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Harnessing the Power of the Digital Patient


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Dominique Godefroy's insight:

The biopharmaceutical industry is currently facing a number of macro-environmental factors, which underscore its need to
think of itself not as a developer of singular products, but as a critical part of an interoperable system. This fundamental shift
must include a strategic approach for engaging with an increasingly informed and connected patient population.

The amount of medical information now available to patients online is truly remarkable. Coupled with a decrease in the amount
of time physicians can actually spend with their patients, today’s health care consumers are savvy, engaged and have a strong
desire to learn as much as they can about their diseases.

By not directly engaging with patients, biopharmaceutical companies are missing an enormous opportunity to reduce the time
and cost of clinical development and maximize the return on their development investments. However, by earning patient trust
and creating a two-way dialog, some companies have been able to engage patients to participate and remain in research; prove
product value and safety by directly gathering personal outcomes, medical records, and diagnostic data from labs or devices;
and accelerate product adoption and adherence.

This white paper discusses how biopharmaceutical companies can harness the power of the digital patient when it engages
them in the appropriate manner. Quintiles’ Digital Patient Unit was founded to continue to innovate around these areas
of opportunity.

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Integrating digital biomarkers into precision medicine

Integrating digital biomarkers into precision medicine | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Technology’s role in precision medicine is impacting the way researchers and clinicians are able to explain and predict health-related outcomes. Increasingly, through the use of innovative devices such as portables, wearables, interactives, implantables and ingestibles, life science companies are looking to use ‘digital biomarkers’ to measure physiological, cognitive or behavioural characteristics.

Digital biomarkers provide access to new types of insights and offer unique advantages by allowing data to be generated frequently and as part of the patient’s daily life. Moreover, these low-cost, high-efficiency tools can be integrated into existing biomarker strategies. With an increase in well-validated digital health tools and continued investment in this technology, we can expect to see digital biomarkers play a major role in diagnosis and health outcomes.

How can we use digital biomarkers?

Digital biomarkers can be integrated into an existing biomarker strategy as a complementary tool or as a stand-alone measure. As with traditional biomarkers, well-designed and validated digital biomarkers can generate significant advantages in study design; they can help to recruit the optimal study population, predict study outcomes or yield efficiencies in study length or size. Regulators and payers are also increasingly interested in the insights yielded by digital biomarkers. From their perspective, they can generate meaningful evidence of safety and efficacy, support marketing claims and inform payer review of clinical utility and value.
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ONC: Artificial Intelligence Has Potential to Reshape Healthcare

ONC: Artificial Intelligence Has Potential to Reshape Healthcare | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Artificial intelligence is playing an increasingly important role in healthcare analytics and will continue to dramatically influence the development of clinical decision support and business intelligence, says a new report by JASON, commissioned by the ONC.

Artificial intelligence, especially the branch of computer science known as deep neural networks or deep learning, has the potential to drastically improve the way clinicians and patients interact with data – if the industry focuses on cutting through the hype and implementing strong underlying governance and interoperability principles at the beginning of its development.

“The rapid digitization of health data through the use of heath information technology (health IT) in the United States has created major opportunities in the use of AI,” wrote a team of officials from the ONC, AHRQ, and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in an accompanying blog post.

“Innovators and experts see potential in using digital health data to improve healthcare and health outcomes from the home to the clinic to the community. Yet, current AI is powered and limited by its access to digital data. With a range of health-related data sets, AI could potentially help improve the health of Americans.”

Health data is abundant, but it is also frequently locked away in siloes or proprietary formats that make it difficult to combine with external sources. Privacy concerns and competing business initiatives also tend to discourage organizations from sharing their data assets for research purposes, leaving AI and machine learning experts without the fuel they need to make the most of their algorithms and tools.

To better understand how to address these barriers, ONC asked JASON to lay out the opportunities, limitations, and potential use cases for AI in the next decade. JASON is an independent association of scientists and academics that has been advising the federal government on technical issues for decades.

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AI-backed blood test could reduce reliance on cancer drugs

AI-backed blood test could reduce reliance on cancer drugs | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
A new artificial intelligence-based blood test can identify eight common cancers by detecting the mutated DNA and proteins emitted by tumours – an approach that could reduce reliance on cancer drugs and allow disease to be treated by surgery alone.

The scientists from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Maryland, say the research lays the foundation for a single blood test for cancers of many types.

It opens the tantalising possibility of being able to detect cancers early using blood tests, although at the moment the system is limited to ovary, liver, oesophagus, pancreas, stomach, colorectal, lung and breast cancer.

The new test, CancerSEEK, measures circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) from 16 genes as well as eight protein biomarkers, then uses machine-based learning to analyse the data.

Overall, the test found around 70% of cancers, and five of the eight cancers investigated have no screening programmes for early detection.

Early detection could mean that doctors would be able to intervene sooner to remove tumours, before they spread, according to a report published online in the journal Science.

Although the system is a long way from the market, corresponding author Anne Marie Lennon told Medscape that the test could detect some cancers “early enough that they could be cured by surgery alone”.

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Santé, UX et IA: la pluridisciplinarité, facteur clé pour la médecine de demain

Santé, UX et IA: la pluridisciplinarité, facteur clé pour la médecine de demain | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Tout comme les données captées lors des interactions avec le client permettent de lui proposer des contenus/offres personnalisés pour mieux vendre, celles qui sont collectées à partir des échanges patient-soignant doivent donner lieu à un diagnostique pertinent et un traitement adapté.

La convergence des pratiques en termes de connaissance et d’expérience usager dépasse la frontière des entreprises et des secteurs. Les médecins comprennent qu’ils ont tout intérêt à s’inspirer des bonnes pratiques d’UX et de connaissance client que l’on trouve en premier lieu dans les directions marketing des entreprises mais encore auprès d’ingénieurs industriels. Si les techniques utilisées dans le marketing prédictif permettent à la fois d’anticiper les comportements des clients et leurs besoins futurs, il est envisageable que celles-ci puissent permettre de réaliser de meilleurs diagnostiques médicaux. C’est du moins ce qu’envisagent les scientifiques, start-up et industriels réunis à l’occasion du colloque sur la santé et les technologies à l’Ecole Centrale de Marseille le mois dernier.

Nous parlons ici de connaissance et de relation patient, de pluridisciplinarité et de l’évolution de la place des médecins dans un futur proche.

Dans le monde médical nous ne sommes pas ceux qui connaissons le mieux le comportement des patients. Les meilleurs experts travaillent dans l’industrie de la consommation : chez Wallmart, Amazon, etc. Il est temps de mettre cette expertise des neurosciences du consommateur à la disposition de la santé et des patients. Olivier Oullier, Président de EMOTIV

La connaissance du patient et sa relation au soignant

Si la connaissance du patient par son médecin a des fins bien différentes de celles de la connaissance du client par la marque, les procédés de collecte des données doivent être similaires. Il est urgent que les experts de la santé créent des connexions avec leurs homologues du marketing et de l’expérience client pour reproduire de meilleurs schémas de collecte de datas. Tout comme les données captées lors des interactions avec le client permettent de lui proposer des contenus/offres personnalisés pour mieux vendre, celles qui sont collectées lors des échanges patient-soignant doivent permettre un diagnostique pertinent et un traitement adapté.

Bien que semblable à certains égards, les relations marque-client et soignant-patient diffèrent d’après moi à deux niveaux:

On peut espérer que l’engagement du patient (sa volonté d’échanger avec son médecin) soit plus important que dans le cas du client dès lors qu’il s’agît de sa santé.
Le stress du patient provoqué par le contexte médical est un biais non négligeable dans sa relation au médecin dès lors qu’il peut troubler la qualité des échanges.

Tout comme l’analyse de parcours client est un préalable indispensable à l’optimisation de son expérience avec la marque, il convient d’impliquer davantage le patient dans ses soins en lui offrant un parcours médical de qualité. Au delà de la qualité de l’expérience, il s’agît pour l’équipe de soignants de collecter des informations cruciales sur le patient au delà de son diagnostique médical: ses attentes et ses craintes. Nous pouvons dès lors envisager un parcours individualisé qui profiterait au patient (traitement) et au centre de soins (réduction des coûts et motivation du personnel soignant).

La santé de demain ne pourra s’envisager sans des processus efficients de collecte et d’analyse de datas sur le patient.
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Report: Global Digital Health Funding Tops $7.2B in 2017

Report: Global Digital Health Funding Tops $7.2B in 2017 | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Global digital health funding, including private equity and corporate venture capital reached a record-breaking total of $7.2B in 2017 over 778 deals, representing a 42 percent increase from the $5.1B in 622 deals in 2016, according to the latest report from Mercom Capital Group. Mercom’s Q4 and Annual 2017 Digital Health Funding and M&A report reveals total corporate funding for Healthcare IT companies – including debt and public market financing – climbed to $8.2 billion in 2017, a 47 percent increase from the $5.6 billion raised in 2016.

U.S. companies raised a total of $4.9B in 2017 with $2.3B coming from other countries. Since 2010, the sector had $26B in VC funding in 3,450 deals and $8.6B in debt and public market financing (including IPOs), for a total of ~$34B.

The report covers both consumer-centric and patient-centric technologies and sub-technologies, including: Social Health, Mobile Health (mHealth), Telehealth, Personal Health, Rating & Shopping, Health Information Management, Revenue Cycle Management, Service Providers and Security.
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Biocon and Sandoz strike biosimilars partnership

Biocon and Sandoz strike biosimilars partnership | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Biosimilars firms Biocon and Sandoz have formed a worldwide partnership to develop the next generation of biosimilars in immunology and cancer.

Biocon already has a long-standing partnership with Mylan to develop biosimilars, producing around six biosimilars including cut-price versions of blockbusters such AbbVie’s Humira (adalimumab) and Roche’s Herceptin (trastuzumab) breast cancer drug.

After a delay caused by quality shortcomings at a manufacturing plant, Biocon and Mylan managed to get their Herceptin biosimilar approved by the FDA last month.

Sandoz is also a major player in this field and was the first company to get a biosimilar approved in Europe, back in 2006, and in the US in 2015.

The new partnership between the two players reflects a drive to cut overheads and increase profitability in the increasingly competitive market.

Under the latest deal Sandoz and Biocon will share responsibility for end-to-end development, manufacturing and regulatory filings for an unspecified number of products.

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The Augmented Researcher: What Does 2018 Hold for AI in Publishing?

The Augmented Researcher: What Does 2018 Hold for AI in Publishing? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Scholarly publishing has changed considerably in recent years. Perhaps the biggest transformation is one we now take for granted – the move to digital. Publishing and scientific R&D are not the only industries to have witnessed the remarkable impact of digitization on how people work. But for our industry, this development is especially important due to the sheer volume of data researchers must sift through. The growth in the value of indexing, for example, alongside various forms of analytics, has dramatically changed scholarly publishing for the better. In a world where approximately 2.5 million new scientific papers are published each year, digitization has become the imperative.

Digitization, when supported by the right analytical tools, has made it far easier for researchers to find answers and insights into increasingly complex problems by filtering out the unnecessary data from the huge volumes available to them. To find out exactly what the right analytical tools are, many companies have invested in Artificial Intelligence (AI); with analysts Forrester estimating that the AI market grew by 300% in 2017. Technology, and particularly AI, is leading to the emergence of the ‘augmented researcher’.

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Robots médecins, génétique et Big data : ces (autres) sujets abordés aux Etats généraux de la bioéthique

Robots médecins, génétique et Big data : ces (autres) sujets abordés aux Etats généraux de la bioéthique | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Lors de ses vœux aux représentants des communautés religieuses, Emmanuel Macron avait promis "un vrai débat philosophique dans la société". Les Etats généraux de la bioéthique démarrent jeudi, et s’étaleront jusqu’à juillet. Au programme : des ateliers, des débats, des consultations partout en France, avec pour objectif une révision de la loi de 1994 sur la bioéthique, attendue pour la fin d’année. Médecins, professionnels, associations, élus, Hauts fonctionnaires sont conviés à y participer, au même titre que tout citoyen qui souhaite s’y inscrire (un site internet sera créé à la fin du mois).

Parmi les sujets attendus, se trouve bien sûr l’ouverture de la Procréation médicale assistée (PMA) aux couples de femmes, promesse de campagne du président de la République. Autre sujet majeur qui sera évoqué lors de tables rondes, sans que cela ne se traduise dans la loi : la fin de vie. Mais d’autres sujets, moins médiatisés et tout aussi fondamentaux, seront également abordés. Avec une question en lame de fond : comment se pratiquera la médecine à l’avenir, alors que la technologie ne cesse de progresser et que les données personnelles dans le domaine de la santé se démultiplient sur la toile.


# Protection des données de santé

Qui doit avoir accès aux données de santé ? Ordonnances, feuilles de soin, évolution des prix des médicaments, échantillons de population, efficacité des traitements, effets secondaires constatés sur les patients… Des millions d'informations sur la santé des Français sont, en France, stockées dans les bases de données de la Sécurité sociale. Mais aujourd'hui, très peu d'organismes y ont réellement accès, alors qu’elles pourraient considérablement faire avancer la recherche. Le sujet sera au cœur de ces Etats généraux.

"Les données de santé peuvent poser des questions éthiques importantes, dans leur utilisation ou leur croisement avec d’autres informations médicales, notamment dans le cadre d’une médecine prédictive. C’est notamment le développement du recours à des objets connectés qui pose la question de la transmission de ces données, et de leur collecte et utilisation par des tiers", résume le Comité consultatif national d’éthique (CCNE). Qui rappelle : "les masses de données ainsi constituées (Big Data) créent un risque majeur d’atteinte à la vie privée, en rompant l’anonymat puisque des renseignements très précis, et en continu, sur l’état de santé et autres données personnelles de la personne concernée peuvent être délivrés". Comment faire avancer la recherche sans donner d’informations personnelles sur les patients ? L’équation devra être résolue avant l’été.


#Cellules souches

Peut-on traiter un embryon humain ou des cellules souches humaines comme n’importe quelle cellule destinée à la recherche médicale ? Ce sera l’une des questions abordées lors de ces Etats généraux. Thérapies cellulaires, compréhension de certaines maladies néonatales, nouvelles sources de greffons… Les possibilités de développement thérapeutique à partir d’embryon humain sont nombreuses. Mais "une tension éthique incontestable apparaît entre le respect dû à l’embryon comme personne potentielle et l’importance de poursuivre des recherches dont les résultats pourraient être traduits au bénéfice des patients", commente le Comité consultatif national d’éthique.

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How Gaming Could Help ER Doctors Save More Lives

How Gaming Could Help ER Doctors Save More Lives | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
No one masters a skill without mistakes, but when you’re a health care provider, screw ups can be deadly. In 2016, the National Academy of Sciences found that every year up to 30,000 civilian and military deaths of trauma patients could be prevented if the injured people had received optimal care.A new video game developed by a critical care doctor at the University of Pittsburgh aims to help emergency medicine physicians build trauma expertize in a low-stakes environment.
Via Alex Butler, Rémy TESTON
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Denise Silber's curator insight, January 19, 6:19 PM
More than one game or high tech tool out there to teach physicians. Will be interesting to see which ones succeed.
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Apple CareKit powers Sharp HealthCare's surgery support app in pilot

Apple CareKit powers Sharp HealthCare's surgery support app in pilot | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
San Diego-based Sharp HealthCare is one of the latest providers to use Apple’s CareKit, an open source toolkit for hospitals and health systems, to develop its mobile offering, the Sharp Health Companion app. The software is designed to help people navigate their surgery experience, including pre-surgery care, interventions, and post-surgery care.

In the pilot, which focused on cataract surgery patients, Sharp reported that patients achieved an average medication adherence rate of 78.2 percent. The Sharp research team also reported zero surgery cancellations, zero post-surgery complications and zero readmissions.

“The genesis of our app came from years of feedback from patients and care team members from the frontline who simply did not want to continue with the status quo of our current process,” Dr. Tommy Korn, an ophthalmologist with Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group, said in a statement. “Our team approached the project from the perspective of the patient. What would we want if our own beloved parent was about to undergo cataract surgery?”
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A new pair of AR specs addresses Alzheimer's disease.

A new pair of AR specs addresses Alzheimer's disease. | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
One of the most anguishing consequences of advanced Alzheimer’s disease is that patients fail to recognise their loved ones’ faces. This is due both to patients’ fading memory and to the deterioration of their faculty for “holistic perception”—the visual process that helps us recall a “mental name tag” when we see a known person’s face. Needless to say, such forgetfulness is painful and distressing for both patients and their families. That is why an American startup is combining augmented reality (AR) and machine learning to tackle this symptom.

New Jersey-based ThirdEye presented its X1 Smart Glasses at CES 2018 in Las Vegas. “AR technology has reached a point where it can be miniaturised enough to be able to fit on people’s faces, but it is also powerful enough to have features that make a difference,” says founder and CEO Nick Cherukuri. The company has fitted its headset with a neural network that can be trained to recognise human faces. The headset can process several pictures of an Alzheimer’s patient’s loved ones and learn to label those people every time they are in front of the glasses.
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Sonder la santé du tube digestif grâce à une capsule connectée

Sonder la santé du tube digestif grâce à une capsule connectée | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
a mesure des gaz présents dans le tube digestif a une valeur significative dans la compréhension de la pathogenèse et le diagnostic des troubles du tube digestif. Une étude pilote réalisée chez des volontaires sains a démontré la précision et la sécurité d’utilisation d’une petite capsule électronique pour mesurer en temps réel l’oxygène, l’hydrogène et le dioxyde de carbone dans le tractus digestif.

En pratique, la capsule ingérable, mesurant 26 mm de long sur 9,8 mm de large transmet les concentrations de gaz digestifs à un moniteur-récepteur de poche qui affiche les profils en temps réel sur un téléphone mobile (grâce à une communication Bluetooth entre ce dernier et le récepteur).

Cette étude livre plusieurs résultats intéressants parmi lesquels, entre autres : une concentration en oxygène plus élevée dans l’estomac (>65%) que dans l’atmosphère (21%), mais bien plus basse dans l’intestin grêle (<5%) et dans le côlon (<1%). Les concentrations de dihydrogène et de dioxyde de carbone augmentent lors du passage dans l’iléon.

Cette étude a également permis d’évaluer les changements des profils en gaz en réponse à une modifications de l’alimentation. En cas de régime riche en fibres, la concentration en oxygène reste supérieure à 10%, même dans le colon distal avant que la capsule soit expulsée. Autre observation intéressante : un temps de transition court de la capsule dans l’intestin grêle en cas de régime pauvre en fibres mais prolongé en cas de régime riche en fibres. Quel que soit le régime en fibres, une augmentation des concentrations en dioxyde carbonique et en dihydrogène a été notée dans l’intestin grêle distal et en particulier dans le colon proximal, un résultat compatible avec la fermentation des hydrates de carbone.
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Retooling drug development with next-generation machine learning, Owkin nabs $11M

Retooling drug development with next-generation machine learning, Owkin nabs $11M | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Relatively small and dispersed data sets and privacy issues represent two challenges in applying machine learning in drug development. Enter predictive analytics firm Owkin, which aims to overcome them through transfer and federated learning. It has secured $11 million in series A to do just that.

With the $11 million, plus the $2.1 million from seed financing, Owkin will improve its artificial intelligence platform called Owkin Socrates, cultivate partnerships with leading healthcare organizations and fuel internal growth, the company said in a statement.

Owkin Socrates builds machine-learning models and algorithms that analyze molecular and medical imaging libraries as well as patient profiles to uncover complex biomarker patterns behind diseases. Designed to assist drug researchers in preclinical and clinical studies and clinicians in healthcare settings, it can build models for automated diagnostics, prediction of treatment outcomes or clinical trial optimization.

Unlike many other AI-based drug development platforms, Owkin Socrates utilizes two machine learning tools—transfer learning and federated learning. Gilles Wainrib, PhD., co-founder and CSO of Owkin, explained to FierceBiotech via email how they work.

Transfer learning improves learning capacities on one data set or project through knowledge gathered from another related task. This allows machine learning to be applicable in smaller data sets—a few hundreds of patients from clinical trials, for instance. In drug development, deep learning applied to pathology image analysis can provide insight to stratify patients or to predict drug response efficiently.

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Graph power: life sciences lead in intelligent data use

Graph power: life sciences lead in intelligent data use | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Graph technology is allowing pharma to model data in a way that offers invaluable insights for marketing, R&D and compliance teams alike.

Google, Facebook and LinkedIn are among those utilising graph technology, which can model real-world relationships in a way that was not possible in the past.

But it is the life sciences industry that is leading the way in the adoption of this technology. It can share data seamlessly and uncover relationships hidden in broad ranges of data sets, making it invaluable to R&D and sales teams alike.

This article examines the advantages of graph technology over traditional databases and analytics, and considers what the future of data management in life sciences may hold.

Why graphs?

A graph is made up of nodes – real-life entities, like health care providers (HCPs), Integrated Delivery Networks (IDNs) and products – that can be connected to signify relationships. These may be employees, prescribers, or caregivers, with the number of nodes and relationships that can be entered unlimited.

This model can represent real-world relationships much more clearly than relational databases that have rigid schemas.

Leading consumer applications, like LinkedIn and Facebook, utilise graphs to easily identify and visualise complex relationships in a simple interface. This technology is an elegant, powerful way to solve complex data problems.

Being able to connect HCPs, products, healthcare organisations (HCOs) and locations in many-to-many relationships, reveals deeper insights than traditional databases.

Graph technology can quickly identify an HCP’s channel choice, content preferences, influence in a disease area, prescribed products and clinical trial participation, for example. The graph helps model the roll-up of dynamic hierarchical information, such as revenue, value, or prescription by site of care, and also aids in finding key influencers.

Graph technology can also play a significant role in entity resolution. For example, it can help identify an HCP engaging with different channels, or working at various locations as one, rather than multiple, people.

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Researchers Use AI Technology to Chart Immune Cell Receptor

Researchers Use AI Technology to Chart Immune Cell Receptor | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Johns Hopkins scientists have used a form of artificial intelligence to create a map that compares types of cellular receptors, the chemical "antennas" on the surface of immune system T-cells. Their experiments with lab-grown mouse and human T-cells suggest that people with cancer who have a greater variety of such receptors may respond better to immunotherapy drugs and vaccines.

A report on how the scientists created and tested what they call "ImmunoMap" appeared Dec. 20 in Cancer Immunology Research.

"ImmunoMap gives scientists a picture of the wide diversity of the immune system's responses to cellular antigens," says Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology, medicine and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Receptors on T-cells recognize antigens, or pieces of other cells that trigger an immune response, particularly antibodies. If the antigens are foreign, T-cells raise the alarm within the immune system, which can distribute an "all-points bulletin" to be on the lookout for the unfamiliar antigens.

Because diseases such as cancer tend to evade detection by T-cells' receptors, allowing a tumor to grow unchecked, scientists have long sought "intel" on this process as a means of developing therapies that target malignant cells, but leave healthy cells alone.

"Much of immunotherapy today is built on the premise that we know these antigens," says Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering M.D./Ph.D. student John-William Sidhom. "But we actually don't know as much as we need to about them and the T-cells that recognize them."

To address that need, Sidhom used high-powered computing to create a mathematical model--essentially a digital map--of genomic sequence data of receptors from human T-cells that were exposed to a virus in the laboratory. "Our goal was to cluster T-cell receptors that are similar and may target the same antigen," says Sidhom.
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Artificial Intelligence Aids in Diagnosing Rare Disease

Artificial Intelligence Aids in Diagnosing Rare Disease | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
An international team of scientists are using data on genetic material, cell surface texture and typical facial features derived by artificial intelligence methods to simulate disease models for deficiencies in the molecule glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, which is known to cause various diseases.

One of the diseases is Mabry syndrome, a rare disease that is triggered by a change in a single gene, causing mental retardation.

“This disease belongs to a group that we describe as GPI anchor deficiencies and which includes more than 30 genes,” physician and physicist Dr. Peter Krawitz from the Institute for Genome Statistics and Bioinformatics of the University Hospital Bonn, said in a statement.

GPI anchors attach specific proteins to the cell membrane and if they do not properly function due to a gene mutation, signal transmission and further steps in the cell-cell communication are impaired.

The researchers investigated how a diagnosis of GPI anchor deficiencies can be improved with modern and fast DNA sequencing methods, cell surface analysis and computer aided image recognition.

The scientists used photographs of the faces of 91 patients and found cell surface changes characteristic for GPI anchor deficiencies in a number of the patients. Genetic analysis also revealed gene mutations that are typical for this rare group of diseases.

“The artificial modeling of gene-typical faces that we achieved with these datasets clearly shows that the computer-aided evaluation of patients' portraits can facilitate and improve the diagnosis of GPI anchor deficiencies, which is significant progress,” Alexej Knaus, Ph.D., lead author from the Institute for Genome Statistics and Bioinformatics of the University Hospital Bonn, said in a statement.
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Digital health trends and predictions for 2018, part 1

Digital health trends and predictions for 2018, part 1 | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
In 2018, both social and technological trends will drive the transformation of healthcare. MobiHealthNews spoke to a range of stakeholders in the field to ask what they saw coming down the tracks. Read on for some general trends and predictions for digital health and healthcare during the coming year, and beyond. And watch this space next week for part two, including predictions about telemedicine, the FDA, and remote patient monitoring.

1. Vertical integration will transform the healthcare landscape

News that CVS-Caremark and Aetna were considering a merger took many by surprise. But experts on health, health tech, and health policy say the move made a lot of sense — and looking ahead we may well see more like it. The merger demonstrates the transformation happening in healthcare as traditional stakeholders find themselves struggling in a healthcare world that is increasingly not patient- but consumer-driven.

“If you look at a CVS plus a Caremark plus an Aetna, that’s vertical integration,” Jeff Arnold, CEO of Sharecare, told MobiHealthNews. “You’re starting to control the whole value chain. And you have disruptors on the horizon like Amazon that accelerate vertical integration. If Amazon got into Rx, and they disrupted Rx like they’ve disrupted everything else, you see really fast why a CVS-Caremark-Aetna combination makes sense. So where can that go? ExpressScripts and Walgreen and Cigna merge? Does Apple buy Anthem? It starts to create a domino of some really interesting combinations.”

It’s the acknowledgement that consumers are now making more of their own healthcare decisions, thanks to high-deductible health plans and rising premiums, that will drive industry trends. Companies like CVS or Amazon have brand equity and have experience interacting with consumers in a way that health insurers and providers don't.
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Overcoming the barriers to greater use of mobile technology in healthcare

Overcoming the barriers to greater use of mobile technology in healthcare | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
For many of us, the idea of navigating daily life without a smartphone or tablet computer has become unthinkable. And yet, while on the up, such technology has not yet achieved ubiquitous status in healthcare settings. Claire Read reports on new Digital Health Intelligence research exploring why that is, and how barriers to greater use of mobile technology in healthcare might be overcome.

You’re walking down the street and spy someone coming towards you, but it’s very clear they haven’t spied you. Their eyes are cast downwards, at a shiny rectangular object in their hand. And they can’t even hear your footsteps, what with the music blaring from the distinctive white earbuds dangling from their ears.

If it feels like the vast majority of the people you encounter are obsessed with their phone, then that’s because they probably are. According to research by UK telecommunications regular Ofcom, three quarters of UK adults now own a smartphone, and almost 60% have a tablet computer. And that near-ubiquity of mobile devices is, undoubtedly, impacting healthcare.

Upwardly mobile

In recent years, Digital Health has reported extensively on the growth of healthcare apps targeted directly at patients or the general public more broadly. And with software like e-observations systems – through which nurses enter vital signs data onto a mobile device rather than paper – or with systems that allow community nurses to access records electronically, the impact is being felt in healthcare itself.

It is equally clear, however, that there are barriers to fuller uptake of mobile technology in the care sector. A common – and understandable – refrain is that the NHS has not yet been transformed by mobile devices and connectivity to the same extent as other areas. Indeed, one global digital exemplar is expressly stating its aim is to use technology to become more like easyJet.
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Novartis and Biocon partner on ‘next wave’ of biosimilars

Novartis and Biocon partner on ‘next wave’ of biosimilars | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Novartis and Biocon, which have each had success developing biosimilars on their own, will now see what they can do together. The two have formed a partnership to produce “next generation” biosimilars.

They announced the collaboration today saying they would share the costs equally for developing and commercializing multiple biosimilars in immunology and oncology. Sandoz, the generics unit of Novartis, will market them in the U.S., Canada and most of Europe, while India’s Biocon will take the rest of the world.

They said the partnership is an important part of their strategy to address the “next wave of biosimilar opportunities globally.”

“Together, we will be able to realize benefits at every stage of the value chain, from development, through manufacturing to commercialization," Carol Lynch, global head of biopharmaceuticals at Sandoz, said in a statement.

Both companies were early to biosimilars, with Novartis’ Zarxio, a copy of Amgen's blockbuster Neupogen, becoming the first biosimilar approved by the FDA. Last summer, Sandoz won EU approval for a biosimilar of Roche’s big-selling cancer drug Rituxan.

Biocon and its partner Mylan last month became the first drugmakers to win FDA approval of a biosimilar of Roche's blockbuster cancer drug Herceptin, a drug that raked in $2.5 billion in U.S. 2016 sales. It also has had success with insulin copies, winning a 2016 approval in Japan for its version of the world’s top-selling insulin, Sanofi’s Lantus.

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Facebook to fight “Engagement Bait” – is your pharma brand doing it?

Facebook to fight “Engagement Bait” – is your pharma brand doing it? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Since the beginning of social media times, page administrators have looked for ways to lure audiences to engage with their content in hopes of making it “go viral”. Facebook will soon begin cracking down on what it calls “engagement bait” in an attempt to foster more authentic engagement.

Just like you, Facebook really doesn’t like spammy posts. Their latest newsroom statement is making this clear: “engagement bait” posts are going down. Facebook defines “engagement bait” as spammy posts that actively try to drum up likes, clicks, and shares. These posts include vote baiting, react baiting, share baiting, tag baiting, and comment baiting.

Facebook engagement bait examples
Is your brand guilty of engagement bait?

If your brand has a significant presence on Facebook, now might be a good time to do an audit of your content strategy. Engagement bait posts have been commonly used for a while so chances are that the use of these now frowned about tactics may have already been brought to your attention. Or, you may have a post or two using these tactics currently in circulation. If you do, there’s still time to act.

“We will roll out this Page-level demotion over the course of several weeks to give publishers time to adapt and avoid inadvertently using engagement bait in their posts.” – Facebook rep
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Can Snapchat’s rumored 3-second unskippable ads work for pharma?

Can Snapchat’s rumored 3-second unskippable ads work for pharma? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

The door to Snapchat may be opening a bit wider for pharma marketers. That’s because Snapchat is reportedly exploring unskippable three-second video ads that could serve as a gateway for more pharma to reach the elusive millennial and Gen Z audience on that social media, experts say.

There are caveats—most importantly, will Snapchat go through with the plan? Advertising Age, which first reported the potential change, says it’s under “serious consideration.”

And if Snapchat does implement these three-second video ads, the next big question for pharma is this: What kind of advertising can be done in just three seconds? Pharma would be limited to unbranded ads, no question. There's just not enough time for the required lists of risks and benefits of a particular drug. Reminder ads could be an option, but those would only work for the small number of drug brands with big-time name recognition.

“If Snapchat does this and it’s agreeable from a cost perspective, I do see some aggressive pharma companies going after this, more than likely with unbranded ads,” said Doug Weinbrenner, VP of engagement strategy at FCB Health agency Area 23.

"The demographic that’s on Snapchat has been a very desired demographic for pharma and will continue to be in 2018," Weinbrenner said in an interview. "Pharma companies have had a harder time figuring out how to engage with them, and by them, I mean older millennials, Gen X and maybe younger millennials as well.”

Unbranded ads for conditions that affect those younger age groups—such as hemophilia, multiple sclerosis and HIV—could see success on Snapchat, he said. Over-the-counter drugs and cosmeceutical brands, including those in Big Pharma’s consumer divisions, might also resonate with Snapchatters.

To evaluate whether the rumored ads might work, Brad Einarsen, Klick Health senior director, social media, said pharma should start investigating.

“First, pharma companies should ask, 'Is my target market appropriate for Snapchat?'—and some pharma companies are looking at that now," Einarsen said in an interview. "If yes, should I do a test and see if I get ROI? Then inside that test is this three-second rule which might change the results."

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3D printing drugs: more precise, more personalised

3D printing drugs: more precise, more personalised | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Printing out your own medicines is a long way off, but the possibilities are truly exciting

Imagine a future where patients with multiple chronic conditions no longer have to take numerous drugs several times a day – instead they can take one tablet containing all the required medications, once-daily, thanks to 3D printing.

Known as additive manufacturing, 3D printing starts with a computer-aided design of a digital model of the product. The design is then sliced into thousands of horizontal layers that will form the digital file for feeding into a 3D printer. It will then use different materials to print the product layer by layer, transforming two-dimensional layers into a 3D product. Although the technology was developed in the 1980s, it is only in the last decade or so that 3D printing has found widespread industrial applications, from the production of automotive parts to machine tools. In the healthcare arena, the medical device industry is amongst the first to utilise 3D printing, producing hearing aids, dental implants and prostheses. The pharmaceutical industry is a laggard but is now waking up to the potential that 3D printing has to offer.

Precision and personalised medicines

The ability of 3D printing to produce medications to exact specifications tailored to the needs of individual patients has led some observers to predict the advent of more precision and personalised medicines. The technology allows tablets to be precisely printed in shapes, sizes and textures which are difficult to produce using traditional production techniques. It can print tablets which aid swallowing, have different release rates and possess taste and appearances acceptable to children, thus improving adherence. For example, a pyramidal shaped tablet will be absorbed quicker than a cylindrical one.
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iThermonitor : A New Non-invasive Continuous Way to Monitor Core Temperature for Surgery Patients 

iThermonitor : A New Non-invasive Continuous Way to Monitor Core Temperature for Surgery Patients  | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

A wearable thermometer (iThermonitor) with FDA 510(k) clearance, developed by a TMCx team—Raiing Medical—has enabled core temperature monitoring for surgery patients in a new non-invasive way in operating rooms. The findings appear in a new study published in the Anesthesia & Analgesia.

There are 80 million surgery patients on annual bases in United States, whose temperatures need to be maintained within normal limits perioperatively to avoid complications including surgical bleeding, wound infection, slow post-anesthetic recovery, and prolonged hospitalization. “Optimal patient care thus requires accurate temperature measurements throughout the perioperative period. However, the most accurate sites for measurement of core temperature are also the most invasive. There is thus a role for noninvasive methods.” says the study’s senior author Daniel I. Sessler, MD, who is the Michael Cudahy Professor and Chair at Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Outcomes Research. “Axillary temperature, as recorded by the iThermonitor, well represents core temperature in adults having non-cardiac surgery and thus appears suitable for clinical use.”


Via Annick Valentin Smith
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NeuroMetrix, GSK ink development deal for Quell wearable pain-relief tech

NeuroMetrix, GSK ink development deal for Quell wearable pain-relief tech | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Shares in NeuroMetrix (NSDQ:NURO) soared this morning after the company announced it would partner with GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE:GSK) to expand development of NeuroMetrix’s Quell wearable pain-relief device.

According to the terms of the deal, GSK’s consumer healthcare business will have exclusive rights to the Quell system for markets outside of the U.S., while NeuroMetrix will retain ownership of the device within the U.S.

GSK and NeuroMetrix plan to co-fund further development of Quell for three years, beginning this year. GSK is slated to pay $5 million upfront and up to $21.5 million down the road, contingent upon certain development and commercialization milestones.

“We are excited by the opportunity to partner with GSK consumer healthcare to expand access to Quell technology among chronic pain sufferers around the world. GSK consumer healthcare is a world leader in over-the-counter pain relief, with several top global brands,” Dr. Shai Gozani, president & CEO of NeuroMetrix, said in prepared remarks.

“We will continue to focus on building Quell into a leading U.S. consumer healthcare brand while collaborating with GSK on Quell product development and supporting their international commercialization efforts. We believe that GSK is our ideal Quell partner as we share a deep commitment to science-based therapies and to the health and quality of life of our customers.”
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Advanced Data Analytics and Machine Learning in Healthcare Cybersecurity

Advanced Data Analytics and Machine Learning in Healthcare Cybersecurity | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Cybersecurity has become a major issue in the past couple of years, with the frequency and severity of attacks on organizations around the world steadily rising. The healthcare industry made headlines and became acknowledged as a public target in early 2016 when aHollywood hospital decided to pay $17,000 in bitcoin after hackers hit them with ransomware.

Since then, it’s only gotten worse. The WannaCry virus, which hit the scene Spring of 2017 apparently infected over 220,000 computers around the world, and DDoS attacks have shut down sites and whole parts of in the internet for extended amounts of time.

Shockingly, Rejiv Leventhal writing for healthcare-informatics.com reports that 9 in 10 C-suite executives still haven’t made cybersecurity a talking point with their boards.

“For the survey, Black Book researchers polled more than 300 strategic decision makers in U.S. healthcare organizations, including both providers and payers,” writes Leventhal. “When it comes to payers, 31 percent said they have an established manager for cybersecurity programs currently, with 44 percent planning to recruit a candidate in 2018… The survey revealed that the healthcare industry continues to underestimate security threats as attackers continue to seek data and monetary gain…”

Not only do healthcare administrators need to begin taking cybersecurity more seriously, they need to make sure to focus on measures that actually work. Big data and advanced analytics have proven effective technologies in healthcare already, and may just be the answer for administrator’s IT cybersecurity needs.
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