Drugs and Addiction
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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Drugs, Society, Human Rights & Justice
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Drug treatment needs to focus more on underlying trauma & life difficulties, says Scottish Drugs Forum research

Drug treatment needs to focus more on underlying trauma & life difficulties, says Scottish Drugs Forum research | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it

Via Julian Buchanan
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

I really agree with this article because if we focused more on the psychological side of addiction, we could probably have a higher success rate of curing the "disease" of addiction.

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Julian Buchanan's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:57 PM

I've spoken and published widely on this issue should you want more free resources:

 

VIDEO: Barriers to Recovery: Exclusion, Stigma & Discrimination

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scoqktXn52Q&autostart=true&height=350&width=474

 

VIDEO: Drug use, institutionalised discrimination and the challenge of reintegration

http://www.fead.org.uk/video241/Julian-Buchanan-on-institutionalised-discrimination-and-the-challenge-of-reintegration.html

 

Buchanan, J. (2006) Understanding Problematic Drug Use: A Medical Matter or a Social Issue, British Journal of Community Justice – Volume 4, Issue 2 pp. 387–397 http://epubs.glyndwr.ac.uk/siru/18/

 

Buchanan J (2004) Missing Links: Problem Drug Use and Social Exclusion, Probation Journal Special Edition on Problem Drug Use Vol 51 No.4 pp.387-397 http://epubs.glyndwr.ac.uk/siru/4/

 

Buchanan J & Young L (2000) ‘The War on Drugs – A War on Drug Users’ in Drugs: Education, Prevention Policy Vol. 7 No.4 2000 pp 409-422 http://epubs.glyndwr.ac.uk/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1022&context=siru

 

Buchanan J & Young L (2000) ‘Examining the Relationship Between Material Conditions, Long Term Problematic Drug Use and Social Exclusion: A New Strategy for Social Inclusion’ in Experiencing Poverty, Bradshaw J, & Sainsbury R (eds) pp. 120-143 http://tinyurl.com/az8vbmf

 

Buchanan J & Young L (2000) ‘Problem Drug Use, Social Exclusion and Social Reintegration – the client speaks' pp155-161 in Greenwood G & Robertson K (eds.) ‘Understanding and responding to drug use: the role of qualitative research EMCDDA http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/html.cfm/index34017EN.html

Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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US Justice Department wants shorter drug sentences to free up prisons

US Justice Department wants shorter drug sentences to free up prisons | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it
In a major shift in criminal justice policy, the Obama administration will move on Monday to ease overcrowding in federal prisons by ordering prosecutors to omit listing quantities of illegal substances in indictments for low-level drug cases,...

Via ReGenUC
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

Even though we are running out of room in our prisons because of drug sentences, I think that some of them are still necessary. For example, if someone has been given plenty of opportunities to go to rehab and stop using illegal substances and they chose not to, they should have to do the time for the crime that they committed. However, if they are going to prison because they have one minor charge for the posession of marijuana, I think that shouldn't be really prison, more like jail time for 10 days or so.

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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Science News
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Scientists finding new uses for hallucinogens and street drugs

Scientists finding new uses for hallucinogens and street drugs | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it
Janeen Delany describes herself as an "old hippie" who's smoked plenty of marijuana. But she never really dabbled in hallucinogens -- until two years ago, at the age of 59.A diagnosis of incurable...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

"In their next incarnation, these drugs may help the psychologically wounded tune in to their darkest feelings and memories and turn therapy sessions into heightened opportunities to learn and heal."


This quote from the article stood out to me a lot. If we can use hallucinogens to help patients learn and heel, I think it would be worth it. However, they would have to monitor the amount given and be careful not to walk on the thin line of addiction. 

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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Drugs, Society, Human Rights & Justice
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11 Facts That Reveal The Insanity Of The Global War [Between] Drugs

11 Facts That Reveal The Insanity Of The Global War [Between] Drugs | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it
11 Facts That Reveal The Insanity Of The Global War On Drugs

Via Julian Buchanan
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

"7. One percent of all heroin smuggled into the UK is seized by border police."

 

This quote stood out to me a lot in the article. Looking at how much money the society of UK spends on drug related issues, and they still only seize 1% of heroin smuggled. I think that if this is the case, they should be focusing that effort elsewhere, like inside the borders where their efforts and money would probably have a better payoff.

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Julian Buchanan's curator insight, December 3, 2013 4:44 PM

Amazing but depressing facts

Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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South Korean Politicians Want Video Games Placed Alongside Drugs And Alcohol In Legislation For Addiction | Techdirt.com

South Korean Politicians Want Video Games Placed Alongside Drugs And Alcohol In Legislation For Addiction | Techdirt.com | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it

As you should know by now, there are people in this world that think an addiction to the internet and/or video games is a thing. As in, a real thing, a real disorder. This, despite all the evidence that there is no such disorder and that video games are no more addictive than work or school. But scaring the hell out of people with official-sounding terminology makes for great business, leading to care-givers and hospitals opening up entirely new practices for treating these heretofore unproven "diseases."

However, lest you think that fact-less platforms are the exclusive realm of the medical profession, take a look at how some South Korean politicians are trying to craft legislation that places video game addiction as the lunch-meat in their alcohol and drugs sandwich.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

I do not believe that video games or Internet for that matter should be in question for addiction. If people really do enjoy playing video games, that's okay. For kids who spend all of their time playing video games, it is the responsibility of the parent to handle that, not the government. And for the adults for are "addicted" (and I use the word addicted loosely) should take charge of their own life. There is no problem playing video games, but one should not let it consume their life. It is only a game after all.

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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Criminal Justice in America
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The Insanity Of The Drug War & Ending the Global Drug War: Voices from the Front Lines

The Insanity Of The Drug War & Ending the Global Drug War: Voices from the Front Lines | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it
Anti-prohibitionists speak out:.."Ever since the War on Drugs, everything has hit the fan," says Romesh Bhattacharji, former Narcotics Commissioner of India. Rather than continue the unnecessary and costly drug war, Bhattacharji advises the United States to simply "Relax, take it easy, [and] tolerate."

Last month, at the Cato Institute's "Ending the Global War on Drugs" conference, Bhattacharji's sentiments were echoed by ex-drug czars, cops, politicians, intellectuals, liberal and conservative journalists, and even the former President of Brazil. Reason.tv attended the event and spoke with a number of the featured speakers, including:

Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com

Mary Anastasia O'Grady, Wall Street Journal

Tucker Carlson, The Daily Caller

Luis Alberto Lacalle Pou, Speaker of the House of Deputies, Uruguay

Leigh Maddox, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition; University of Maryland School of Law

Enrique Gomez Hurtado, former Senator, Colombia

Larry Campbell, Senator, Canada

Romesh Bhattacharji, former Narcotics Commissioner, India

Eric Sterling, Criminal Justice Policy Foundation

Harry G. Levine, Queens College (N.Y.)

Juan Carlos Hidalgo, Cato Institute

About 6.15 minutes. Produced and Edited by Anthony L. Fisher. Camera by Joshua Swain, with help from Seth McKelvey. Graphics by Meredith Bragg.

Visit Reason.tv for downloadable versions, and subscribe to Reason.tv's YouTube Channel to receive automatic updates when new material goes live.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=a1dG-80D-2E#! 

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

I think that even though everyone wants to end the drug war, it will never fully be over. We are always going to have people that are using the illegal substances such as drugs. Not everyone can follows the laws that we have placed. And as long as the United States has the cirminal justice policy in place, there will always be a drug war.

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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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Targeting cannabis reward-effect could help treat addiction (UK)

Targeting cannabis reward-effect could help treat addiction (UK) | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it
A new drug that targets the rewarding effects of cannabis could help some to overcome their addiction.

Via ReGenUC
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

I do not agree with this article at all. Cannabis is a drug that could cause many hallucinations, even though it is by far the least harmful drug of all hallucinogens. 

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ReGenUC's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:07 PM

It will be interesting to see future research on this medication.

Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from projectbrainsaver
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Study shows non-hallucinogenic cannabinoids are effective anti-cancer drugs

Study shows non-hallucinogenic cannabinoids are effective anti-cancer drugs | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it

Via Mark Aldiss
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

For many years, we have been trying to develop a cure, or even some type of temporary treatment for cancer. I know that some states have made it legal to have medically prescribed cannabinoids. I think that if this could be a treatment for cancer, even if a small one, all states should make it legal. However, they need to screen the patients beforehand to make sure that it really is a good option for them. They need to monitor their dosage, only letting them use it in the facinity of hospitals, not at home where they could possibly share the drug, or even sell it.

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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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Baby sham? Can trying alcohol during puberty lead to addiction? (UK)

Baby sham? Can trying alcohol during puberty lead to addiction? (UK) | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it
A Daily Mail headline claimed trying alcohol during puberty increases the chance of addiction. But the results are far less persuasive

Via ReGenUC
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

Because the rats test only tested to the age of 23, I don't think that they could really prove that drinking at a younger age causes a greater likelihood to become an addict. Just because they are an alcoholic when they are 23, does not mean that they will be for the rest of their life.

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Rescooped by Jaid Gilbert from Amazing Science
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CDC study: Painkiller addictions worst drug epidemic in US history

CDC study: Painkiller addictions worst drug epidemic in US history | Drugs and Addiction | Scoop.it

Fatal overdoses have reached epidemic levels, exceeding those from heroin and cocaine combined, according to the CDC. Prescriptions for painkillers in the United States have nearly tripled in the past two decades and fatal overdoses reached epidemic levels, exceeding those from heroin and cocaine combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

At the same time, the first-ever global analysis of illicit drug abuse published this month by The Lancet, a British medical journal, found that addictions to heroine and popular painkillers, including Vicodin and OxyContin, kill the most people and cause the greatest health burden, compared to illicit drugs such as marijuana and cocaine.

 

High-income nations, such as the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, had the highest rates of abuse, 20 times greater than in the least impacted countries, according to The Lancet study.

In the United States, enough painkillers were prescribed in 2010 to medicate every American adult around-the-clock for one month.

 

Dr. Andrew Kolodny, president of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing, told Al Jazeera that the United States is facing a dangerous epidemic of overdoses and addictions related to painkillers. "According to the CDC, this is the worst drug epidemic in U.S. history," he said. "CDC has data demonstrating that around the same time doctors began aggressively prescribing these medications in the late 1990s, there have been parallel increases in rates of addiction."

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Kolodny said, is "failing miserably" at curbing the epidemic.

 

"The way to turn this epidemic around is for doctors to prescribe painkillers more cautiously," he said. But that can only happen, Kolodny said, when the FDA changes labeling requirements for painkillers, "making it easier for medical schools and the larger medical community to prescribe these meds more cautiously." He called current FDA-approved labeling "very broad," because the drugs have no suggested maximum dose nor suggested duration of use.

 

Kolodny is part of a group of health officials who signed a citizens' petition (PDF) in 2012 urging the FDA to change labeling requirements on how and when doctors should prescribe painkillers. The group called on the FDA to limit the drugs' approved use to those suffering from "severe" pain, as opposed to the current FDA-approved standard of "moderate to severe pain."

 

FDA spokeswoman Morgan Liscinsky, however, said that prescription painkillers are an important component of modern pain management. The FDA, she said, is working to balance the dual responsibility of addressing misuse, abuse and addiction with continuing to ensure appropriate access to effective pain management for patients who need these medications. 

 

The FDA "is extremely concerned about the inappropriate use" of painkillers, she said, "which has become a major public health challenge for our nation," and the agency "is committed to ongoing efforts to address the problem and supports broader initiatives to address this public health problem, including regulatory, educational and scientific activities."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Jaid Gilbert's insight:

"In the United States, enough painkillers were prescribed in 2010 to medicate every American adult around-the-clock for one month."

 

Why are doctors prescribing so much pain medication? Not ever case needs pain medication. A lot of people will fake being in pain in order to get their hands on the pian medications. I believe that it is okay to prescribe pain medicaiton, but in moderation. 

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Kailyn Taylor's curator insight, December 11, 2013 6:16 PM

This article appears on my page becuase painkillers are a popular and serious type of drug. Painkillers in the US have almost tripled in the past 20 years, more than heroin and cocaine. In 2010, enough painkillers were perscribed to medicate every American adult are the clock for one month. A person just getting perscribed to pain killers would benefit from reading this because it serves as a warning to what could happen to someone that got addicted. This article relates to drug addiction because painkillers are highly addictive. 

Courtney Wyche's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:13 AM

This is crazy. I thought it was bewildering when it said that perscriptions and overdoses from painkillers have tripled. I feel like the FDA should change labeling on painkillers as soon as possible to stop this epidemic.