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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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Watch as 1000 years of European borders change (timelapse map) | #history

Watch as 1000 years of European borders change (timelapse map) An incredible timelapse look at how drastically European borders have changed over the last 1000 years TransferWise…
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The Story of Humanity with Game Based #Learning | #dataviz #DH

The Story of Humanity with Game Based #Learning | #dataviz #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Master 8 Periods of History with The Big History Project What do you get when you cross a maveric...

Via Chris Carter, Rui Guimarães Lima
luiy's insight:

The public course takes about 8 hours to finish and divides history into 8 “thresholds,” periods in which critical events happened to alter the course of all history.  Each threshold module contains multimedia elements to fully explore the time period from a variety of disciplines, especially science.  The public user has the option of taking quizzes and earning badges for each module passed.  At the end of the course, the user can earn the title of Certified Big Historian.  (The first 10,000 users to do so get a free sticker.)

 

By combining gamification elements with fascinating (sometimes mind-blowing) content, BHP manages to achieve something a lot of history teachers never could–it makes history fun.  The videos are engaging, with excellent graphics and music.  The material is presented with a minimum of jargon and the site is easy to navigate.  And while we won’t say the quizzes are easy, the user does have a chance to retake them until they reach a high enough score for the badge.  (Don’t ask us how many tries it took to score 100% on the Big Bang badge….)

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 12, 2014 7:30 PM

13.7 billion years ... wow!

Chris Carter's comment, January 18, 2014 3:24 AM
Rui Guimarães Lima, you are heartily welcome! My friend and colleague teaches Big History here in Shanghai. We are the first non-US overseas school to do so. Exciting!
Rescooped by luiy from Humanities and their Algorithmic Revolution
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A Brief History of the #Hashtag, and Other Unusual Punctuation Marks

A Brief History of the #Hashtag, and Other Unusual Punctuation Marks | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The stories behind the octothorpe, the pilcrow, the ampersand, the manicule, and the diple.

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

The story of the hashtag begins sometime around the fourteenth century, with the introduction of the Latin abbreviation “lb,” for the Roman term libra pondo, or “pound weight.” Like many standard abbreviations of that period, “lb” was written with the addition of a horizontal bar, known as a tittle, or tilde (an example is shown above, right, in Johann Conrad Barchusen’s “Pyrosophia,” from 1698). And though printers commonly cast this barred abbreviation as a single character, it was the rushed pens of scribes that eventually produced the symbol’s modern form: hurriedly dashed off again and again, the barred “lb” mutated into the abstract #. The symbol shown here on the left, a barred “lb” rendered in Isaac Newton’s elegant scrawl, is a missing link, a now-extinct ancestor of the # that bridges the gap between the symbol’s Latin origins and its familiar modern form. Though it is now referred to by a number of different names—“hash mark,” “number sign,” and even “octothorpe,” a jokey appellation coined by engineers working on the Touch-Tone telephone keypad—the phrase “pound sign” can be traced to the symbol’s ancient origins. For just as “lb” came from libra, so the word “pound” is descended from pondo, making the # a descendent of the Roman term libra pondo in both name and appearance.

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Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted--geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?

That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding...


Via Lauren Moss
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The evolution of the web | #cyberculture #history #dataviz

The evolution of the web | #cyberculture #history #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Interactive infographic about the evolution of browsers and the web.

 

Google launches this year's version of the Evolution of the Web with Hyperakt and Vizzuality.

 

http://hyperakt.com/work-detail/314

http://vizzuality.com/projects/evolutionofweb20

 

Last year, Vizzuality, Hyperakt, and members of the Google Chrome team worked on a visualization of web technologies and browsers. Since it was warmly received by the community, we decided to make a new version, using some of the latest web technologies to provide a fresh and distinctive experience.

 

In addition to updating the visualization with new browser versions and web technologies, we built a secondary visualization to show the growth of internet users and internet traffic worldwide.

 

 


Via blogbrevity
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Spy Toolkit: The Coolest Espionage Gadgets Throughout #History | #surveillance

Spy Toolkit: The Coolest Espionage Gadgets Throughout #History | #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Spy gadgetry is constantly evolving, but history is chock-full of sweet espionage gizmos.
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Why Infographics are a Great Way to Show the History of the World I #dataviz #DH

Why Infographics are a Great Way to Show the History of the World I #dataviz #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The Infographic History of the World is a new book that continues to push the field of infographics forward. With beautiful printing and meaningful graphics,
luiy's insight:

Being a designer, I usually find it easier to present stories or ideas with scribbles, rather than simply trying to explain them with words. Often, complex stories are more easily communicated, understood and, ultimately, remembered, when they take visual form.

 

Aside from data and words, infographics use images and graphical representations. Those key elements – images, words and numbers – operate as a system for simplifying information, revealing new patterns, and producing new knowledge in various fields. In fact, they might not have always been called “infographics,” but info/data-based visualizations have always been around.

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Rescooped by luiy from History 2[+or less 3].0
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Digital mapping at Stanford reveals social networks of 18th-century travelers

Digital mapping at Stanford reveals social networks of 18th-century travelers | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Through a digital analysis of correspondence from elite tourists in Europe, classicist Giovanna Ceserani is discovering how international travel fostered cultural and academic trends.

Via Pierre Levy, juandoming, Rui Guimarães Lima
luiy's insight:

We live in a world of networks, of nonstop messaging and degrees of separation. So did intellectuals of the early modern age, according to new research at Stanford.

 

During the 18th century, thousands of letters, often on academic subjects like mathematics, were exchanged between scholars across Europe. Wealthy aristocrats and their tutors penned many of those letters when they were on the famed "Grand Tour" of ancient sites in Europe.

 

A pioneering digital visualization project has allowedGiovanna Ceserani, an associate professor of classics, to map the routes of thousands of British and Irish elite travelers who went to Italy in the heyday of the Grand Tour.

Ceserani's digital humanities project, the Grand Tour Travelers, has uncovered unexpectedly close connections between intellectuals, illuminated the rise and fall of cities, and occasionally offered warnings about how visualization can sometimes prove misleading.

Analysis of digital interpretations of the records of over 6,000 travelers from the British Isles illustrate just how small the elite world of tourists in this period was, as well as how, "irrespective of profession and social status, travel abroad seems to have lowered social boundaries and enabled otherwise unlikely connections,"

 

Ceserani said.

The project began with the encoding of a digitized version of the Dictionary of British and Irish Travelers to Italy, 1701-1800, generously supplied by the Paul Mellon Centre in London. For each traveler, Ceserani and her team recorded the sites they visited, the dates of their visits and their birthplace and year, as well as their area of expertise, educational background and social status, among other variables.

 

A scholar with an interest in how classical sites in Italy influenced broader European culture, Ceserani wanted to trace "the actual movements of scholars, of travelers," as they undertook journeys across Europe, often coming into contact with other travelers as they did so.

 

Digital humanities experts within the Mapping the Republic of Letters project, of which Ceserani is a core member, helped Ceserani build the platforms "to place these objects and events onto maps and graphs, visualizing in revealing ways our material."

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Rui Guimarães Lima's curator insight, April 12, 2013 12:07 PM

Afinal ainda faltava mais esta... Bom  fim-de-semana!

Luc Gauvreau's comment, April 12, 2013 2:04 PM
Dommage... Il semble que le site, les données, le module de visualisation de ce projet sont dans un site réservé. Le mouvement de l'open access est conçu et pratiqué différemment, parfois même au sein de la même institution...
Pierre Levy's comment, April 12, 2013 5:50 PM
@luc Gauvreau : Hélas!
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The #History Of The Top 6 Social Networks Of All Time | #cyberculture #dataviz

The #History Of The Top 6 Social Networks Of All Time | #cyberculture #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

What did the biggest social networks look like when they first started and what does the future hold for Facebook?


Via Andrea Zeitz
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