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Les personnes handicapées vont pouvoir remplacer leur main perdue grâce à cette prothèse au prix très abordable

Les personnes handicapées vont pouvoir remplacer leur main perdue grâce à cette prothèse au prix très abordable | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Une jeune entreprise italienne a développé une prothèse de main à bas coût en utilisant l'impression 3D. Son but étant qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes amputées puissent profiter d'un produit fini plus facilement.

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eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant
Digital, Apps, IoT, devices, AI / DL (...) innovations for Health and Healthcare
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New AI system can screen for neurological illnesses in seconds

New AI system can screen for neurological illnesses in seconds | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence method that can identify a range of acute neurological illnesses in CT scans within a few seconds, when time is essential in assessing the life-threatening conditions.

Conditions such as stroke, hemorrhage and hydrocephalus were identified much faster with deep learning than through human diagnosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine.

"With a total processing and interpretation time of 1.2 seconds, such a triage system can alert physicians to a critical finding that may otherwise remain in a queue for minutes to hours," senior author Dr. Eric Oermann, an instructor in the Department of Neurosurgery at Mount Sinai, said in a press release. "We're executing on the vision to develop artificial intelligence in medicine that will solve clinical problems and improve patient care."

The Mount Sinai AI Consortium, known as "AISINAI," first developed first AI method to assess the neurological illnesses. The consortium is a group of scientists, physicians and researchers dedicated to developing artificial intelligence for practical uses in medicine.
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How to reduce time to market for medical devices

How to reduce time to market for medical devices | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
According to market research firm Evaluate, the medical device and technology (medtech) market will be worth $500 billion by 2021, and the need for affordable and safe medical devices only continues to increase. This need is primarily driven due to population growth – the growth rate is 1% (approximate 60 million people) currently, and our global population increased from 1.5 to 6.1 billion between 1900 and 2000 alone. Another factor is the rise of new and developing diseases which require aggressive monitoring and treatment methods.

Given these realities, in addition to the rise in industry-wide adoption of present-day, high-tech developments like connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices and artificial intelligence (AI) software, the global medtech market should experience explosive growth – yet this is not the case. Although Evaluate predicts a 5% annual growth rate for the years ahead, many major players in this space had negative growth for the years previously. So what is the cause of this lack of industry growth and advancement and what role can we play to help solve it?


What is the problem?

The continued innovation and development of medical devices and accompanying technologies takes a significant amount of time, money, and resources. Additionally, these projects require various internal and external teams within software engineering, hardware engineering, product management, regulatory affairs, quality, marketing and other fields to work together simultaneously – which is not an easy task.

According to ScienceDirect, a platform for peer-reviewed scholarly literature covering healthcare and other science-related industries, the average time-to-market for a medical device falls between three to seven years; moreover, per a Stanford University study, the average cost of bringing an FDA-approved medical product from inception to release was $31 million. For high-risk medical products, the cost would run over $90 million.

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Merck, Geisinger gear up to market their own EHR drug-tracking apps

Merck, Geisinger gear up to market their own EHR drug-tracking apps | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Merck & Co. and Geisinger developed two EHR-friendly programs to boost medication adherence, reduce drug errors and help patients and providers connect on their care—and now they're taking those apps to market.

The partners are in talks with several health IT companies about rolling out the two programs, Strategic Program Director Julie Rockey told FierceMedTech. “We’re taking what we’ve built at Geisinger over the last several years and looking to make it available to the broader marketplace,” said Rockey, who helps lead the collaboration.

The apps, MedTrue and the Family Caregiver Application, are the fruit of a six-year partnership between the Big Pharma and the hospital system. MedTrue integrates medication data from several sources, including prescription fill data, to provide a verified list of medications for each patient.

"We know from prior work that about 70% of our medication lists are inaccurate, and these inaccuracies can lead to medical errors," Mike Evans, Geisinger’s VP of enterprise pharmacy and chief pharmacy officer, said in a statement. "The MedTrue application provides an interface that seeks to clean up medication lists, so patients and providers can be on the same page regarding medication use and better care decisions can be made."

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Social POV: Instagram for Patient Engagement

Social POV: Instagram for Patient Engagement | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

When it comes to brand engagement, Instagram outperforms every other social media platform. And yet, life sciences companies are hesitant to use the image-focused app. It turns out they may be missing an opportunity because Instagram is another way to build trust with consumers and improve brand recognition. Through the proper use of Instagram for patient engagement, pharma can realize many benefits.


Visual content is the essence of Instagram

Think of Instagram as somewhere between Facebook and Twitter. Images are the core element, but captions can be any desired length. Users can interact with photos through likes and comments. They can also send private messages. A user can follow other users, as well as specific hashtags such as #digitalhealth, #chronicpain and #cardio. There’s also a robust search tool to find content.

Unlike Facebook and Twitter, Instagram is perfect for storytelling. As Internet entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk explains, the platform is less cluttered, which helps to hold users’ attention: “When you’re spending time on Instagram, you’re not paying attention to anything else. 100% engaged and looking at your Instagram screen, each photo of users you follow on Instagram passes one by one. IG is all about that attention.”

A relatively new feature is Instagram Stories which was rolled out to compete with platforms like Snapchat. Stories can be pictures or videos, and users can add text or stickers. It features tools for drawing, augmented reality, and polling. Comments aren’t allowed, but users can send a direct message to the creator.

Instagram Stories can be saved for later viewing, but they disappear by default after 24 hours. Instagram says more than 300 million accounts use the Stories feature daily. This offers companies fertile ground for testing new concepts or engagement strategies. Another option available on Instagram is live video.

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Eight Companies Making Health Data More Secure

Eight Companies Making Health Data More Secure | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
his year has been full of headlines about healthcare data security breaches, from ransomware attacks to phishing scams. Health data is valuable on the black market, and hackers continue to get more creative in how they pursue it.

With the importance of open, shareable health data only growing, innovative health companies need to develop future-forward strategies to protect this data at all costs. Here are eight StartUp Health portfolio companies — from Pakistan to Brazil to across the USA — doing just that.


Azaad Health

Syed Abrar Ahmed, founder of Azaad Health, is on a mission to expand the reach of medical records. Their platform is a secure blockchain-powered data exchange network that congregates medical records from various providers and critical information from wearable devices and applications. The data can then be shared with insurance providers, researchers, doctors and family. Azaad Health additionally has a emergency situation feature that allows doctors to access patient records via QR code scanning. The company launched their beta in May 2017 with 150 users, and has recently partnered with Pakistan Software House Association.

Electronic Health Network

Charles Williams and Aadli Abdul-Kareem, co-founders of Electronic Health Network, are eliminating the barriers of data access to help clinicians focus on care rather than data access. Their medical interoperability network (MiNT) delivers data and records to physicians, nurses and payers and allows for secure sharing of health information. With MiNT, the community can continuously access refreshed, real-time data through their master patient index view. In a study with Prince George County, they reduced readmission by 44%, hospital visits by 42% and costs by 35%.

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Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft and others make health data pledge

Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft and others make health data pledge | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
There are many broken things about the U.S. health care system. But one of the biggest and most overlooked problems is that patients still find it too hard to share their medical information between doctors, especially those working in different hospitals.

It's a huge problem for many reasons: It makes it harder for consumers to access the highest-quality care, and new patients who walk into a hospital are like strangers — care-givers won't know if they have an allergy or a chronic disease.

Some of the largest technology companies in the world are undertaking a new effort to fix that. And they have a good reason to do it, as the lack of open standards around health data is a huge barrier for them to get into the $3 trillion health system.

On Monday, Alphabet, Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and Salesforce spoke out at an event in Washington D.C. called the Blue Button 2.0 Developer conference. These companies are rivals in some important ways, so it's a strong signal that they came together on this issue.

Here's the joint statement:

We are jointly committed to removing barriers for the adoption of technologies for healthcare interoperability, particularly those that are enabled through the cloud and AI. We share the common quest to unlock the potential in healthcare data, to deliver better outcomes at lower costs.
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Une intelligence artificielle pour rendre le traitement contre le cancer moins toxique

Une intelligence artificielle pour rendre le traitement contre le cancer moins toxique | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Le cancer est souvent une maladie très agressive et son traitement très lourd pour le patient. Des chercheurs travaillent à rendre ce dernier plus supportable.

Le glioblastome est la forme la plus agressive de cancer du cerveau, avec un pronostic ne dépassant jamais les cinq ans chez l’adulte. Son traitement est malheureusement lui aussi très agressif, les médecins administrant le plus souvent les doses de médicaments maximales – en restant dans les limites autorisées, évidemment – pour tenter de faire diminuer la tumeur le plus possible. Et comme vous pouvez l’imaginer, cela entraîne des effets secondaires très graves.


Une intelligence artificielle pour optimiser le traitement des glioblastomes

Des chercheurs du MIT Media Lab proposent aujourd’hui l’utilisation d’une intelligence artificielle pour rendre l’administration de médicaments moins toxique. L’idée est d’utiliser un modèle de self-learning dans lequel l’IA étudie des traitements déjà en place pour ajuster les dosages jusqu’à trouver la configuration optimale.

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Artificial Intelligence in healthcare – what does the NHS workforce think?

Artificial Intelligence in healthcare – what does the NHS workforce think? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

A new survey of NHS staff reveals that while there remains a difference between the level of enthusiasm for AI between senior managers and other respondents of the survey, overall the majority view it as positive.

Digital transformation has been the recent focal point in the discussion surrounding healthcare, and with AI at the forefront, continuously popping up as an example of ways the NHS could achieve its aims stated in the Five Year Forward View.

The tech focused Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, announced an investment of £400 million in tech transformation and supported AI as providing “huge opportunities to improve patient outcomes and to make life easier for staff.” The Prime Minister herself has even spoken at length about AIs potential improve health provision in the UK.

However, AI not only provides opportunities to the NHS, it is also draws our attention to the areas where the NHS needs improving. The House of Lords Select Committee report ‘AI in the UK: Ready, willing and able?’ showed that obtaining applicable data from other organisations remains the most significant barrier to adoption of AI and could force the implantation to stand still whilst other changes are made.

This leave us with one question, what does the NHS workforce think?

While the adoption of AI in aiding the NHS to deliver healthcare is a priority of the Department and its Secretary, a survey by Dods Research reveals the NHS workers attitudes to AI and how organisations use it.

The survey had 1,019 respondents including 700 individuals working for NHS Trusts, 47 for clinical commissioning groups, and 31 from NHS England. In terms of roles, approaching 200 respondents were senior managers, heads of services, directors or chief executives and over 300 were clinicians.

The survey revealed a noticeable gap between those that see potential in AI and those that have plans to implement it within their organisations. Over 60% of respondents having no plans for using AI, as opposed to a mere 6% of respondents from each cohort that had been utilising it in their organisations.

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Sensors to Smartphones Bring Patent Wars to Diabetes Monitoring

Sensors to Smartphones Bring Patent Wars to Diabetes Monitoring | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Diabetes treatment has evolved since Mary Fortune was diagnosed in 1967 and hospitalized because there was no reliable way monitor her blood sugar. These days, a glucose skin patch transmits her levels day and night to her iPhone and shares the data with others.

Fortune and other diabetics are benefiting from an explosion in technology and innovation, from under-the-skin sensors that eliminate the need for painful finger pricks, to smartphone alerts when glucose levels rise too high. But the technology, and its integration with mobile devices, has brought the types of lawsuits typically seen by Silicon Valley companies.

For glucose monitors alone, the number of published patent applications has grown steadily for a decade and has accelerated significantly since 2015, according to an analysis by the research firm Patinformatics. More than 880 patent applications related to glucose monitoring have been published so far this year, said Tony Trippe, managing director of the Dublin, Ohio-based company.

“Everybody in the market is realizing there’s an enormous opportunity there,” said Paul Desormeaux, a senior analyst with Toronto-based Decision Resources Group. “Other players are starting to come in, and there’s a lot of competition to make advanced products.”

The boom is driven by a variety of factors, Desormeaux said. The number of people with diabetes in the U.S. is rising -- the Centers for Disease Control estimates more than 100 million Americans are now living with diabetes or prediabetes. Insurance coverage for new devices has increased, and there’s a growing number of partnerships between health companies and traditional technology firms such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp., and Fitbit Inc.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 14, 12:31 AM

Diabetes treatment has evolved since Mary Fortune was diagnosed in 1967 and hospitalized because there was no reliable way monitor her blood sugar. These days, a glucose skin patch transmits her levels day and night to her iPhone and shares the data with others.

Fortune and other diabetics are benefiting from an explosion in technology and innovation, from under-the-skin sensors that eliminate the need for painful finger pricks, to smartphone alerts when glucose levels rise too high. But the technology, and its integration with mobile devices, has brought the types of lawsuits typically seen by Silicon Valley companies.

For glucose monitors alone, the number of published patent applications has grown steadily for a decade and has accelerated significantly since 2015, according to an analysis by the research firm Patinformatics. More than 880 patent applications related to glucose monitoring have been published so far this year, said Tony Trippe, managing director of the Dublin, Ohio-based company.

“Everybody in the market is realizing there’s an enormous opportunity there,” said Paul Desormeaux, a senior analyst with Toronto-based Decision Resources Group. “Other players are starting to come in, and there’s a lot of competition to make advanced products.”

The boom is driven by a variety of factors, Desormeaux said. The number of people with diabetes in the U.S. is rising -- the Centers for Disease Control estimates more than 100 million Americans are now living with diabetes or prediabetes. Insurance coverage for new devices has increased, and there’s a growing number of partnerships between health companies and traditional technology firms such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp., and Fitbit Inc.

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Medical device and digitalisation: How to choose a software partner

Medical device and digitalisation: How to choose a software partner | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
In the age of digitalisation, technology demand grows daily even in highly conservative areas. Smart medical devices and enhanced medical software products such as the AI-powered insulin pump or Embody’s pre-operative planning software allow a seamless user experience, reduce risk and apply new approaches such as AI or VR to help reduce the cost of diagnosis.

Many medical device companies are now at the beginning of their digitalisation journey. Some of these manufacturers historically have no software technology capabilities in-house. At the same time, there are also niche startups in the industry, which are founded by doctors who are struggling with software development expertise and resources.

While the option of building an in-house technology department could still be considered, this approach requires significant upfront investment and can extend time-to-market. Therefore, involving a technology partner may be a solution that will offer the required expertise and resources for the long-term journey towards digitalisation.

According to ISO 13485 and ISO 9000-family standards, a manufacturer should control the outsourced processes and remain responsible for them. Therefore, if you are a chief information officer (CIO) of a medical device manufacturer and you’re just starting out on the journey of selecting a software technology partner, you will need to perform due diligence on companies you consider working with. Alongside some of the obvious points like technology expertise and cost estimates, here are a couple of other things to consider as part of the selection criteria
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Healthcare consumerism 2018: An update on the journey

Healthcare consumerism 2018: An update on the journey | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

McKinsey’s latest healthcare consumer research suggests that consumer engagement can improve care access, quality, and affordability. But to be successful, it requires true collaboration.

McKinsey’s 2017 Consumer Health Insights (CHI) Survey yielded several findings with important implications for health insurers, providers, and other industry stakeholders.1 Four important themes emerged:

- Affordability. The affordability of healthcare continues to be one of the most pressing consumer concerns and needs
- Continuity. Many consumers lack continuity in their healthcare ecosystem (e.g., in care delivery or health insurance)
- Digital. An increasing number of consumers are using digital healthcare tools, and interest in greater digital engagement continues to rise
- Engagement. Consumers are willing to engage in solutions to reduce healthcare costs, but most believe that they cannot do so today

These findings and their implications are discussed in detail below. Together, the findings deliver a clear message: Consumers want more from the healthcare industry. When survey respondents were asked what would make a healthcare company “the best,” coverage was ranked as most important (23%), followed by customer service (11%), cost (7%), and access (6%). Such basic “asks” would be unheard of in most industries. In fact, when the respondents were queried about which companies healthcare organizations should aspire to be like, they selected tech-focused innovators such as Amazon, Google, and Apple, as well as high-performing retailers (e.g., Chick-fil-A and Walmart). The types of interactions and relationships consumers have with these companies strongly suggest what they want from healthcare organizations.

Given how personal health is, healthcare organizations are uniquely positioned to become the companies consumers identify as the leading consumer enterprises. As of today, however, these organizations have a long way to go.

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Protection des données de santé : trois défis pour les hôpitaux

Protection des données de santé : trois défis pour les hôpitaux | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Le secteur de la santé publique a besoin d’un réseau unifié pour améliorer la qualité des services proposés aux patients sur l’ensemble du territoire. Mais cela pourrait poser des problèmes en matière de cybersécurité.

Selon une étude conduite récemment par le Clusif ( Club de la sécurité de l'information français ), 92 % des établissements de santé déclarent avoir formalisé une politique de sécurité du système d’information (PSSI), contre 50 % en 2014. Une augmentation importante qui répond aux exigences du Groupement Hospitalier des Territoires (GHT), qui pousse les institutions médicales vers la convergence de leurs systèmes d’information.

Le secteur de la santé publique a besoin d’un réseau unifié pour améliorer la qualité des services proposés aux patients sur l’ensemble du territoire, ainsi que pour améliorer l’efficacité opérationnelle des hôpitaux. Toutefois, l’initiative présente certaines problématiques du point de vue de la cybersécurité. En effet, plus l’infrastructure informatique est grande, plus la surface d’attaque est élevée. Trois principaux risques menacent ainsi le secteur de la santé publique, après l’adoption d’un SI unifié.


1. Vulnérabilité accrue des données médicales

Les dossiers médicaux électroniques (DME) sont essentiels aux établissements de santé qui doivent être capables de fournir des services sécurisés à leurs patients. Cependant, ils ont également un grand intérêt pour les pirates informatiques, qui peuvent prendre les données en otage ou les vendre sur le marché noir. Lorsque des hôpitaux rejoignent un réseau, il est possible que l’un d’entre eux devienne un maillon faible et qu’il compromette alors tous les autres établissements.

Les risques d’attaques de type ransomware restent élevés, même pour les hôpitaux indépendants. Un hôpital compromis ne peut pas faire le choix de perdre des données médicales, car il a une responsabilité envers les patients. Il est donc fort probable qu’il paie la rançon. En effet, si le ransomware vise le réseau central, tous les patients peuvent perdre l’accès aux services médicaux. Face à un risque de rupture de service aussi élevé, les pirates se permettent d’exiger des montants très élevés, et ce sans donner aucune garantie de décryptage.

Une autre façon de tirer parti des DME est de les rendre disponibles sur le marché noir. Plus les données sont détaillées, plus leur valeur est élevée : les prix oscillent entre 100 et 1 000 euros par personne. La situation est particulièrement préoccupante avec l’augmentation de l’utilisation de l’IoT en télémédecine. Ces équipements génèrent des quantités massives de données sur l’état de santé d’un individu et les envoient vers le cloud. Si des hôpitaux stockent des données issues d’objets connectés, ils deviennent automatiquement des cibles privilégiées pour les pirates informatiques.

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Achieving better patient outcomes with artificial intelligence

Achieving better patient outcomes with artificial intelligence | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Nurse Florence Nightingale may be most well-known as the British Army’s lady with the lamp, assiduously conducting night rounds and attending to the wounded by candle light.

But by demonstrating the link between poor sanitary conditions and high mortality rates in hospitals, it was her pioneering use of data collection and visualisation that still resonates today.

In 2018, medicine faces a different set of challenges, with longer life expectancies and population growth increasing the number of patients suffering with chronic conditions requiring ongoing care.

This has led to the cost of delivering health care increasing faster than GDP and quickly becoming unsustainable.

Transforming delivery with data

Over 160 years might have passed since Florence Nightingale’s day, but addressing these challenges still depends on data. By using it to unlock valuable insights, there’s an incredible opportunity to both accelerate medical breakthroughs and improve patient care.

Over the past decade, a great deal of focus has been on digitizing the sector’s records. But while this has been a success improving performance from an operational standpoint, we’ve yet to see it really transform the way we deliver services to patients. At present, health is data rich and information poor.

By applying cognitive technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) to this data, the sector can shift from traditional reactive treatments to a more proactive health system based on prevention, wellness, faster diagnosis and precision medicine.

The VP, Enterprise Research at analyst firm CCS Insight, Nicholas McQuire, sees AI “radically transform the health care industry over the next five years. AI will bring important improvements in operational effectiveness, care delivery and above all, patient outcomes. It will also be a vital tool in helping solve some of our most challenging health-related problems, not least how to balance restricted budgets and reduced workforces against the growth of chronic conditions.”

Providing personalized treatment

Evolving approaches to cancer illustrate the way in which AI can revolutionise health care across the whole sector.

Historically considered an acute terminal illness, medical knowledge is improving to the point where most cancers are classified as highly treatable conditions. That said, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) between 30 and 50 percent of cancer deaths could be avoided with prevention, early detection and treatment.

With the total economic impact of cancer costing the global economy over an estimated $1.16 trillion a year, we’re increasingly turning to the power of AI to address this issue, with oncology one of the most advanced areas of precision medicine.
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In 2018, medicine faces a different set of challenges, with longer life expectancies and population growth increasing the number of patients suffering with chronic conditions requiring ongoing care.

This has led to the cost of delivering health care increasing faster than GDP and quickly becoming unsustainable.

Transforming delivery with data

Over 160 years might have passed since Florence Nightingale’s day, but addressing these challenges still depends on data. By using it to unlock valuable insights, there’s an incredible opportunity to both accelerate medical breakthroughs and improve patient care.

Over the past decade, a great deal of focus has been on digitizing the sector’s records. But while this has been a success improving performance from an operational standpoint, we’ve yet to see it really transform the way we deliver services to patients. At present, health is data rich and information poor.

By applying cognitive technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) to this data, the sector can shift from traditional reactive treatments to a more proactive health system based on prevention, wellness, faster diagnosis and precision medicine.

The VP, Enterprise Research at analyst firm CCS Insight, Nicholas McQuire, sees AI “radically transform the health care industry over the next five years. AI will bring important improvements in operational effectiveness, care delivery and above all, patient outcomes. It will also be a vital tool in helping solve some of our most challenging health-related problems, not least how to balance restricted budgets and reduced workforces against the growth of chronic conditions.”

Providing personalized treatment

Evolving approaches to cancer illustrate the way in which AI can revolutionise health care across the whole sector.

Historically considered an acute terminal illness, medical knowledge is improving to the point where most cancers are classified as highly treatable conditions. That said, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) between 30 and 50 percent of cancer deaths could be avoided with prevention, early detection and treatment.

With the total economic impact of cancer costing the global economy over an estimated $1.16 trillion a year, we’re increasingly turning to the power of AI to address this issue, with oncology one of the most advanced areas of precision medicine.
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Reality check: VR and AI bring new options to healthcare

Reality check: VR and AI bring new options to healthcare | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

In Japanese hospitals, virtual reality (VR) is getting real. Together with augmented reality (AR), this technology—once the realm of devoted gamers—is now helping surgeons hone their technique.

Twelve hospitals across Japan are now using VR tech­nology from Tokyo-based Holoeyes, Inc. to view 3D models of organs such as the liver and kidneys. These VR reconstructions allow doctors to carefully plan the fine details of each procedure and provide them with a more accurate view of a patient’s anatomy during surgery.

The HoloEyes VR application was created using CT scan data from the company’s own healthcare database, compiled since the startup launched five years ago. Patients must consent to share their data, which doctors upload once it has been anonymized. For example, if a doctor enters search criteria such as “female, osteoporosis, 70s,” 3D images of matching cases will be returned. Such images can be used for diagnosis or training.

CEO Naoji Taniguchi started the company with Dr. Maki Sugimoto, a physician known for cutting-edge medical techniques. A strong connection to a respected physician is key to the success of Holoeyes and other health-tech startups, Taniguchi said. The company also took part in a 2017 startup accelerator program by Recruit Holdings Co., Ltd., and Taniguchi credits this with helping him to promote the business.

Though HoloEyes VR is still in the development stage, the tech­nology is already in use for actual surgical procedures—particularly for those involving organs with no blood flow, such as the liver or kidneys. “Because our tool is not diagnostic, we don’t need special licenses,” Taniguchi said.

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Artificial intelligence in Telemedicine and Telehealth - 4 Current Applications

Artificial intelligence in Telemedicine and Telehealth - 4 Current Applications | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Telehealth (or Telemedicine) is a growing sector of the healthcare industry which has steadily gained traction and formed a profitable sector, according to Transparency Market Research. The market research firm projects that total US revenue will hit $19.5 billion in 2025 up from $6 billion in 2016.

The implementation of telehealth practices and technology is showing increased adoption among healthcare providers and institutions. Results from a 2017 survey of 436 medical professionals conducted by telemedicine software company REACH Health shows that 51 percent ranked telemedicine as a “top” or “high’ priority in their practice.

In an effort to increase clinical and administrative capacity through telehealth, researchers are developing AI-driven technology for healthcare professionals and consumers.

This article will set out to determine the answers to the following questions:

What types of AI applications are emerging to improve telehealth capabilities in the healthcare industry?
How is the healthcare market implementing these AI applications?
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FundamentalVR launches new tool that lets physicians, students see, feel virtual surgery

FundamentalVR launches new tool that lets physicians, students see, feel virtual surgery | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

For young surgeons, watching a procedure from from the sidelines and performing an operation with their own hands are two very different experiences. But one company is trying to remedy this experience gap with a new interactive virtual reality platform that lets surgeons and trainees virtually see and feel what it's like to perform specific operations. 

 

Yesterday London-based FundamentalVR launched its new software platform, Fundamental Surgery, that combines VR with haptic sensors. The platform gives users physical feedback simulating the feel of performing an operation. 

 

“Our mission is to democratize surgical training by placing safe, affordable, and authentic simulations within arm’s reach of every surgeon in the world,” Richard Vincent, founder and CEO of FundamentalVR, said in a statement. “With the help of some of the top minds in medicine, as well some of the most advanced VR haptic programmers, we have created a solution that can be deployed anywhere — with limited investment — to allow surgeons to learn and hone their skills over and over again in a safe and controlled environment.”

 

Each time a surgeon or trainee uses the software they first log in to their personalized account. This allows the system to track, assess, and give feedback to the user on their performance, including their instrument use, procedural accuracy, and patient impact. Users and administrators are able to go in and look at the student or clinician’s progress and assessments, then pinpoint areas that need work.


Via Philippe Marchal
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Building a Culture of Preventative Health

Building a Culture of Preventative Health | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Aubrey Jenkins is on a moonshot mission to transform the way obesity and chronic disease medicine are delivered. Jenkins founded inHealth Medical Services in response to her mother’s struggles in finding an effective and affordable way to treat her morbid obesity. She realized, through her mother’s journey, that there was no support system in place for her — or the millions of Americans struggling with obesity — to turn to to consistently manage their weight loss and improve their overall health. A new and clinically-proven way to address this problem was needed.

This led to the creation of inHealth Medical Services, a company that offers a personalized, science-based coaching program. inHealth emphasizes a culture of preventative health and management, works alongside their primary care providers, and is reimbursed by commercial health plans, so patients never high face out-of-pocket costs.

A key part of their approach is that Aubrey and her team are building the company the “right way” — by methodical clinically testing and optimization of their solution’s efficacy before going to market at a larger scale. So far, that strategy is paying dividends. In their recent peer-reviewed publication on a 25-patient study, their proprietary methods showed a significant difference between the intervention and control groups for body weight loss.
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DeepMind's eye disease diagnoses on par with specialists

DeepMind's eye disease diagnoses on par with specialists | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
DeepMind's artificial intelligence system appears to diagnose eye disease as accurately as leading human specialists, according to new research published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Developed by researchers from Moorfields Eye Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, University College London (UCL), and DeepMind Health, the AI system can read complex eye scans and refer patients for further treatment, recognizing more than 50 eye conditions including glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy.

“The number of eye scans we’re performing is growing at a pace much faster than human experts are able to interpret them. There is a risk that this may cause delays in the diagnosis and treatment of sight-threatening diseases, which can be devastating for patients,” Dr. Pearse Keane, consultant ophthalmologist at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, said in a statement.

In the study, the researchers found that the system made the right referral recommendation in more than 94% of cases after training on 14,884 scans.

“The AI technology we’re developing is designed to prioritize patients who need to be seen and treated urgently by a doctor or eye care professional," Keane said. “If we can diagnose and treat eye conditions early, it gives us the best chance of saving people’s sight. With further research it could lead to greater consistency and quality of care for patients with eye problems in the future."
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The Unwritten Rules for Patient Advocacy on Social Media 

The Unwritten Rules for Patient Advocacy on Social Media  | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Social media’s ability to unify populations despite distance has come to be a key element for patients living with rare diseases, as online communities have provided support to patients who may otherwise have never found another human facing the same challenges as themselves. Whether it’s a closed Facebook group or a rare-disease-dedicated platform, like any community, these platforms must follow an unwritten set of rules that guide a productive and positive environment for its particularly vulnerable population.

Share Your Experience

First and foremost, these communities are places for people to find and connect with others facing similar challenging situations. One patient sharing his or her personal journey can cause others to feel less isolated given that they may be experiencing the same symptoms and difficulties they are, or even see patterns they hadn’t noticed in themselves.

Many patients with rare diseases have become consummate experts in what is going on in their disease state, having researched and kept up to date on what treatments are available, or in development, and where advocacy is needed. As the exchange of knowledge, experiences, and perspectives increases, so can advocacy. Ongoing and proactive communication can help galvanize the community to achieve their goals for increased access to resources through new legislation.

Don’t Let Others Learn the Hard Way

Share successes! Patients can help their peers prepare for the challenges of getting into a clinical trial, or on treatment and adhering to their regimen. Suggestions of fun activities and special recipes go a long way for preserving precious family moments despite disease-related limitations.

Sometimes patients share books they’ve read or movies that resonated with them—anything that applies to the patient experience is a valuable contribution to the group, big or small, and often these are not found in mainstream media. For example, the documentary film “Rare in Common” features the journeys of families in the rare disease community. As they go about living life as fully and lovingly as they can, while searching for a diagnosis and then treatment you get a glimpse of them as real-life heroes.

Another example is the illustrated children’s book “Rare is Everywhere,” which opens a door for parents and children to talk about how our differences, rooted in genetics, are to be celebrated. It introduces children to the white tiger, the blue lobster, and other animals whose genetic mutations make them different and beautiful! Proceeds go to the Rare Disease Foundation. A gem like this might go undiscovered without a social media network to spread the word.

Patients can also help each other seek help to pay for needed resources, for example, the National Organization of Rare Diseases (NORD) offers a financial assistance program for medical foods and supplements for patients with Urea Cycle Disorders.

Go Beyond the Social Networks

Allow social media to facilitate the connections, and then take it one step further. While these groups offer a sense of community, many patients and families also benefit from attending live events, such as the Rare Patient Advocacy Summit conducted by the non-profit Global Genes, where they can interact with their peers, advocates, and rare disease experts.

Patients and their families can also stay informed of pending legislation and the activities of the Rare Disease Congressional Caucus through Rare Disease Legislative Advocates, and then inform their peers of updates, or bring a group together for further advocacy through their social media networks.

Social media advocacy groups and similar platforms provide an opportunity to network with others across the globe that are in similar unique positions. Through unified communities, regardless of geographic location, rare disease patients and families can join together to change the landscape of opportunities for similar families to come.


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Artificial intelligence 'did not miss a single urgent case'

Artificial intelligence 'did not miss a single urgent case' | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence can diagnose eye disease as accurately as some leading experts, research suggests.

A study by Moorfields Eye Hospital in London and the Google company DeepMind found that a machine could learn to read complex eye scans and detect more than 50 eye conditions.

Doctors hope artificial intelligence could soon play a major role in helping to identify patients who need urgent treatment.

They hope it will also reduce delays.

A team at DeepMind, based in London, created an algorithm, or mathematical set of rules, to enable a computer to analyse optical coherence tomography (OCT), a high resolution 3D scan of the back of the eye.

Thousands of scans were used to train the machine how to read the scans.

Then, artificial intelligence was pitted against humans.

The computer was asked to give a diagnosis in the cases of 1,000 patients whose clinical outcomes were already known.

The same scans were shown to eight clinicians - four leading ophthalmologists and four optometrists.

Each was asked to make one of four referrals: urgent, semi-urgent, routine and observation only.
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Japan plans 10 'AI hospitals' to ease doctor shortages

Japan plans 10 'AI hospitals' to ease doctor shortages | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
The Japanese government is teaming up with businesses and academia to set up hospitals enhanced by artificial intelligence, seeking to allow short-handed doctors to spend more time on patient care while curbing medical spending.

The government is expected to invest more than $100 million in the effort over half a decade, with a target of establishing 10 model hospitals by the end of fiscal 2022. AI will help with tasks from updating patients' charts to analyzing tests and parsing images to help with diagnoses.

The effort aims to address structural challenges to health care, including the chronic lack of doctors and nurses in some areas and rising medical expenses. The initiative will also help make Japan more competitive on the world stage, giving AI development a shot in the arm and helping boost exports of medical equipment.

Three ministries central to the effort -- the education, industry and health ministries -- will recruit participating companies and hospitals this month, targeting AI specialists and medical equipment makers. A basic working framework will be established as early as September, with initial efforts set to focus on cancer patients.

Participants will develop AI-assisted programs that will automatically enter information into patients' medical records based on their conversations with doctors during examinations. That is expected to free doctors to focus on patients and give more time for discussing their conditions.

AI will also be used to parse magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic imaging, as well as analyze blood tests and other information. It will even study patients' DNA to help pick the most appropriate methods of treatment.
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Machine Learning for Nursing - 8 Current Applications

Machine Learning for Nursing - 8 Current Applications | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

With an ongoing nurse shortage in the United States and other areas, startups and global companies have begun developing methods for handling time-consuming responsibilities traditionally held by nurses, ranging from daily operations to diagnosis.

In an effort to give hospitals and healthcare providers insight on how AI is being used in the nursing field, this article aims to answer the following questions:

- How is artificial intelligence and machine learning affecting the field of nursing?
- Should health organizations adopt machine learning technology?

In our research, we have found three areas of nursing where the use of AI seems to be emerging:

- Virtual Nurses
- Robotics
- Record Keeping / Informatics / Operations

We’ll explore use-cases and examples of all three areas, including detailed descriptions of their functions, and video demos when applicable.

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Researchers at Rutgers University develop wearable that can count blood cells, air particles #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Researchers at Rutgers University develop wearable that can count blood cells, air particles #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick claim to have come up with a new wearable that can detect blood cell counts as well as particles in the air. 

 

"Current wearables can measure only a handful of physical parameters such as heart rate and exercise activity," Abbas Furniturewalla, the study's lead author and a former undergraduate researcher in Rutger's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, said in a statement. "The ability for a wearable device to monitor the counts of different cells in our bloodstream would take personal health monitoring to the next level.”

 

The research, which was recently published in Microsystems and Nanoengineering, outlines the device design. Researchers created an arm wearable that includes a microfluidic impedance cytometer on a flexible substrate with a microfluidic biosensor.

 

Through a pin-prick blood sample pipetted into a standard microfluidic PDMS chip, the system is able to count blood cells quicker than the standard of care, the researcher said. The system is also able to transfer data through a circuit to process electrical signals and a micro-controller which can digitize the data and sent it to a Bluetooth module, according to a statement.  

 

Once the system gets the blood cell count, it is then able to transfer the data over to a doctor via a smartphone. 

 

The researchers said that in the future they will continue to test the platform by sampling data as it is being worn during activities. This will allow them to adjust the circuit biosensor design to lessen the effects of motion and “environmental disturbance” on the device. 


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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 14, 12:35 AM

Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick claim to have come up with a new wearable that can detect blood cell counts as well as particles in the air. "Current wearables can measure only a handful of physical parameters such as heart rate and exercise activity," Abbas Furniturewalla, the study's lead author and a former undergraduate researcher in Rutger's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, said in a statement. "The ability for a wearable device to monitor the counts of different cells in our bloodstream would take personal health monitoring to the next level.”  The research, which was recently published in Microsystems and Nanoengineering, outlines the device design. Researchers created an arm wearable that includes a microfluidic impedance cytometer on a flexible substrate with a microfluidic biosensor.  Through a pin-prick blood sample pipetted into a standard microfluidic PDMS chip, the system is able to count blood cells quicker than the standard of care, the researcher said. The system is also able to transfer data through a circuit to process electrical signals and a micro-controller which can digitize the data and sent it to a Bluetooth module, according to a statement.   Once the system gets the blood cell count, it is then able to transfer the data over to a doctor via a smartphone. The researchers said that in the future they will continue to test the platform by sampling data as it is being worn during activities. This will allow them to adjust the circuit biosensor design to lessen the effects of motion and “environmental disturbance” on the device.  But it isn’t just blood cells that this wearable is focused on. Researchers said it is also able to count organic and inorganic particles in the air that could contribute to our health. "This would be really important for settings with lots of air pollutants and people want to measure the amount of tiny particles or dust they're exposed to day in and day out,” Mehdi Javanmard, senior author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the School of Engineering, said in a statement. "Miners, for example, could sample the environment they're in."

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Social Media for Optometrists: Finding Content for Your Business Page

Social Media for Optometrists: Finding Content for Your Business Page | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

By now you understand that a strong presence on social media platforms keeps your optometry practice relevant to your younger patient base. But as an independent eyecare practice you might not have all of the time, or resources, to constantly stay on top of a social media presence for your practice.

Although it can be a time consuming challenge to find information that will be relevant and interesting to your followers, it's definitely one worth investing in. We put together a few resources and ideas below that will help you curate content for your practice's social media pages.

Let's start with a few statistics to show you the power of social media:

  • 95% of millennials expect brands to have a Facebook Page.
    • On top of that, 87% of Gen X (30-44 year olds), and even 70% of those aged 45-60 think brands should have a Facebook Page.
  • 41% of people said social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital, or medical facility.
  • 60% of doctors say social media improves the quality of care delivered to patients.

Consumers want to do business with people and companies that they like and can relate to. Social media is your space to develop a voice that builds relationships by providing information that is valuable, informative, relatable, and funny.


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Top 10 Healthcare Startups that will Change the Future

Top 10 Healthcare Startups that will Change the Future | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Advances in data science and artificial intelligence are giving rise to a new wave of healthcare startups that focus on predictive analytics, precision medicine and improved patient care. Growth in the digital health market is anticipated to rise at a CAGR of 13.4% between 2017 and 2025, reaching $536.6 billion by the end of 2025. Here are 10 top healthcare startups (worldwide) that are redefining innovation:

SWORD Health
You no longer have to be physically present for physical therapy — Porto/San Fancisco-based SWORD Health has developed the world’s first AI-powered digital physical therapist. After an assessment of rehabilitation needs, the clinical team prescribes a tailored programme which the patient can take home. A high-precision motion tracker is strapped on to the patient, which wirelessly communicates data to the virtual therapist. The digital therapist is then able to guide the patient through the correct exercises remotely, making sure that they are performed correctly.


Prognos
With the ambitious aim of eradicating disease, Prognos (formerly Medivo) uses AI and advanced data analytics to help predict disease at the earliest. They have a huge laboratory network with access 13 billion patient records, and this data is enriched before AI is applied to it for actionable insights. This registry helps identify patients at risk and develop tailored treatment plans. Prognos also provides a solution for payers, who can use analytics to assess risk populations/members and identify “care gaps”.


Flatiron Health
Flatiron Health is an oncology-focused electronic health records (EHR) company that aims to accelerate cancer research and improve patient care. They offer an EMR system that reduces time and cost, an analytics platform that helps derive relevant insights from data, and a service that screens patients for eligibility for clinical trials. They work with hospitals, community clinics, academics and life sciences companies. Backed by Alphabet, the company was bought over by Roche in early 2018.


Modern Fertility
This San Francisco-based startup offers a fertility hormone test that women can take at home. You just have to take a simple finger-prick test and return it through the mail for a physician-approved report about your hormones and a fertility profile. The company partners with Quest Diagnostics, which has 2000+ centers in the US. Founded by two former Uber and 23andME execs and launched at Y Combinator, the company raised $6 million in May 2018.


DayTwo
California-based DayTwo analyzes your gut microbiome, based on which it offers personalized nutrition advice. You provide a stool sample and a blood test result, the company profiles your gut microbiome at the genetic level, based on which it recommends what foods you should and shouldn’t eat. It secured $12 million funding in 2017 from Johnson & Johnson, Mayo Clinic, and other investors.

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