E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
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E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
Graduate Certificates, Online Courses, ELearning, Instructional Design, Online Learning  @ UW-Stout
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Rescooped by Maggie Rouman from Online Writing Instruction
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100 Best Video Sites For Educators - Edudemic

100 Best Video Sites For Educators - Edudemic | E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching | Scoop.it

We're showcasing the top 100 video sites for educators to use in their classrooms. Appropriate for a variety of subjects and age levels.


Via Jess Hass, Charles Marvin
Maggie Rouman's insight:

Great resource for educators of all levels!

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Maggie Rouman's comment, June 12, 2016 11:34 AM
Love this resource. I'm scooping this! Helpful for teachers of all levels.
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 15, 2016 9:16 PM
Excellent list of resources. Well organized, too! 
Maggie Rouman's curator insight, June 23, 2016 2:49 PM
Incorporating videos in a PBL/flipped setting goes beyond just using YouTube or Khan Academy videos. What a great list of video sites. Lots of ideas here!
Rescooped by Dennis T OConnor from Techy Stuff
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The 21st-Century Digital Learner

The 21st-Century Digital Learner | E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching | Scoop.it

After hosting dozens of these conversations, I realize one thing: We just don't listen enough to our students. The tradition in education has been not to ask the students what they think or want, but rather for adult educators to design the system and curriculum by themselves, using their "superior" knowledge and experience.


Via Nik Peachey, Patty Ball
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Empowerment with communications technology....

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Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 24, 2013 5:27 PM

Just as speaking is the outcome of listening, so writing is the outcome of reading, not the other way round. Listening to the student should also include "listening" to their writing. ie., analyse what they are saying and how they are doing it.  When students evaluate their own work, the teacher should listen and guide them to ways of improving it, whether it be punctuation, paragraphing, spelling, or word or subject knowledge.  This is how we bring students on board and empower them to learn. 

Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:49 PM

Listening to students has two aspects; listening to what they say orally, and 'listening' to their writing which is only another way of talking, only through a code. Just as learning to speak is tied closely to listening to what is said and being exposed to words that help one to think better, so writing is the same  and relies on reading "or listening" to what others say and how they say it to express clear meaning. The two subjects, reading and writing, are closlely intertwined yet we compartmentalize them in the literacy curriculum. An example of adults thinking they know what is best for children.  

Nuno Ricardo Oliveira's curator insight, December 28, 2013 11:53 AM

The 21st-Century Digital Learner