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Digital, Apps, IoT, devices, AI / DL (...) innovations for Health and Healthcare
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Artificial Intelligence in healthcare – what does the NHS workforce think?

Artificial Intelligence in healthcare – what does the NHS workforce think? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

A new survey of NHS staff reveals that while there remains a difference between the level of enthusiasm for AI between senior managers and other respondents of the survey, overall the majority view it as positive.

Digital transformation has been the recent focal point in the discussion surrounding healthcare, and with AI at the forefront, continuously popping up as an example of ways the NHS could achieve its aims stated in the Five Year Forward View.

The tech focused Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, announced an investment of £400 million in tech transformation and supported AI as providing “huge opportunities to improve patient outcomes and to make life easier for staff.” The Prime Minister herself has even spoken at length about AIs potential improve health provision in the UK.

However, AI not only provides opportunities to the NHS, it is also draws our attention to the areas where the NHS needs improving. The House of Lords Select Committee report ‘AI in the UK: Ready, willing and able?’ showed that obtaining applicable data from other organisations remains the most significant barrier to adoption of AI and could force the implantation to stand still whilst other changes are made.

This leave us with one question, what does the NHS workforce think?

While the adoption of AI in aiding the NHS to deliver healthcare is a priority of the Department and its Secretary, a survey by Dods Research reveals the NHS workers attitudes to AI and how organisations use it.

The survey had 1,019 respondents including 700 individuals working for NHS Trusts, 47 for clinical commissioning groups, and 31 from NHS England. In terms of roles, approaching 200 respondents were senior managers, heads of services, directors or chief executives and over 300 were clinicians.

The survey revealed a noticeable gap between those that see potential in AI and those that have plans to implement it within their organisations. Over 60% of respondents having no plans for using AI, as opposed to a mere 6% of respondents from each cohort that had been utilising it in their organisations.

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Sensors to Smartphones Bring Patent Wars to Diabetes Monitoring

Sensors to Smartphones Bring Patent Wars to Diabetes Monitoring | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Diabetes treatment has evolved since Mary Fortune was diagnosed in 1967 and hospitalized because there was no reliable way monitor her blood sugar. These days, a glucose skin patch transmits her levels day and night to her iPhone and shares the data with others.

Fortune and other diabetics are benefiting from an explosion in technology and innovation, from under-the-skin sensors that eliminate the need for painful finger pricks, to smartphone alerts when glucose levels rise too high. But the technology, and its integration with mobile devices, has brought the types of lawsuits typically seen by Silicon Valley companies.

For glucose monitors alone, the number of published patent applications has grown steadily for a decade and has accelerated significantly since 2015, according to an analysis by the research firm Patinformatics. More than 880 patent applications related to glucose monitoring have been published so far this year, said Tony Trippe, managing director of the Dublin, Ohio-based company.

“Everybody in the market is realizing there’s an enormous opportunity there,” said Paul Desormeaux, a senior analyst with Toronto-based Decision Resources Group. “Other players are starting to come in, and there’s a lot of competition to make advanced products.”

The boom is driven by a variety of factors, Desormeaux said. The number of people with diabetes in the U.S. is rising -- the Centers for Disease Control estimates more than 100 million Americans are now living with diabetes or prediabetes. Insurance coverage for new devices has increased, and there’s a growing number of partnerships between health companies and traditional technology firms such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp., and Fitbit Inc.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 14, 12:31 AM

Diabetes treatment has evolved since Mary Fortune was diagnosed in 1967 and hospitalized because there was no reliable way monitor her blood sugar. These days, a glucose skin patch transmits her levels day and night to her iPhone and shares the data with others.

Fortune and other diabetics are benefiting from an explosion in technology and innovation, from under-the-skin sensors that eliminate the need for painful finger pricks, to smartphone alerts when glucose levels rise too high. But the technology, and its integration with mobile devices, has brought the types of lawsuits typically seen by Silicon Valley companies.

For glucose monitors alone, the number of published patent applications has grown steadily for a decade and has accelerated significantly since 2015, according to an analysis by the research firm Patinformatics. More than 880 patent applications related to glucose monitoring have been published so far this year, said Tony Trippe, managing director of the Dublin, Ohio-based company.

“Everybody in the market is realizing there’s an enormous opportunity there,” said Paul Desormeaux, a senior analyst with Toronto-based Decision Resources Group. “Other players are starting to come in, and there’s a lot of competition to make advanced products.”

The boom is driven by a variety of factors, Desormeaux said. The number of people with diabetes in the U.S. is rising -- the Centers for Disease Control estimates more than 100 million Americans are now living with diabetes or prediabetes. Insurance coverage for new devices has increased, and there’s a growing number of partnerships between health companies and traditional technology firms such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp., and Fitbit Inc.

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Medical device and digitalisation: How to choose a software partner

Medical device and digitalisation: How to choose a software partner | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
In the age of digitalisation, technology demand grows daily even in highly conservative areas. Smart medical devices and enhanced medical software products such as the AI-powered insulin pump or Embody’s pre-operative planning software allow a seamless user experience, reduce risk and apply new approaches such as AI or VR to help reduce the cost of diagnosis.

Many medical device companies are now at the beginning of their digitalisation journey. Some of these manufacturers historically have no software technology capabilities in-house. At the same time, there are also niche startups in the industry, which are founded by doctors who are struggling with software development expertise and resources.

While the option of building an in-house technology department could still be considered, this approach requires significant upfront investment and can extend time-to-market. Therefore, involving a technology partner may be a solution that will offer the required expertise and resources for the long-term journey towards digitalisation.

According to ISO 13485 and ISO 9000-family standards, a manufacturer should control the outsourced processes and remain responsible for them. Therefore, if you are a chief information officer (CIO) of a medical device manufacturer and you’re just starting out on the journey of selecting a software technology partner, you will need to perform due diligence on companies you consider working with. Alongside some of the obvious points like technology expertise and cost estimates, here are a couple of other things to consider as part of the selection criteria
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Healthcare consumerism 2018: An update on the journey

Healthcare consumerism 2018: An update on the journey | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

McKinsey’s latest healthcare consumer research suggests that consumer engagement can improve care access, quality, and affordability. But to be successful, it requires true collaboration.

McKinsey’s 2017 Consumer Health Insights (CHI) Survey yielded several findings with important implications for health insurers, providers, and other industry stakeholders.1 Four important themes emerged:

- Affordability. The affordability of healthcare continues to be one of the most pressing consumer concerns and needs
- Continuity. Many consumers lack continuity in their healthcare ecosystem (e.g., in care delivery or health insurance)
- Digital. An increasing number of consumers are using digital healthcare tools, and interest in greater digital engagement continues to rise
- Engagement. Consumers are willing to engage in solutions to reduce healthcare costs, but most believe that they cannot do so today

These findings and their implications are discussed in detail below. Together, the findings deliver a clear message: Consumers want more from the healthcare industry. When survey respondents were asked what would make a healthcare company “the best,” coverage was ranked as most important (23%), followed by customer service (11%), cost (7%), and access (6%). Such basic “asks” would be unheard of in most industries. In fact, when the respondents were queried about which companies healthcare organizations should aspire to be like, they selected tech-focused innovators such as Amazon, Google, and Apple, as well as high-performing retailers (e.g., Chick-fil-A and Walmart). The types of interactions and relationships consumers have with these companies strongly suggest what they want from healthcare organizations.

Given how personal health is, healthcare organizations are uniquely positioned to become the companies consumers identify as the leading consumer enterprises. As of today, however, these organizations have a long way to go.

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Protection des données de santé : trois défis pour les hôpitaux

Protection des données de santé : trois défis pour les hôpitaux | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Le secteur de la santé publique a besoin d’un réseau unifié pour améliorer la qualité des services proposés aux patients sur l’ensemble du territoire. Mais cela pourrait poser des problèmes en matière de cybersécurité.

Selon une étude conduite récemment par le Clusif ( Club de la sécurité de l'information français ), 92 % des établissements de santé déclarent avoir formalisé une politique de sécurité du système d’information (PSSI), contre 50 % en 2014. Une augmentation importante qui répond aux exigences du Groupement Hospitalier des Territoires (GHT), qui pousse les institutions médicales vers la convergence de leurs systèmes d’information.

Le secteur de la santé publique a besoin d’un réseau unifié pour améliorer la qualité des services proposés aux patients sur l’ensemble du territoire, ainsi que pour améliorer l’efficacité opérationnelle des hôpitaux. Toutefois, l’initiative présente certaines problématiques du point de vue de la cybersécurité. En effet, plus l’infrastructure informatique est grande, plus la surface d’attaque est élevée. Trois principaux risques menacent ainsi le secteur de la santé publique, après l’adoption d’un SI unifié.


1. Vulnérabilité accrue des données médicales

Les dossiers médicaux électroniques (DME) sont essentiels aux établissements de santé qui doivent être capables de fournir des services sécurisés à leurs patients. Cependant, ils ont également un grand intérêt pour les pirates informatiques, qui peuvent prendre les données en otage ou les vendre sur le marché noir. Lorsque des hôpitaux rejoignent un réseau, il est possible que l’un d’entre eux devienne un maillon faible et qu’il compromette alors tous les autres établissements.

Les risques d’attaques de type ransomware restent élevés, même pour les hôpitaux indépendants. Un hôpital compromis ne peut pas faire le choix de perdre des données médicales, car il a une responsabilité envers les patients. Il est donc fort probable qu’il paie la rançon. En effet, si le ransomware vise le réseau central, tous les patients peuvent perdre l’accès aux services médicaux. Face à un risque de rupture de service aussi élevé, les pirates se permettent d’exiger des montants très élevés, et ce sans donner aucune garantie de décryptage.

Une autre façon de tirer parti des DME est de les rendre disponibles sur le marché noir. Plus les données sont détaillées, plus leur valeur est élevée : les prix oscillent entre 100 et 1 000 euros par personne. La situation est particulièrement préoccupante avec l’augmentation de l’utilisation de l’IoT en télémédecine. Ces équipements génèrent des quantités massives de données sur l’état de santé d’un individu et les envoient vers le cloud. Si des hôpitaux stockent des données issues d’objets connectés, ils deviennent automatiquement des cibles privilégiées pour les pirates informatiques.

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Achieving better patient outcomes with artificial intelligence

Achieving better patient outcomes with artificial intelligence | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Nurse Florence Nightingale may be most well-known as the British Army’s lady with the lamp, assiduously conducting night rounds and attending to the wounded by candle light.

But by demonstrating the link between poor sanitary conditions and high mortality rates in hospitals, it was her pioneering use of data collection and visualisation that still resonates today.

In 2018, medicine faces a different set of challenges, with longer life expectancies and population growth increasing the number of patients suffering with chronic conditions requiring ongoing care.

This has led to the cost of delivering health care increasing faster than GDP and quickly becoming unsustainable.

Transforming delivery with data

Over 160 years might have passed since Florence Nightingale’s day, but addressing these challenges still depends on data. By using it to unlock valuable insights, there’s an incredible opportunity to both accelerate medical breakthroughs and improve patient care.

Over the past decade, a great deal of focus has been on digitizing the sector’s records. But while this has been a success improving performance from an operational standpoint, we’ve yet to see it really transform the way we deliver services to patients. At present, health is data rich and information poor.

By applying cognitive technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) to this data, the sector can shift from traditional reactive treatments to a more proactive health system based on prevention, wellness, faster diagnosis and precision medicine.

The VP, Enterprise Research at analyst firm CCS Insight, Nicholas McQuire, sees AI “radically transform the health care industry over the next five years. AI will bring important improvements in operational effectiveness, care delivery and above all, patient outcomes. It will also be a vital tool in helping solve some of our most challenging health-related problems, not least how to balance restricted budgets and reduced workforces against the growth of chronic conditions.”

Providing personalized treatment

Evolving approaches to cancer illustrate the way in which AI can revolutionise health care across the whole sector.

Historically considered an acute terminal illness, medical knowledge is improving to the point where most cancers are classified as highly treatable conditions. That said, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) between 30 and 50 percent of cancer deaths could be avoided with prevention, early detection and treatment.

With the total economic impact of cancer costing the global economy over an estimated $1.16 trillion a year, we’re increasingly turning to the power of AI to address this issue, with oncology one of the most advanced areas of precision medicine.
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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 10, 2:00 PM
In 2018, medicine faces a different set of challenges, with longer life expectancies and population growth increasing the number of patients suffering with chronic conditions requiring ongoing care.

This has led to the cost of delivering health care increasing faster than GDP and quickly becoming unsustainable.

Transforming delivery with data

Over 160 years might have passed since Florence Nightingale’s day, but addressing these challenges still depends on data. By using it to unlock valuable insights, there’s an incredible opportunity to both accelerate medical breakthroughs and improve patient care.

Over the past decade, a great deal of focus has been on digitizing the sector’s records. But while this has been a success improving performance from an operational standpoint, we’ve yet to see it really transform the way we deliver services to patients. At present, health is data rich and information poor.

By applying cognitive technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) to this data, the sector can shift from traditional reactive treatments to a more proactive health system based on prevention, wellness, faster diagnosis and precision medicine.

The VP, Enterprise Research at analyst firm CCS Insight, Nicholas McQuire, sees AI “radically transform the health care industry over the next five years. AI will bring important improvements in operational effectiveness, care delivery and above all, patient outcomes. It will also be a vital tool in helping solve some of our most challenging health-related problems, not least how to balance restricted budgets and reduced workforces against the growth of chronic conditions.”

Providing personalized treatment

Evolving approaches to cancer illustrate the way in which AI can revolutionise health care across the whole sector.

Historically considered an acute terminal illness, medical knowledge is improving to the point where most cancers are classified as highly treatable conditions. That said, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) between 30 and 50 percent of cancer deaths could be avoided with prevention, early detection and treatment.

With the total economic impact of cancer costing the global economy over an estimated $1.16 trillion a year, we’re increasingly turning to the power of AI to address this issue, with oncology one of the most advanced areas of precision medicine.
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Samsung commits billions of dollars to building its biologics business

Samsung commits billions of dollars to building its biologics business | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Samsung has already spent billions of dollars in short order to establish one of the largest biologics manufacturing operations in the world. On Wednesday, it said it will spend billions more.

While short on details, the South Korean conglomerate announced plans to invest $22 billion across business lines it said will propel its growth in the futurer, including artificial intelligence, auto electronics and biopharmaceuticals.

"For biopharmaceuticals, Samsung has seen strong growth from both its contract manufacturing and biosimilar businesses. It will continue to invest heavily in the businesses, including developing and manufacturing biosimilars to combat chronic and difficult-to-cure diseases.”

Its Samsung BioLogics unit established its CDMO and biosimilars business quickly after Samsung decided it was a viable extension of its chemicals business. It has pledged to become the top biologics contract manufacturer in the world and is in the process of completing a third biologics plant at a site in Incheon next to two others—a feat accomplished in seven years.

With completion of the third facility, the company will have total capacity of 362,000 liters and will have invested 3 trillion won ($2.6 billion), in the massive buildup.

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Accompagner les chirurgiens face au virage numérique

Accompagner les chirurgiens face au virage numérique | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

ASSPRO Conseil et le cabinet Branchet lancent un appel à candidature pour accompagner les chirurgiens face au virage numérique

Depuis 5 ans, l’accélération du développement des technologies en santé bouscule les pratiques médicales et la gestion de la relation entre médecins et patients. Ces outils numériques constituent une vraie chance pour les professionnels de santé dans la gestion du temps et de l’organisation du suivi des patients.

Fondapro, Fondation pour la prévention du risque opératoire a réalisé une enquête auprès de 9 647 chirurgiens et anesthésistes-réanimateurs sur la chirurgie de demain, qui a révélé que les domaines dans lesquels la technologie a le plus d’impact sont la pratique chirurgicale (44,8%) suivie par la communication et la coordination avec les équipes de soins (9,5%).

Le 31 mai dernier, à l’occasion, du congrès e-Health World à Monaco, ASSPRO Conseil et le cabinet Branchet ont rendu officiel leur nouveau projet d’accompagnement des praticiens libéraux chirurgiens, anesthésistes-réanimateurs face au virage numérique grâce à la création d’un « Store » dédié aux services et outils digitaux impactants pour les praticiens libéraux : l’ASSPRO STORE.

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Diagnostiquer le cancer du sein grâce aux technologies 3D

Diagnostiquer le cancer du sein grâce aux technologies 3D | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Une équipe de chercheurs de la Food and Drug Administration (FDA) du Maryland aux Etats-Unis a annoncé le développement d’un nouvel outil logiciel d’impression 3D qui aiderait à la création de fantômes mammaires imprimés en 3D. Ces modèles, entièrement adaptés à la morphologie de la patiente, pourraient améliorer la détection et le traitement du cancer du sein.

Selon le Cancer Research au Royaume-Uni, plus de 90% des femmes qui sont diagnostiquées avec un cancer du sein à un stade le plus précoce survivent à la maladie pendant au moins 5 ans. Cela est notamment dû à l’utilisation de fantômes du sein à la place de tissus mammaires; ils sont utilisés pour tester les dispositifs de mammographie pour mieux diagnostiquer et soigner le cancer. Grâce aux technologies 3D, il semblerait que des chercheurs américains aient créé des solutions sur mesure, plus adaptées à la morphologie de chaque patiente. Une initiative qui fait écho aux prothèses mammaires imprimées en 3D par l’entreprise sud-africaine iMedTech Group.

Des modèles 3D imprimés en 3D pour mieux détecter le cancer du sein

Les chercheurs américains expliquent qu’ils ont mis au point un logiciel open source capable de créer des fantômes imprimés en 3D. Ils pourraient reproduire la variabilité anatomique des seins réels, y compris les densités variables, les structures hétérogènes, les distorsions architecturales et les lésions bénignes et malignes.

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iGlucose Integrates with Validic's Data Connectivity Platform to Simplify Diabetes Management

iGlucose Integrates with Validic's Data Connectivity Platform to Simplify Diabetes Management | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Smart Meter, LLC, makers of the iGlucose® Cellular Diabetes Care Solution, announced its integration with Validic, a healthcare data connectivity platform. The integration brings a simple, convenient and affordable diabetes management solution to people with diabetes, healthcare teams, and population management programs.

The iGlucose solution, which uses cell-enabled technology to automatically transmit real-time blood glucose results, removes complex technology issues by automatically transmitting real-time blood glucose (BG) results that can be viewed and acted on by a healthcare team.

With the integration of iGlucose into the Validic platform, health systems and corporate wellness leaders can now offer an effective diabetes management program that fits easily into busy lives. When an iGlucose user checks their blood glucose, the healthcare team can receive near real-time, actionable data and has the information to confidently treat their patients.
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Three Huge Ways Tech Is Overhauling Healthcare

Three Huge Ways Tech Is Overhauling Healthcare | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

We are on the brink of a revolution in healthcare. AI is making the drug discovery process >100X faster and cheaper, and 90 percent more likely to succeed in clinical trials. Mobile health is predicted to become a $102 billion market by 2022, putting a virtual doctor, on-demand, in your back pocket. And the cost of sequencing your genome (3.2 billion base pairs) has decreased 100,000-fold over 13 years, a staggering speed that is 3 times faster than the rate of Moore’s Law.

But humans have barely scratched the surface. As exponential technologies explode onto the scene all at once, we are about to witness the unprecedented rise of personalized, ubiquitous, and intelligent healthcare. In this blog, we’ll discuss how converging exponential technologies are enabling:

1. Personalized medicine
2 .Delocalized (“everywhere”) care
3. The new era of intelligent prevention

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The Impact of Big Data In Healthcare Analytics Career

The Impact of Big Data In Healthcare Analytics Career | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
The global healthcare system is poised at the brink of a data-driven revolution to deliver value-centric care that is backed by a clear digital and analytics strategy. In an industry that is rich with data flowing from various disparate sources, many challenges crop up when it comes to developing data aggregation and governance policies. According to a report by IBM, big data in healthcare analytics plays a significant role in reducing high-risk healthcare problems and is bringing about a study-based format of prescribing personalized medications to patients. As a result, the healthcare industry is grappling with a massive demand for data science professionals who can leverage patients’ data to drive maximum efficiency. While a multitude of data science courses are churning out skilled data analysts round the clock, let’s take a more in-depth look at how the integration of big data in healthcare analytics is driving the overall efficiency of the industry:
What is healthcare analytics?

Healthcare analytics is an umbrella term that holds different meanings for different stakeholders associated with the healthcare industry. For instance, in the case of health care providers like hospitals, it can mean automating tasks and minimizing diagnosis errors by using image processing to generate x-ray reports and using algorithms to create the first-level diagnosis of patients. For doctors, healthcare analytics has more to do with clinical analytics like data-driven decision making for providing personalized treatments to patients, and also suggestions for the next course of treatment for a particular patient to minimize errors. Similarly, for government organizations, healthcare analytics has more to do with collating various patients’ data to identify patterns of occurrence/recurrence of a particular epidemic.
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Autisme : les Google Glass pour aider dans différentes situations sociales

Autisme : les Google Glass pour aider dans différentes situations sociales | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Des chercheurs ont mis au point une application pour Google Glass permettant aux personnes souffrant d’autisme de mieux interpréter les émotions des personnes qui les entourent.

Les troubles du spectre de l’autisme se caractérisent, entre autre, par des difficultés d’apprentissage social. Des études ont montré que les autistes ne perçoivent que partiellement le visage de ceux qui s’adressent à lui et ne peuvent donc pas capter les émotions de cette personne à travers de ses expressions et la communication non verbale. Cette absence de compréhension des émotions des autres limite drastiquement le développement social de la personne souffrant d’autisme. Les lunettes intelligentes Google Glass pourraient cependant être d’une aide précieuse.

Les Google Glass pour aider les personnes souffrant d’autisme

Des chercheurs ont utilisé un smartphone connecté à des lunettes Google Glass. Avec un logiciel de reconnaissance faciale, les lunettes intelligentes indiquent, en temps réel, les émotions des personnes qui communiquent avec lui. Selon les médecins ayant participé à l’étude : « Les enfants souffrant du trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA) ont montré une carence dans leurs facultés à traiter les visages, comme à distinguer la peur de la surprise et à identifier des émotions plus subtiles. Les enfants ont aussi des difficultés avec l’engagement facial et le contact oculaire. Apprendre cela aux enfants autistes est important pour leur développement social, c’est très lié à l’empathie ».

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Japan plans 10 'AI hospitals' to ease doctor shortages

Japan plans 10 'AI hospitals' to ease doctor shortages | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
The Japanese government is teaming up with businesses and academia to set up hospitals enhanced by artificial intelligence, seeking to allow short-handed doctors to spend more time on patient care while curbing medical spending.

The government is expected to invest more than $100 million in the effort over half a decade, with a target of establishing 10 model hospitals by the end of fiscal 2022. AI will help with tasks from updating patients' charts to analyzing tests and parsing images to help with diagnoses.

The effort aims to address structural challenges to health care, including the chronic lack of doctors and nurses in some areas and rising medical expenses. The initiative will also help make Japan more competitive on the world stage, giving AI development a shot in the arm and helping boost exports of medical equipment.

Three ministries central to the effort -- the education, industry and health ministries -- will recruit participating companies and hospitals this month, targeting AI specialists and medical equipment makers. A basic working framework will be established as early as September, with initial efforts set to focus on cancer patients.

Participants will develop AI-assisted programs that will automatically enter information into patients' medical records based on their conversations with doctors during examinations. That is expected to free doctors to focus on patients and give more time for discussing their conditions.

AI will also be used to parse magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic imaging, as well as analyze blood tests and other information. It will even study patients' DNA to help pick the most appropriate methods of treatment.
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Machine Learning for Nursing - 8 Current Applications

Machine Learning for Nursing - 8 Current Applications | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

With an ongoing nurse shortage in the United States and other areas, startups and global companies have begun developing methods for handling time-consuming responsibilities traditionally held by nurses, ranging from daily operations to diagnosis.

In an effort to give hospitals and healthcare providers insight on how AI is being used in the nursing field, this article aims to answer the following questions:

- How is artificial intelligence and machine learning affecting the field of nursing?
- Should health organizations adopt machine learning technology?

In our research, we have found three areas of nursing where the use of AI seems to be emerging:

- Virtual Nurses
- Robotics
- Record Keeping / Informatics / Operations

We’ll explore use-cases and examples of all three areas, including detailed descriptions of their functions, and video demos when applicable.

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Researchers at Rutgers University develop wearable that can count blood cells, air particles #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Researchers at Rutgers University develop wearable that can count blood cells, air particles #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick claim to have come up with a new wearable that can detect blood cell counts as well as particles in the air. 

 

"Current wearables can measure only a handful of physical parameters such as heart rate and exercise activity," Abbas Furniturewalla, the study's lead author and a former undergraduate researcher in Rutger's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, said in a statement. "The ability for a wearable device to monitor the counts of different cells in our bloodstream would take personal health monitoring to the next level.”

 

The research, which was recently published in Microsystems and Nanoengineering, outlines the device design. Researchers created an arm wearable that includes a microfluidic impedance cytometer on a flexible substrate with a microfluidic biosensor.

 

Through a pin-prick blood sample pipetted into a standard microfluidic PDMS chip, the system is able to count blood cells quicker than the standard of care, the researcher said. The system is also able to transfer data through a circuit to process electrical signals and a micro-controller which can digitize the data and sent it to a Bluetooth module, according to a statement.  

 

Once the system gets the blood cell count, it is then able to transfer the data over to a doctor via a smartphone. 

 

The researchers said that in the future they will continue to test the platform by sampling data as it is being worn during activities. This will allow them to adjust the circuit biosensor design to lessen the effects of motion and “environmental disturbance” on the device. 


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 14, 12:35 AM

Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick claim to have come up with a new wearable that can detect blood cell counts as well as particles in the air. "Current wearables can measure only a handful of physical parameters such as heart rate and exercise activity," Abbas Furniturewalla, the study's lead author and a former undergraduate researcher in Rutger's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, said in a statement. "The ability for a wearable device to monitor the counts of different cells in our bloodstream would take personal health monitoring to the next level.”  The research, which was recently published in Microsystems and Nanoengineering, outlines the device design. Researchers created an arm wearable that includes a microfluidic impedance cytometer on a flexible substrate with a microfluidic biosensor.  Through a pin-prick blood sample pipetted into a standard microfluidic PDMS chip, the system is able to count blood cells quicker than the standard of care, the researcher said. The system is also able to transfer data through a circuit to process electrical signals and a micro-controller which can digitize the data and sent it to a Bluetooth module, according to a statement.   Once the system gets the blood cell count, it is then able to transfer the data over to a doctor via a smartphone. The researchers said that in the future they will continue to test the platform by sampling data as it is being worn during activities. This will allow them to adjust the circuit biosensor design to lessen the effects of motion and “environmental disturbance” on the device.  But it isn’t just blood cells that this wearable is focused on. Researchers said it is also able to count organic and inorganic particles in the air that could contribute to our health. "This would be really important for settings with lots of air pollutants and people want to measure the amount of tiny particles or dust they're exposed to day in and day out,” Mehdi Javanmard, senior author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the School of Engineering, said in a statement. "Miners, for example, could sample the environment they're in."

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Social Media for Optometrists: Finding Content for Your Business Page

Social Media for Optometrists: Finding Content for Your Business Page | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

By now you understand that a strong presence on social media platforms keeps your optometry practice relevant to your younger patient base. But as an independent eyecare practice you might not have all of the time, or resources, to constantly stay on top of a social media presence for your practice.

Although it can be a time consuming challenge to find information that will be relevant and interesting to your followers, it's definitely one worth investing in. We put together a few resources and ideas below that will help you curate content for your practice's social media pages.

Let's start with a few statistics to show you the power of social media:

  • 95% of millennials expect brands to have a Facebook Page.
    • On top of that, 87% of Gen X (30-44 year olds), and even 70% of those aged 45-60 think brands should have a Facebook Page.
  • 41% of people said social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital, or medical facility.
  • 60% of doctors say social media improves the quality of care delivered to patients.

Consumers want to do business with people and companies that they like and can relate to. Social media is your space to develop a voice that builds relationships by providing information that is valuable, informative, relatable, and funny.


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Top 10 Healthcare Startups that will Change the Future

Top 10 Healthcare Startups that will Change the Future | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Advances in data science and artificial intelligence are giving rise to a new wave of healthcare startups that focus on predictive analytics, precision medicine and improved patient care. Growth in the digital health market is anticipated to rise at a CAGR of 13.4% between 2017 and 2025, reaching $536.6 billion by the end of 2025. Here are 10 top healthcare startups (worldwide) that are redefining innovation:

SWORD Health
You no longer have to be physically present for physical therapy — Porto/San Fancisco-based SWORD Health has developed the world’s first AI-powered digital physical therapist. After an assessment of rehabilitation needs, the clinical team prescribes a tailored programme which the patient can take home. A high-precision motion tracker is strapped on to the patient, which wirelessly communicates data to the virtual therapist. The digital therapist is then able to guide the patient through the correct exercises remotely, making sure that they are performed correctly.


Prognos
With the ambitious aim of eradicating disease, Prognos (formerly Medivo) uses AI and advanced data analytics to help predict disease at the earliest. They have a huge laboratory network with access 13 billion patient records, and this data is enriched before AI is applied to it for actionable insights. This registry helps identify patients at risk and develop tailored treatment plans. Prognos also provides a solution for payers, who can use analytics to assess risk populations/members and identify “care gaps”.


Flatiron Health
Flatiron Health is an oncology-focused electronic health records (EHR) company that aims to accelerate cancer research and improve patient care. They offer an EMR system that reduces time and cost, an analytics platform that helps derive relevant insights from data, and a service that screens patients for eligibility for clinical trials. They work with hospitals, community clinics, academics and life sciences companies. Backed by Alphabet, the company was bought over by Roche in early 2018.


Modern Fertility
This San Francisco-based startup offers a fertility hormone test that women can take at home. You just have to take a simple finger-prick test and return it through the mail for a physician-approved report about your hormones and a fertility profile. The company partners with Quest Diagnostics, which has 2000+ centers in the US. Founded by two former Uber and 23andME execs and launched at Y Combinator, the company raised $6 million in May 2018.


DayTwo
California-based DayTwo analyzes your gut microbiome, based on which it offers personalized nutrition advice. You provide a stool sample and a blood test result, the company profiles your gut microbiome at the genetic level, based on which it recommends what foods you should and shouldn’t eat. It secured $12 million funding in 2017 from Johnson & Johnson, Mayo Clinic, and other investors.

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New AI Treatment for Low Back Pain Could Save the UK Billions Each Year

New AI Treatment for Low Back Pain Could Save the UK Billions Each Year | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Low back pain (LBP) is an increasingly widespread and expensive condition worldwide, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) has identified back pain as being the global number one reason for disability. According to the Office for National Statistics back pain accounts for almost 31 million days of work lost in 2013 costing the UK economy £14bn a year – but this could now change thanks to an AI app which launches in the UK, and has significantly reduced the pain intensity of LBP by 40% in a recent clinical study.

An estimated one-third of the UK adult population are affected by LBP each year, most of it unexplained, although some professionals think that it may be worsened by sitting at desks all day, carrying bags and general bad posture as well as by environmental factors like stress.

The Kaia app has been developed by a leading digital therapy company Kaia Health in conjunction with physiotherapists, pain management physicians, orthopaedic surgeons and clinical psychologists. The app has been approved as a Class 1 medical product in the EU, and allows users to self-manage their non-specific back pain which is all cases of back pain that do not require specific treatment – and includes up to 90% of all cases of back pain.

The app uses a multidisciplinary digital approach that offers users education, physiotherapy (including exercises for the lower back and lateral muscles) and psychological strategies (including mindfulness and muscle relaxation). The AI tailors treatment programmes for each user from over 120 exercises, and motion tracking technology ensures that the exercises are performed correctly using a smartphone without the need for additional hardware. Each session lasts for 15 minutes, and can be accessed anywhere 24 hours a day. The app also features a chat function which connects users to a physiotherapist or sport scientist for motivation and exercise-related questions.
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Global views on healthcare in 2018 #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Global views on healthcare in 2018 #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

In the new Ipsos Global Advisor survey, Britons are most positive globally about their healthcare system and - with Spain - have the highest confidence that they get the best treatment.

 

Some of the remarkable findings:

  1. "Consumers’ assessment of the quality of their healthcare varies widely across the 28 countries covered in an Ipsos Global Advisor survey of more than 23,000 adults. Globally, 45% rate the quality of the healthcare they have access to in their country as good, 33% rate it as neither good nor poor and 23% as poor.
  2. Among problems facing healthcare systems, access to treatment/long waiting times is the one consumers around the world are most likely to view as a major concern (selected by 40%), most of all in Poland (70%), Serbia (68%), Hungary (65%) and Chile (64%). Insufficient staffing is the second most cited major problem globally (by 36%), most of all in Sweden (68%), France (67%), Hungary (63%) and Germany (61%). Cost of accessing treatment third most cited problem worldwide (by 32%) – but ranks at #1 in the U.S. (64%), Malaysia (49%), India (44%), Saudi Arabia (32%), and in a statistical tie with other issues in Australia (38%).
  3. Views about the future of healthcare differ widely across countries as optimism prevails in emerging countries (especially China, India, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia and throughout Latin America) while pessimism dominates in many developed countries (especially in Western Europe).
  4. Globally, less than half of all participants agree that the provider they last saw know them as a person (36%), or that they know that doctor very well (37%), or that the doctor showed them emotional support (40%).
  5. Globally, one half (49%) agree they get all the medical care they need while one quarter (24%) disagree and another quarter (27%) neither agree nor disagree.
  6. Globally, cancer ranks as the #1 public health concern with obesity a far second.

Thinking about Telemedicine

  • Globally, only 10% report having ever used telemedicine. Generally speaking, reported experience is far more common in emerging countries of Asia and the Middle East and in the United States than it is in Europe. Among the 10% who have used it, about two thirds say they would use it again and one third say they wouldn’t. Globally, 44% say they haven’t used it but would try it.
  • Globally, 12% say they currently use a connected health device or tool to manage their health, 15% say they have used one, but are not using any now, and 68% say they have never used one – the other 6% do not know. The five countries where usage is highest are the same as with telemedicine: China (28%), India (23%), Saudi Arabia (22%), Malaysia (18%) and the U.S. (15%).

Via rob halkes, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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rob halkes's curator insight, August 8, 9:13 AM

In the perspective on patients/consumers there is still alot to do in getting healthcare right! A conclusion from the recent (2018) global survey of health by Ipsos
"Views about the future of healthcare differ widely across countries as optimism prevails in emerging countries (especially China, India, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia and throughout Latin America) while pessimism dominates in many developed countries (especially in Western Europe)."

Interesting is to see how patients' responses do tell more about their beleifs, then about figures. Where is the global survey that really compare data like from GHO/WHO, EU, IFPMA, OECD, and Global Health 50/50?

More disturbing for scholars on healthcare is the disappointing percentage of people having experience with telemedicine!  

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6 campaigns that drive change in behavior

6 campaigns that drive change in behavior | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

When trying to connect with people, you must first grab their attention. Once you have their attention, you need to understand what motivates them to act. Why? Because telling people to do something is not enough to change how they behave.

Here are some campaigns that use insight into how patients perceive their illness to fuel their creative approach and drive change in behavior.

The Hardest Crossword
Alzheimer's Foundation of America, Area 23

These unsolvable crossword puzzles were published in major newspapers across the country. What works best in this campaign is that, rather than telling you about Alzheimer's disease, it shows what it feels like: confusion, helplessness, and frustration. It's simple, powerful, and relatable.

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Healthcare digital transformation maps the new patient journey

Healthcare digital transformation maps the new patient journey | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

The modern patient experience features flavors of consumerism combined with healthcare data. Giving patients greater access to that information is one area in which technology options thrive.

Asking professionals within the healthcare system to explain what a patient journey looks like these days often yields wildly different responses.

But when technology works well, the core goals of healthcare digital transformation usually blossom and benefit patient care. Those goals include a move from paper and faxed records to electronic versions, such as patient bills; a streamlined process from diagnosis to admission, treatment and discharge; and an emphasis on healthier outcomes for patients.

Although the transition to electronic health records (EHRs) was an important factor in moving health systems forward technologically, Indu Subaiya, M.D., sees healthcare digital transformation more broadly than simply providers ditching paper in favor of EHRs. Digital transformation is more about integrating EHR data with other applications in near real time and making that information available to patients with an easy-access approach. Subaiya is executive vice president of Health 2.0, which produces market research and organizes conferences on new health technologies and is a division of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society.


Automation allows real-time patient control

Subaiya recalled seeing a demonstration in 2017 of a voice-commanded smart speaker, in which a person asked the embedded virtual home assistant, "Can I get a doctor's appointment?" The virtual assistant responded within 30 seconds with appointment times. "And behind the scenes, all the integration with the scheduling system, the voice analytics, the personal health record -- all of that's already been done," Subaiya said.
Indu Subaiya, M.D., executive vice president at Health 2.0Indu Subaiya, M.D.

Meanwhile, for the patient using a smart speaker, "the interface is totally different," she explained. "It's not, 'I have to go onto a website. I then click, I then drop down, I then submit, then I wait.' Which was already much faster than paper, right? So the web did a lot to automate and make things faster. [But this demo was] immediate, and even I was shocked."

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How Artificial Intelligence is Changing Radiology, Pathology

How Artificial Intelligence is Changing Radiology, Pathology | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Artificial intelligence and machine learning tools have the potential to analyze large datasets and extract meaningful insights to enhance patient outcomes, an ability that is proving helpful in radiology and pathology.

Images obtained by MRI machines, CT scanners, and x-rays, as well as biopsy samples, allow clinicians to see the inner workings of the human body. However, these images often contain large amounts of complex data that can be difficult and time consuming for human providers to evaluate.

AI tools can augment the workflow of radiologists and pathologists, acting as clinical decision support and enhancing care delivery.

“There are so many moving pieces when it comes to artificial intelligence,” Keith Dreyer, DO, PhD, Chief Data Science Officer and Corporate Director of Enterprise Medical Imaging at Partners Healthcare, told HealthITAnalytics.com.

“Imaging analytics is a good example of the complexity involved in all different disciplines, as well as the pace of progress that we’re seeing in AI development at large.”

What are the top ways AI will enhance radiology and pathology and lead to better patient care?

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Intelligence artificielle et système de santé : à quoi faut-il s'attendre ?

Intelligence artificielle et système de santé : à quoi faut-il s'attendre ? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Dans le cadre du SAS Forum 2018, une table ronde a été organisée par Pierre-Marie Vidal, Directeur d’Acteurs Publics. Il a réuni le Dr. Gilles Bontemps, Directeur de mission Gestion et Organisation des soins de la CNAM ; Caroline Dunoyer, Responsable de l’Unité de Traitement d’Information Médicale au CHU de Montpellier ; et Antoine Evennou, Chargé de Mission Innovation et Perspectives en Santé à la MGEN (Mutuelle Générale de l’Éducation Nationale) et co-auteur de « La Santé à l’heure de l’intelligence artificielle » pour le think Tank Terra Nova.
Les spécialistes ont particulièrement discutés de l’exploitation et du partage de données des patients. Ces conversations s’insèrent dans le cadre d’une démocratisation des technologies liées à l’intelligence artificielle mais aussi sur le mode de fonctionnement européen vis-à-vis de la protection des données personnelles.


Faut-il partager les données entre professionnels ?

Pierre-Marie Vidal aborde rapidement la question de l’ouverture et du partage de données entre professionnels. Le Dr. Gilles Bontemps estime que pour mener à bien la révolution qui règne au sein de l’utilisation des données dans le système santé, il faut accompagner les différents acteurs et leur fournir les bons outils.
Les professionnels de santé engendrent une multitudes de données. Toutefois, les possibilités pour les exploiter restent minimes. Ainsi, la CNAM a développé une solution de data visualisation qui analyse, structure et hiérarchise l’information pour lui donner sens.


À quelles fins seront-elles utilisées ?

Posséder et comprendre ces données permet de tirer des conclusions quant aux bonnes et mauvaises pratiques au sein du système de santé. De ce fait, les échanges entre collègues se multiplient. Avoir de telles connaissances permet d’améliorer les actes professionnels et organisationnels au sein des établissements de santé dans la prise en charge chirurgicale.
La CNAM lance un outil de data visualisation ouvert à tous

Les questions que suscitent le virage ambulatoire par exemple, c’est à dire une opération chirurgicale sans nuit à l’hôpital, peuvent être éclairées par l’intelligence artificielle. L’outil de data visualisation de CNAM traite les données et compare la totalité des établissements chirurgicaux français, que l’on décompte à plus de 1 000 avec 6 millions de passages et 8 millions d’actes chirurgicaux par an.
Ainsi, l’analytique permet de comparer les statistiques de différents centres et les aide à se perfectionner. Dès septembre 2018, l’outil de la CNAM sera disponible pour tous les professionnels de santé.

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Cancer immunotherapy: What's on the horizon?

Cancer immunotherapy: What's on the horizon? | eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Cancer remains one of the world’s top healthcare challenges, but over the years our ability to treat the disease has dramatically improved. In fact, there is a sense that a new generation of therapies – and particularly those harnessing the power of the immune system – could dramatically extend expected survival and even effect long-term cures in patients.

We are still in the earliest stages of this treatment shift, but there’s no question that we are experiencing a bonanza in new cancer therapies. Between November 2016 and October 2017, the FDA approved 31 new therapies for more than 16 types of tumour, including the first cell-based therapies, the first tumour-agnostic drugs and 13 new targeted medicines that block the growth and spread of cancer by interfering with specific molecular targets. Such is the pace of progress that patients can now be hopeful of getting a clinical response even in early-stage trials.

There’s little doubt immunotherapy is leading the charge at the moment, headed by checkpoint inhibitors that target receptors that inhibit the patient’s own immune response, as well as T-cell-based therapies and oncolytic viruses that attack malignant cells directly, and cancer vaccines that try to kickstart an intrinsic immune reaction to the tumour.

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