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Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
Curated by Andrew Spong
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Doctor-patient email: are we really still having this debate?

Doctor-patient email: are we really still having this debate? | Doctor | Scoop.it

David E. Williams writes:

 

'Dr. Joseph Kvedar of the Center for Connected Health trots out all the well-rehearsed arguments that have been used over the past 15 years to encourage patients to use electronic messaging with their patients. And I agree with it all:

 

* Privacy concerns are overblown and not unique to electronic media

* Not every interaction needs to be in-person

* Doctors won’t be inundated with messages, despite their fears

* Patients feel more connected to their physicians when they can reach them online

* Electronic communications promotes efficiency

* Liability issues are minor.'

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There is a patient attached to that implantable defibrillator

There is a patient attached to that implantable defibrillator | Doctor | Scoop.it

David Lee Scher, MD writes:

 

'One thing I always emphasize is that on the other side of an ICD is a patient.

 

That is the focal point of care. We do not treat devices, we treat patients. The technology is but one tool we use, and not the thread that holds the doctor-patient relationship together.'

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Mobile technology use by doctors: preventing a tool from becoming a distraction

Mobile technology use by doctors: preventing a tool from becoming a distraction | Doctor | Scoop.it

In order to 'balance highly promising technologies with an unbroken focus on the patient', healthcrare professionals are recommended to:

 

1. Separate personal and professional use

Physicians should dedicate one of their handheld devices to only their professional work. This device should be stocked with professional e-mail, messaging, and medical applications. It should not include Facebook or social networks or applications that can lead to distractions.

 

[AS: not quite how I thought this answer was going to read. I can certainly see a case for an opposing/adapted POV.]

 

2. Develop new methods of interaction

When entering an exam room, physicians must first focus on the patient. Once introductions have been made, physicians should explain what technology they will be using and why.

 

3. Expand the physician-patient conversation

Physicians must treat the electronic device as a third person in the exam room. When interacting with the technology, physicians should explain their actions to the patient. When reviewing information on the device, they should turn back to the patient and share their findings.

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The future of patient stories

The future of patient stories | Doctor | Scoop.it

Bryan Vartabedian, MD (@Doctor_V) reflects:

 

'They say that the future of medicine is personalized. And what’s more personal than someone’s story?'

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Healthcare Blogging 101: how a blog can help you engage online

Healthcare Blogging 101: how a blog can help you engage online | Doctor | Scoop.it

Angela Dunn (@blogbrevity) explains how healthcare blogs can engage online medical consumers and patients.

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The role of Accredited Social Health Activists in effective health care delivery

The role of Accredited Social Health Activists in effective health care delivery | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Our findings imply that there should be more involvement of community in recruiting and discussing responsibilities of the Accredited Social Health Activists. This will enable ASHAs to effectively act as a bridge between the community and the formal healthcare services.

 

Strengthening the healthcare institutions, by better equipping health sub-centres and primary health centres for safe childbirth services, can enhance ASHAs’ contribution. This is because referrals from healthcare services to long distance hospitals act as a major deterrent for institutional deliveries. Also there should be more scope for discussion and feedback among the frontline health workers and the supervisory staff.'

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Catharina Hospital and Philips launch Dutch Social Media initiative

Catharina Hospital and Philips launch Dutch Social Media initiative | Doctor | Scoop.it

'For the first time in the Netherlands, the treatment of a patient with a heart rhythm disorder can be followed via social media. Sharing the experience of a real patient is part of a unique initiative organized by the Catharina Hospital (Eindhoven, The Netherlands) and Philips.

 

By following @hartpatientAd and @cardioloogLukas on Twitter, patient Ad Langendonk from Eindhoven and his cardiologist, Dr Lukas Dekker, can be followed for a month from January 10 onwards.'

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20 Hospitals with inspiring Social Media strategies

20 Hospitals with inspiring Social Media strategies | Doctor | Scoop.it

Hospitals and social media are a great mix, offering a wealth of opportunities for connecting with the community, patients, and even collaborating across health systems and between different hospitals.

 

Some medical groups are wary of the liability and privacy issues that social media may open up, but others have found ways to manage these concerns and enjoy the benefits of using social media.

 

This article identifies 20 inspiring ways hospitals are using social media, from crisis communication to customer service, and highlights what is good about each organisation's approach.

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Patient-matched technology increases surgical efficiency for hospitals

Patient-matched technology increases surgical efficiency for hospitals | Doctor | Scoop.it

Surgical accuracy, and, by extension, hospital efficiency, could be improved through the use of patient-matched technology, according to a study published in the January 2012 edition of The 

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Where's the manual for games for health?

Where's the manual for games for health? | Doctor | Scoop.it

“Where’s the manual for games for health? As a physician talking to a patient, what do I tell them to go play? Do I prescribe it, or does my nurse do it? I am a believer; I want to use this stuff. But how do you assure me those problems won’t exist?” asked

Dr Ravi Komatireddy at the recent “The Evolution of Gaming and its Effect on Prevention and Wellness” summit (#mhs11)

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Healthcare: as dangerous for patients as driving?

Healthcare: as dangerous for patients as driving? | Doctor | Scoop.it

'When searching in pubmed for the two mesh terms “patient safety” and “medical education” results in 8 hits. Some research articles and editorials. One quote with literature reference about the extend of the problem is:

 

"Our health care system today has an adverse event rate approximately equal to that of driving an automobile putting patients at a significant risk"

 

The trouble as stated in this excellent editorial in Academic Medicine is the culture in which most health care professional work. Unfortunately working in a health care setting is mostly not about preventing errors or finding solutions to errors as in other sorts of organizations such as with airliner pilots or the military. In those organizations errors are part of their work. They are all expected to be part of the solution to errors than part of the problem. We in health care should also be a part of the solution and put all efforts to achieve succes in fighting against and preventing errors.

 

Medical education should be the place to start with teaching about the subjects of patient safety.'

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6 health tech ideas in medicine in 2012

6 health tech ideas in medicine in 2012 | Doctor | Scoop.it

"In the future we might not prescribe drugs all the time, we might prescribe apps." Singularity University's executive director of FutureMed Daniel Kraft M.D. considers the biggest emerging trends in HealthTech.

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On the primacy of doctor-patient communications

On the primacy of doctor-patient communications | Doctor | Scoop.it

Dr. Aminah Bliss describes the importance to her of listening to patients, and explains the need to ask patients to come to appointments with questions they have prepared. Dr. Bliss is a gynecologist at Plaza Towers OBGYN.

 

[AS: A nice piece I came across this morning, first published on EmpowHER last August.]

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Should physicians email with patients?

Should physicians email with patients? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Joseph Kvedar - founder and director of the Center for Connected Health in Boston - argues that email communication could improve the quality of care patients receive. He writes that email helps him build trust with patients because it "gives my patients a sense of direct access to me. It sends a message that I care and that I'm available to answer questions in a timely manner."

 

Meanwhile, Sam Bierstock -- founder and president of health IT consulting group Champions in Healthcare -- argues that email is "no way to practice medicine." He writes that online communication could "diminish the quality of care delivered" because it does not allow health care providers to interpret body language and tone, which can be important when treating patients.

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I know cancer when I see It

I know cancer when I see It | Doctor | Scoop.it

A provocative post from Dan Palestrant, MD (@dpalestrant), Founder par80 and Sermo:

 

'Today the AMA is the agent of that cancer. It does the same three things to the host, except the host isn’t a patient. It is the US healthcare system.

 

1. Divert resources - The AMA’s CPT system creates a maze of payment infrastructure and rules that diverts resources to administration and makes transparency impossible.

 

2. Fool the immune system - The AMA has fooled the American public into believing they represent the opinion of America’s physicians. Although they refuse to release actual membership numbers, they still claim they are the voice of America’s doctors.

 

3. Self perpetuate - Like a cancer, the AMA perpetuates itself through special interest lobbying, and most importantly, by updating the CPT codes as frequently as possible and forcing the entire healthcare system to use them.'

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Understanding patients' perceptions of Illness make a difference

Understanding patients' perceptions of Illness make a difference | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Understanding illness perceptions and incorporating them into health care is critical to effective treatment. Asking patients about how they view their illness gives physicians the opportunity to identify and correct any inaccurate beliefs patients may have.

 

Once a patient’s illness perceptions are clearly laid out, a physician can try to nudge those beliefs in a direction that is more compatible with treatment or better health outcomes. Such conversations can help practitioners identify patients that are at particular risk of coping poorly with the demands of their illness.'

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Speaking personally: where to give voice to healthcare interests on the social web

Speaking personally: where to give voice to healthcare interests on the social web | Doctor | Scoop.it

Andrew Spong (@andrewspong) writes:

 

'We are all aware of the importance of discoverability on the Internet.

 

We understand that blog posts which cannot be found, regardless of their quality, will not be read. We therefore take pains to optimise our content for search engines by electing to use natural language search terms as post titles, and judiciously tagging posts and images with keywords.

 

However, how much thought are we giving to the context within which the content we publish across the social web is considered?'

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The use of Skype (or VoIP) for medical consultations

The use of Skype (or VoIP) for medical consultations | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Two weeks ago I attended a face-to-face consultation at my local hospital which in itself lasted no more than 5 minutes. For it, I had to take half a day off work (travel forth and back, time spent walking forth and back from the car park, waiting time etc) , spent £5 on petrol, and £4 on car parking fees. Not to mention, the time it took to make up the hours and of course the freezing cold weather. I’m sure many of you can relate to this.

 

As I was driving home, I realised that had my consultant just dropped me a 5 minutes call, it would have saved so much time and hassle saved costs for me and the NHS too (they wouldn’t need multiple waiting areas, staff, cleaners and parking spaces!), which would result in increased productivity, cost savings and convenience for both the NHS and patients.'

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Texas doctors lead open-notes movement

Texas doctors are at the vanguard of what U.S. researchers say is an inevitable revolution to make consultation notes and other records easily accessible to patients.

 

The idea, at odds with the decades-old attitude that medical records belong to doctors because they're the only ones trained to interpret them, is being tested in an ongoing national study that has already confirmed that patients want to read their notes but most doctors are still resistant.

 

"Many doctors aren't there yet, but this is going to happen, this can't be stopped," said Jan Walker, a nurse at Harvard Medical School's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and the study's lead author. "In today's more transparent society, patients want this - and it should be to everyone's benefit."

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Twitter use forecasted cholera outbreak

Twitter use forecasted cholera outbreak | Doctor | Scoop.it

'For the second time this month, a study shows the value of online tools and information--including social media--to healthcare professionals.

 

Researchers affiliated with Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital determined that use of Twitter and Internet news uncovered a 2010 outbreak of cholera in Haiti two weeks earlier than health officials reported the epidemic, according to a study in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.'

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Getting Patients to take charge of their health

Getting Patients to take charge of their health | Doctor | Scoop.it

Patients who are more involved in their health care are less likely to smoke, be obese or go the emergency room than those who are less engaged.

 

Now doctors are trying to figure out the best way to get them involved.

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Next-gen mHealth apps may be the right prescription for EHR

Next-gen mHealth apps may be the right prescription for EHR | Doctor | Scoop.it

Reda Chouffani asks: 'what would be some of the functional capabilities that will make the most sense for physicians as well as justify the cost and investment in the next generation of mhealth apps and mobile health technologies?'

 

* Timeline view of the patient record

* Contextual functionality

* Connected content, social media integration

* Tag-like functionality

* Natural language processing (NLP)

 

[AS: some great summarising here - worth a read]

 

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Epocrates and M3 partner to create the world's largest physician research panel

Epocrates and M3 partner to create the world's largest physician research panel | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Epocrates, Inc. and M3 Inc. today announced a partnership to create the world's largest verified physician and healthcare provider panel. By combining their high-quality, opted-in physician panels, the companies can now offer a global market research sampling solution.

 

The Epocrates market research panel is comprised of verified U.S. physicians and other healthcare professionals who use the company's mobile clinical reference application, creating stronger engagement and higher responsiveness.

 

M3 Inc. operates globally with physician communities across the world including m3.com, MDLinx.com, Doctors.net.uk, Medquarter.de and Medigate.net. This enabled the development of a proprietary healthcare professional panel with international diversity and extensive reach. M3 is a founding member of the Trust Alliance, recently introduced to promote trust in online physician research.'

 

[AS: Benefiting those who observe HCP communities, or HCPs?]

 

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From the creators of Sermo: par8o

From the creators of Sermo: par8o | Doctor | Scoop.it

Daniel Palestrant (@dpalestrant) writes:

 

'The current healthcare crisis is a uniquely American challenge and ultimately will be solved with a uniquely American solution. The most simple of solutions has yet to be attempted.

 

Having built the largest physician community in the world, we’ve seen first-hand what is happening to our profession and understand what it is doing to our colleagues, and most importantly, our patients.

 

We believe healthcare is best managed by direct collaboration between patients and the physicians providing their care.'

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