During Vietnam
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Top 5 Movies of 1940

Here's the list of the top movies of 1940.

Jen Greenwich's insight:

The Grapes of Wrath- released January 24, 1940. 117 minutes

The Grapes of Wrath tells the story of an Oklahoma farming family, The Joads. The Joads lost their farm during the Great Depression and became migrant workers. While being migrant workers they moved along to California and faced many hardships finding work.

The Philadelphia Story- released December 26, 1940. 129 minutes.

A wealthy, well known woman, Tracy Samantha Lord Haven recently divorced her husband C.K Dexter Haven because he did not meet her standards. This movie follows the drama that is ensued because of a publisher of Spy Magazine, Sidney Kidd who wants to report on her new wedding. Tracey finds herself torn between her fiancé, Dexter, and the reporter.

Fanastasia- released November 13, 1940. 125 minutes.

Classic movie that contains eight animated segments set to pieces of classical music.

Pinocchio- released February 7, 1940. 88 minutes.

Another classic movie about a wooden puppet brought to life and his journey to becoming a real boy.

Pride and Prejudice – July 26, 1940. 117 minutes.

An adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel with the same title comes along a story of the Bennet family. Mr. and Mrs. Bennet have five daughters and eager to find them husbands, Mrs. Bennet especially. Happiness is very hard for the girls to have with many complications in the relationships. But will they find true love?

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ANTI WAR PROTESTS GROWING DAILY

By: Robert Painter

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            Although the anti-war movement began small, mostly on college campuses and among members of Students for a Democratic Society, it has erupted far past the small teach-ins that were organized by the SDS. Back in 1965, more critics began to question the motives of the war, realizing that the goal of the war was to liberate South Vietnamese people from communist aggression, something having nothing to do with the U.S. This is when the anti-war movement began to gain national prominence to such a point that even veterans spoke out. A group of veterans known as the Vietnam Veterans Against the War have even gathered to publicly destroy their medals won during the war, which has just given the movement even more apparent validity. At this point, only about 35% of U.S. citizens approve of the war, and over 50% disapprove of its handling. Recently, the government has enacted a draft of men 18 years of age or older. Many disagree so strongly with this blatantly forceful method of recruiting soldiers, that they are willing to flee to Canada if drafted and risk being arrested. All in all, the war is a disaster, the people disapprove, and we aren’t accomplishing anything. When will Nixon admit his mistake of keeping our sons, fathers, and brothers in a far off land defending something that has no impact on life here in America?

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The Draft

The Draft | During Vietnam | Scoop.it
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The Draft
Have you been selected to enter the war? If so, don’t sweat it! Entering the war is a brave decision that will change your life. Would you rather be a coward and go on the run, or would you rather fight for the lives of many and be given the chance to become a hero. If you are caught running away from the war, then you will be forced to serve jail time.
Although it is mandatory, the war is not an easy life to live. A variety of tools and equipment will be needed to be carried at all times. Personal items may be carried along with P-38 can openers, pocket knives, heat tabs, wristwatches, dog tags, mosquito repellent, chewing gum, candy, cigarettes, salt tablets, Kool-Aid packets, lighters, matches, sewing kits, Military Payment Certificates, C rations, canteens of water, toothbrush, dental floss, soap, steel helmets, jackets, boots, other clothing, guns, ammunition, explosives, and other optional sources. Training will be needed because it will not be easy to carry hundreds of pounds of equipment everywhere you go.
If you are struggling with money, war is your best bet. Healthcare will be given to you along with free food. Also you will have the chance of getting an education. The war will make you stronger and wealthier than you are when you enter it.
The war is violent and traumatizing. When it is finished, peace could be brought to the world, which in the end is the most important thing we need. Do you have what it takes?
-Tyler Tremblay

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An Interview with Lewis Franks: An Unwilling Drafted Soldier.

An interview with a drafted soldier during the war.

Jen Greenwich's insight:

It’s a Tuesday night, you’re coming home from a long day at the office, and you grab the mail expecting it to be just a bunch of bills and junk mail from local retailers, however there’s one piece of mail that does not look like anything you’ve ever received before. It’s a letter from the military, and you’re being drafted into the war you had zero interest in. This happened to a young local, Lewis Franks. After reading his letter he sent in explaining his case we decided to invite him into the offices before he leaves to fight in The Vietnam War. Turn to page 5, article “Drafted Soldier Interview” to read what he had to say.

 

 

            Us:Hello Lewis, we read your letter and we are utterly shocked by your situation. Care to explain how you’re feeling?

            LF: Thank you for having me. When I received the letter I was confused. I recently just graduated college and landed a job at a local accounting firm, I thought my life was finally picking up. Throughout high school I was always the one picked on, I didn’t have many friends, I had my grades. I wasn’t athletic; I never played any sports in high school nor college, which lead me to be picked on by the jocks. So I didn’t get why they wanted me to do the job of fighting for our country, I don’t know how I’m going to defend for myself.

            Us:That’s horrible it looks like you had a lot of good things going on in your life; did you participate in any activities that may have led to you being drafted in?

            LF: Not at all, I choose to remain neutral during the wars. I don’t get the concept of it to be honest; I’m not really even sure what this war is all about. I don’t get how they found me to be drafted. You would think that I would need to have at least a little consent if I was being called into war. If I wanted to be a soldier I would have signed up to be one, not gone to law school to become a successful lawyer.

That’s unfair. Do you think you have any characteristics that you think will be positive on your journey throughout war?

            LF: Not really. Actually I don’t think I have any at all. Probably the only contribution that would be appreciated from me would be logical, not physical. I think I would be able to come up with different war strategies with my thinking power I am capable of. But this would only be once I’m used to my surroundings and I understand the whole concept of war, and I’m not quite sure if I ever will exactly understand the whole concept behind war. Another thing is they have certain people, in higher positions, which come up with the war plans. I’m being drafted to be a soldier not anything more. Quite honestly, I think that I’m going to be a waste of valuable space that could be occupied by somebody more beneficial. One more thing, I don’t know if I’m ready to even begin to think of the possibility of giving up my life, especially for something I’m not even passionate for.

            Us:Thank you for sharing your personal, inner most thoughts. We appreciate everything you’ve shared with us today. We hope to be able to catch up with you again, maybe once you’re home. Or if you’re interested in writing to us during your experience at war we would love to publish more, following up on your interesting story of you and your unwanted life at war. Please write to us again. Thank you once again for coming in and talking with us.

            LF: You’re welcome. I will follow up with you once I begin my journey, or try to get out of it. I’ll speak with you after. Thanks for having me.

 

By: Jen Greenwich

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POOP

POOP | During Vietnam | Scoop.it
Jen Greenwich's insight:

This is a comic, fully colored and based off the chapter on the rainy river by Tim O'Brien.  i used Microsoft paint to create it.  This is for my English class.  It took me about 20 minutes to make this.  My name is Dan, all credits to me.

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Human Trafficking

by bailey pickett and molly kirk

Jen Greenwich's insight:

 

            A young girl is sold into human trafficking at the age of 6 in Asia, her life is now ruined and she becomes a sex slave. Along with thousands of other girls whose lives are run by their owners, usually middle aged men, and this little girl is not one in a million. There are several reasons why children are forced to be sex slaves. Sometimes they are even sold by their parents. Parents sometimes believe their children will be provided with legitimate work or educational opportunities. Other times, children in poor or abusive families wind up on the streets where they are picked up and forced to work as sex slaves.
            Girls are forced to dress in a provocative ways to seem more attractive to sexually frustrated soldiers. Men interact with them as if they are worthless and good for nothing but sex. If you think you are helping these children by “buying them” you’re not. In one case, a soldier in Vietnam thought he was helping a young girl get away and bought her from her “owner”. When returning to America she ran away because she was afraid that she would become a sex slave in America.
             If you have witnessed human trafficking at the juicy bars or on the streets, please for the sake of their lives don’t participate with this cruel act against poor defenseless children! There is a penalty of 20 years to life in prison goes to anyone convicted of abducting a minor or taking part in any way with human trafficking.

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Pop Culture

Pop Culture during the Vietnam war

Jen Greenwich's insight:

 

            During this time, the Vietnam War, pop culture changed, new movies came out, three Olympic Games were held, all the new fashion fads, and many more.

            Art during the sixties is influenced by the desire to move modern age or future which the age seemed to bloom. Alexander Calder and Helen Frankenthaler are new upcoming artists during this period. They both were interested in doing something different and out there. Artists wanted to inspire and draw their viewers into their work. Another artist that appeared during this time period is Andy Warhol. New forms of art are assemblage art, kinetic abstract, environmental art and pop art.

            Literature is reflected on today’s events and political issues. Books now-a-days had created some turmoil in races and how it affected people in America. Harper Lee had created a Pulitzer Prize winning novel called, To Kill a Mockingbird. To Kill a Mockingbird is about a small southern town with social distinctions between races. Authors will write about women with color, gender, and races to create new insight on the way feminism is in America.  

            College campuses became the center of attention in debates and protests more than ever. During this time it had been more acceptable to be pregnant teacher or the clothes they were able to wear.

            The first fad was the Barbie doll created in 1959 by Mattel. The Barbie doll became a success during the sixties. Mattel’s rivals Hasbro had come up with the G.I. Joe, the first action figure for boys. The troll was also a new creation for both boys and girls.  Now-a-days men wear casual button down plaid shirts, and women wore long knee length dresses that are usually required when going out. Women’s style hair was either really short or long and lanky. Men’s hair had become long and thick and they also grew mustaches. Blacks in both genders wore their hair in an afro.

            The Civil Rights movement had made changes in society. The movement began with Martin Luther King and his speech. Malcolm X had preached about Black Nationalism. Right after his assassination the Black Panthers were formed to continue his mission. In 1965 the Watts riots broke out in Los Angeles. John F. Kennedy took the reins of President. He was soon assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in 1963 his vice president Lyndon B. Johnson took his position as president. 

 

By- Ashley Mikkila 

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Casualties during the Vietnam War

During the Vietnam War

Jen Greenwich's insight:

The casualties during the Vietnam War were extraordinarily high.  The United States saw a staggering amount of life lost during the war, with hundreds of thousands of soldiers affected. About 58, 148 soldiers lost their life during the brutal war and 75,000 more were disabled. The draft claimed many young me under 21 which brings up that 61% of the deaths during the war were from soldiers under 21. 1,875 soldiers went missing to never return or to be accounted for, lost in the everlasting war. The war had a huge mental impact during the war on soldiers. Soldiers had to see horrific images and scenes of people dying right in front of them while they could do nothing but watch.  The CDC has showed that about 9,000 soldiers committed suicide during the war. Young men fought beside old men as they tried not to be shot. They still fought for us day by day even though they knew they could die at any minute. The Vietnamese could have been watching them, waiting for a perfect opportunity to strike. The soldiers fought for our future, our lives, and our respect.            

            When the war ended, the fight just began. When the troops returned home, more Vietnam veterans felt discomfort. Imagine seeing your friends bleed out on the battlefield while you are the one who survived. It was called survivor’s guilt. These soldiers should have felt happy they returned home, the war was over. Instead, all they thought about were those who were lost. They saw them everywhere they went. In all reality, the war never ended the Vietnam veterans. We have gained respect for the veterans but they haven’t gained respect for themselves. Many more committed suicide at home, while many became depressed and worried another war would begin. It wasn’t just a war, it was a death trap. Death was all around and the soldiers fighting knew it was coming for them. At any moment death could come in the form of trench warfare, an ambush, or even friendly fire. The soldiers left the battlefield, but their souls didn’t.

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