Dreams-Aspect 3
28 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sarah MacAllister
Scoop.it!

How Can You Control Your Dreams?: Scientific American

How Can You Control Your Dreams?: Scientific American | Dreams-Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
The ability to manipulate our dream worlds goes beyond the science fiction plot of the movie Inception . A dream expert from Harvard University explains how it works
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah MacAllister
Scoop.it!

Dream Experience: Exploring Multiple Dream Theories

Dream Experience: Exploring Multiple Dream Theories | Dreams-Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
The experiences of our dreams hold many clues about other realms of existence and dormant abilities humanity possesses, but that usually fall in science fiction or ignored as being random imaginings without any weight on ...
more...
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 17, 2013 8:43 PM
There are many other theories that scientists have put together. One is that dreams help us determine who we are as humans. Another is that dreams are a way for our mind to organize thoughts and feelings and decisions. One theory, though arguably invalid, goes along with the Matrix, in the sense that our physical world is an illusion. While dreaming, the soul can be influenced by other spiritual creatures. These creatures "feed on fear, anxiety, confusion (parasites in this sense), or to help guide the individual toward wisdom, love, confidence..."
Scooped by Sarah MacAllister
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung's Dream Theories « Alan Jones « Alan B Jones

Carl Jung’s Dream Theories By Christina Sponias
Jung believed that the human psyche was divided in two parts-the conscious and the unconscious mind.
more...
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 15, 2013 10:28 AM
Carl Jung believed that the unconscious mind is split into two parts: personal and collective distinctions. The personal section keeps a person's individual experiences and the collective section is the same general content in every human being. The collective section is surfaced in dreams through symbols, also known as archetypes.
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 15, 2013 10:32 AM
Jung believed that there are three main symbols represented in dreams: the persona, the shadow, and animus or anima. The persona is how the world sees the dreamer, and incorporates their social position or status quo. The shadow "is the part of the human psyche that is not developed yet. The shadow contains positive and negative characteristics, depending on someone's personal evolution." The animus or anima is the perfect man or woman for the dreamer. This image is an idol and can be made up, or could be a real person in the dreamer's life.
Scooped by Sarah MacAllister
Scoop.it!

Do Babies Dream? - World of Lucid Dreaming

Do Babies Dream? - World of Lucid Dreaming | Dreams-Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Do babies dream? If so, what do they dream about? Dr Charles P Pollack of the Sleep Center for Medicine tells us what science knows of newborn baby dreams.
more...
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 17, 2013 2:32 PM
Babies do dream. We know this because if you watch a baby sleep, you can actually see their eyelids moving while they dream, displaying the action of rapid eye movement (REM). Scientists say that there is no way of knowing what babies dream about, though. The only thing that can be assumed about babies' dreams is according to which way their eyes are moving. If their eye movement is vertical, they are most likely looking up at a building or maybe climbing stairs. Horizontal eye movement could suggest they were walking in a field.
Scooped by Sarah MacAllister
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Sigmund Freud's Theory on Dreams | :: Insomnium ::

Introduction to Sigmund Freud's Theory on Dreams | :: Insomnium :: | Dreams-Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Freud maintained the notion that the dream fundamentally acts as the guardian of sleep. When we go to bed, the curtains are drawn, the lights are turned off and in effect we are attempting to disconnect from our reality by ...
more...
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 15, 2013 10:14 AM
With Sigmund Freud's theory of a dream being made up of two parts, the manifest content and latent content, he believed that the latent content was merged into the manifest by a process called "dream work." In this process, the latent thoughts are disguised by condensation, displacement, symbolism, and secondary revision. In condensation, "two or more latent thoughts are combined to make up one manifest dream image or situation." With displacement, if the dreamer has underlying feelings or desires towards a certain person, the emotion is directed towards a random object in the manifest dream. Symbolism is obviously just using similar objects to represent the feeling. Freud believed that most symbols in dreams are sex-oriented. Secondary revision, the final step of dream work, makes the dream more organized for the dreamer's every day life. This is when the symbolism and contradictions are hidden to form a more understood image and story.
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 15, 2013 10:19 AM
Since Freud believed that most symbols in dreams have a sexual correlation, he had a theory that "objects such as tree-trunks, ties, all weapons, sticks, balloon, rockets and other elongated objects were all symbols for the male organ/an erection." Open objects, such as boxes, suitcases, and ovens symbolized the female genitalia. Symbols for women in general could be rooms, doors, or even the whole house and landscape. "The simple act of walking up a staircase, steps, or ladders could also signify a sexual act."
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 15, 2013 10:24 AM
To reveal the latent content of a dream, Freud would have his patients describe the dream as accurately as possible then to focus on certain points in the dream, all the manifest content. The dreamer would go through each element to make as many connections are possible. This made the dreamer's mind explore all possibilities of symbols. In the end, the dreamer has worked backwards through dream work to reveal the true meaning of the dream, the latent content.
Scooped by Sarah MacAllister
Scoop.it!

Why Do We Dream? - Top Dream Theories

Why Do We Dream? - Top Dream Theories | Dreams-Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered why you dream? This question has fascinated people since the beginning of recorded history, but today we still don't fully understand the purpose of dreams. Learn more about some of the most prominent theories of dreams.
more...
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 14, 2013 10:06 AM
There are some scientists that believe that dreams have no function in our lives or physical beings. Some think that dreaming helps us mentally, emotionally, and physically. The director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Newton Wellesley Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, Ernest Hoffman, said "...a possible (though certainly not proven) function of a dream to be weaving new material into the memory system in a way that both reduces emotional arousal and is adaptive in helping us cope with further trauma or stressful events." In other words, dreams give us insight to our lives and how to deal with events.
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 14, 2013 10:14 AM
Sigmund Freud had several theories about dreams, one being that "dreams were a representation of unconscious desires, thoughts and motivations." In one study of the personality, Freud found that "people are driven by aggressive and sexual instincts that are repressed from conscious awareness." Theses desires are made known to us through dreams. Freud also suggested that there are two components that make up dreams: Manifest content and latent content. Manifest content being the images we see in our dreams and the thoughts our feelings that come immediately from the dream. Latent content is the deeper meaning of the dream. Though this is still believed by people today, there is no evidence that the manifest content covers up the deeper meaning of a dream.
Sarah MacAllister's comment, March 14, 2013 10:28 AM
There are many different theories backing up why we dream and what the meaning of dreams could be or if there is any meaning behind our dreams. These are some theories: Dreams are our brains trying to understand outside noises that we hear while asleep. Examples, people talking or the TV or a radio could be in the dream. Another theory says that dreams are our brain's way of trying to clean up "clutter from the mind." This refreshes the brain and prepares it for the day to come. One theory suggests that dreams are a form of psychotherapy, where the dreamer can safely make "connections between different thoughts and emotions." This could go along with the theory of trying to solve troubling problems. Another combination of theories came up with dreams being "connections between thoughts and ideas, which are then guided by the emotions of the dreamer." This idea suggests that dreams do not have a deeper meaning.