads in the first three months of
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At the end of 2012, comScore estimated there were 52.4 million tablet owners in the U.S.; Applesold another 19.5 million iPads in the first three months of 2013 alone. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that some companies, such as Roambi, Tableau, and Bloomberg are starting to offer mobile, touch-aware data visualization apps.

 

But dropping your desktop user interface onto a tablet doesn’t really take the best advantage of all of those touches and gestures now, does it?

 

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here are plenty of open design questions to work out for touchable data visualization: How to make intuitive gestures that are easy to discover and remember, whether touch may have advantages in data storytelling interfaces, and how to blend gestures into more traditional UI designs, among others. And deep research questions are also waiting to be resolved. Petra Isenberg, a researcher at INRIA in France, published a paper on data visualization on interactive surfaces that stipulates some key questions: “[We] don’t fully understand how touching virtual data affects comprehension or memorability of information,” she writes.

So whether you’re a practitioner or a researcher, there is a lot to work on here. Not only will tablet usage continue to grow, but other opportunities for museum installations, kiosks, and large-format presentation systems offer plenty of use-contexts to explore data visualization that takes advantage of the full interaction bandwidth afforded by these new displays and devices

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Social Network Analysis in R. #SNA #methods

Social Network Analysis in R. #SNA #methods | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
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Chapters

1. “Introductory Lab.” Nowak, Michael and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010.

2. “Methodological Beginnings – Basic Triadic and Cohesion Measures.” Nowak, Michael and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010. 

3. “Clusters, Factions and Cores.” Nowak, Michael and Daniel A. McFarland. 

4. “Centralities and Their Interrelation.” Sukumaran, Abhay,Michael Nowak and Daniel A. McFarland.

5. "Affiliation Data and Network Mobility." Messing, Solomon and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010. 

6. "Structural Equivalences and Block-Modeling." Nowak, Michael, Solomon Messing, Sean J. Westwood and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010. 

7. “Peer Influence and QAP Regression." Messing, Solomon, Sean J. Westwood and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010.

8. "Exponential-Family Random Graph Models.” Westwood, Sean J. and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010.

9. "Converting igraph to SoNIA with R." Westwood, Sean J. and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010.

10. "rSoNIA and Visualizing Social Network Dynamics." Bender-deMoll, Skye and Daniel A. McFarland. 2010.

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De la cosmologie à l’intelligence artificielle #entropie #cybernetics

L’intelligence artificielle (IA) avance en général à coup de progrès locaux : on apprend à une machine à se déplacer, à jouer à Jeopardy, à repérer les occurrences d’un texte ou à reconnaître les visages. Mais jusqu’ici, l’idée d’une théorie générale de l’intelligence susceptible de prendre en compte l’ensemble des phénomènes mentaux nous a toujours échappé. Depuis quelques semaines circule cependant parmi les aficionados un nouveau mot qui sonne comme une promesse : “Entropica”.


Via Lockall
luiy's insight:

L’intelligence artificielle (IA) avance en général à coup de progrès locaux : on apprend à une machine à se déplacer, à jouer à Jeopardy, à repérer les occurrences d’un texte ou à reconnaître les visages. Mais jusqu’ici, l’idée d’une théorie générale de l’intelligence susceptible de prendre en compte l’ensemble des phénomènes mentaux nous a toujours échappé. Depuis quelques semaines circule cependant parmi les aficionados un nouveau mot qui sonne comme une promesse : “Entropica”.

 

A l’origine une théorie d’Alexander Wissner-Gross qui a publié avec son équipe un papier (.pdf) dans la Physical Review (si vous avez des compétences mathématiques, consultez-le, je n’y ai personnellement rien compris) qui cherche à établir une relation entre les principes cosmologiques et l’intelligence.

 

La principale brique de la thèse de l’auteur est la relation existante entre l’entropie et l’information. La thèse de l’entropie, issue de la thermodynamique, est qu’un système tend vers une augmentation du désordre. Par exemple, si l’on mêle de l’eau chaude et l’eau froide dans une baignoire, la température tend à se stabiliser vers le “tiède”. Un côté de la baignoire ne restera pas chaud et l’autre froid. L’un de principes de la thermodynamique est que tout incline vers l’entropie.

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Using ICT tools to cut carbon emissions and improve agriculture. #R4D #development

Using ICT tools to cut carbon emissions and improve agriculture. #R4D #development | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Information and communication technologies for climate change and agriculture are developing fast. Josh Woodard explains how they fit into the big picture
luiy's insight:

Certainly, not all services (ICT) are created equally, and the depth of research on impact is still fairly shallow, but the research to date has been promising. This is particularly the case when we look at the rate of adoption of new practices. To be sure, not all the agricultural content providers are promoting environmentally sustainable farming methods. But the fact that these technologies are leading to changes in agricultural practice over control groups without access to these services is telling.

 

Here's a selection of some of what we do know: research by the Grameen Foundation on its Community Knowledge Worker programmein Uganda, which shares agricultural content via mobile phone, found a significant and positive impact in the use of organic manure within communities with access to the scheme; while research by Farm Radio International found that having a radio station call out to farmers can increase adoption rates by up to 14%; and a pilot study on the impact of low-cost video on agricultural practices in India found video to be up to10 times more cost effective on a cost per adoption basis than traditional extension methods alone (although more recent analysis by Digital Green is showing slightly lower, but still significant impact).

 

The potential impact of ICT on its own is not enough to overcome the global climate and food security challenges over the coming decades. It is important to remember that while the technologies can support the transition to more sustainable agricultural practices, they still require someone to create high quality and relevant content, and someone to pay for the dissemination of that information. Compared with the state of agricultural extension in much of the world prior to the ready availability of these technologies, however, there is cause for optimism that just astechnology has enabled the rapid spread of entertainment, it may also facilitate a faster transition to environmentally friendlier forms of agriculture in the places that need them most. And while that alone won't solve the problem, it is certainly a helpful start.

 

• To learn more about how ICT is being used well in agriculture, visit the FAO E-Agriculture community, The World Bank's ICT in agriculture site,GSMA's magri page, and the many USaid topical briefing papers andtoolkits on interactive radio and low-cost video.

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Six Numbers Reveal the Booming Business of Auto-Analytics

Six Numbers Reveal the Booming Business of Auto-Analytics | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
For millennia people have run by feel, an "art of combining our breath and mind and muscles into fluid self-propulsion over wild terrain," says Christopher McDougall in his anthropological study of the topic. Many of us still run this way, of course, but for how much longer? Now we can lace up a pair of "smart" sneakers and instantly shift from running by feel to running by metrics. Guesses at how far and how fast are replaced by real time stats on pace and meters travelled. If you think you'll never make the switch, think again. As Nike learned from studying millions of users, the magic number of times a runner needs to see her data before becoming a more "science-based" runner is just five. Once a person crosses that threshold they are "massively more likely" to keep running by metrics than by feel alone. That's a great number. Here are five more I've come across in my ongoing study of the field of auto-analytics. Auto analytics have a long tradition in the U.S. Benjamin Franklin was an early adopter, though his self-tracking experiments grabbed fewer headlines than his apocryphal kite-flying ones. Franklin quantified his progress toward achieving 13 personal goals, assigning himself a "little black spot" on days he failed to make progress on a particular goal.
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