Dust Bowl Roland
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Dust Bowl Roland
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The Dust Bowl

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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:06 AM
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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:14 AM
the dust bowl is a big dirt cloud that kill many people from the dried land and people could not survive it was also kids going towards school when this had happened,the dust bowl destroyed many things around that area.
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About The Dust Bowl

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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:19 AM
For eight years dust blew on the southern plains. It came in a yellowish-brown haze from the South and in rolling walls of black from the North. The simplest acts of life — breathing, eating a meal, taking a walk — were no longer simple. Children wore dust masks to and from school, women hung wet sheets over windows in a futile attempt to stop the dirt, farmers watched helplessly as their crops blew away.
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THE DUST BOWL: A Film By Ken Burns | Premieres Sun., Nov. 18th | PBS

Witness the catastrophic dust storms, incredible human suffering and equally incredible stories of human perseverance as Ken Burns chronicles our country's w...
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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:07 AM
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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:17 AM
The Dust Bowl lasted about a decade. Much was learned about cultivation in dryland ecosystems. Because of these new cultivation methods, subsequent droughts in this region have had less impact.
The Dust Bowl was a ecological and human disaster that took place in the southwestern Great Plains region of the United States in the 1930's. It was caused by misuse of land and years of sustained drought. Millions of hectares of farmland became useless, and hundreds of thousands of people were forced to leave their homes.
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website topic 3

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THE DUST BOWL chronicles the worst man-made ecological disaster in American history, in which the frenzied wheat boom of the 'Great Plow-Up,' followed by a decade-long drought during the 1930s nearly swept away the breadbasket of the nation.
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Topic website 1 Dust Bowl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought combined with farming methods that did not include crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops, soil terracing and wind-breaking trees to prevent wind erosion.[1] Extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains in the preceding decade had displaced the natural deep-rooted grasses that normally kept the soil in place and trapped moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. Rapid mechanization of farm implements, especially small gasoline tractors and widespread use of the harvester-combine were significant in the decisions to convert grassland (much of which received no more than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year) to cultivated cropland.

During the drought of the 1930s, without natural anchors to keep the soil in place, it dried, turned to dust, and blew away with the prevailing winds. At times, the clouds blackened the sky, reaching all the way to East Coast cities such as New York and Washington, D.C. Much of the soil ended up deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, carried by prevailing winds. These immense dust storms—given names such as "black blizzards" and "black rollers"—often reduced visibility to a few feet (a meter) or less. The Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2), centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, and adjacent parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas.[2]

Millions of acres of farmland were damaged, and hundreds of thousands of people were forced to leave their homes; many of these families (often known as "Okies", since so many came from Oklahoma) migrated to California and other states, where they found economic conditions little better during the Great Depression than those they had left. Owning no land, many became migrant workers who traveled from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages. Author John Steinbeck later wrote The Grapes of Wrath, which won the Pulitzer Prize, and Of Mice and Men, about such people.

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The Dust Bowl

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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:11 AM
This is a primary document about the Dust Bowl. the dust builds up and the dirt and crops and dried grass and when the win picks up it will blow a big storm towards the the houses and the land and there are alot of people that died from it
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Dust Bowl Photographs

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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:16 AM
the dust bowl also started also from the part of having no type of rain for some months or weeks and also form not watering the plants and crops and a that same time of no wate the dirt begins to build up
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Home | THE DUST BOWL

Home | THE DUST BOWL | Dust Bowl Roland | Scoop.it
THE DUST BOWL chronicles the worst man-made ecological disaster in American history, in which the frenzied wheat boom of the 'Great Plow-Up,' followed by a decade-long drought during the 1930s nearly swept away the breadbasket of the nation.
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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:19 AM
The unusually wet period, which encouraged increased settlement and cultivation in the Great Plains, ended in 1930. This was the year in which an extended and severe drought began which caused crops to fail, leaving the plowed fields exposed to wind erosion. The fine soil of the Great Plains was easily eroded and carried east by strong continental winds
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primary document

primary document | Dust Bowl Roland | Scoop.it
Abbie Bright diary - Kansas Memory
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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:07 AM
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Roland Collier's comment, February 25, 2013 9:20 AM
The Dust Bowl of the 1930s lasted about a decade. Its primary area of impact was on the southern Plains. The northern Plains were not so badly effected, but nonetheless, the drought, windblown dust and agricultural decline were no strangers to the north. In fact the agricultural devastation helped to lengthen the Depression whose effects were felt worldwide. The movement of people on the Plains was also profound.