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Tracking impact of digital consumer preferences on government service delivery
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How Technology Could Save Government $220 Billion, Empower Citizens: New ... - AOL Government

How Technology Could Save Government $220 Billion, Empower Citizens: New ... - AOL Government | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
How Technology Could Save Government $220 Billion, Empower Citizens: New ...AOL Government...
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An architecture of participation | opensource.com

An architecture of participation | opensource.com | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
What is changing now is that participatory models are becoming the rule, not the exception. The world used to be about command and control. Someone told you what to do. There still is a lot of that. But collaborative innovation is taking over. We are coming to a stage in our civilization where regular functions are masterfully automated and industrialized, and our focus as human beings can and will increasingly be on innovation. In the area of innovation, the most powerful creation happens in teams, groups, and crowds--across organizational boundaries. When we architect for such participation, we can multiply the power of innovation.

Linus Torvalds stumbled over this mechanism over 20 years ago. In an act that was part abandonment and part invitation, he somewhat unknowingly threw out an intriguing challenge to software developers all over the world: Work with me to build a free operating system. And people did--willingly, spontaneously, and brilliantly.

Soon, a number of free and open source software projects were defining the architecture of participation--a model for how to engage people with different ambitions, different mandates, different employers (or no employer at all), and different communication habits in joint projects that unpredictably but inevitably produce superior results.

That's the essence of the architecture of participation. You construct rules of engagement that allow disagreeing people to let their work products agree. This is a system where the designer invites input from contributors. The end result is an ecosystem that evolves faster than any individual initiative, resulting in a work product with fewer deficiencies.

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An interview with the US chief technology officer - McKinsey Quarterly - Public Sector - Management

An interview with the US chief technology officer - McKinsey Quarterly - Public Sector - Management | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
Todd Park explains how he has partnered technology with open-data initiatives to tap into the many talented innovators and entrepreneurs across the government. A McKinsey Quarterly Public Sector article.
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Health 2.0 Code-a-thon Creates Mobile and Web Health Apps With Open Data | Gov 2.0: The Power of Platforms

Health 2.0 Code-a-thon Creates Mobile and Web Health Apps With Open Data | Gov 2.0: The Power of Platforms | DNA Gov | Scoop.it

This weekend, there was a code-a-thon at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health in Washington, DC. Half a dozen or so teams competed for thousands of dollars in prize money. The overall winner was "School Fit," which compares the fitness levels of children in an online mashup of maps & data.

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How To Cash In On Government As A Platform - TechCrunch

How To Cash In On Government As A Platform - TechCrunch | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
TechCrunchHow To Cash In On Government As A PlatformTechCrunchCreate New Government Technology. While contracting can be difficult at times, governments themselves need and are asking for new service providers for their infrastructure.
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TED Blog | TED@State: Clay Shirky on what the government needs to know about social media

TED Blog | TED@State: Clay Shirky on what the government needs to know about social media | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
Today at TED@State, he talks about the new social media landscape — where we are all both consumers and producers (as he says, it’s like if you buy a book and they throw in a printing press for free). He talks about the recent earthquake in China, reported by ordinary Chinese citizens over social media, as it happened. (The last earthquake in China was not reported by Chinese officials for 3 months.) Using Twitter, photo-sharing sites and email, news came pouring out of China. Donation sites sprang up, activism cropped up around the destroyed elementary schools. And then China shut it down. But China’s censorship system depends on a top-down approach to media. And social media breaks that model. As China learned this week, to censor tweets and photos, you need to block Twitter and Flickr.

A story from the Obama campaign (which Shirky calls one of the most innovative uses of social media ever). During the campaign, Senator Obama announced that he would be changing his vote on FISA. A group formed on his own campaign website, MyBO.com, called “President Obama, Please Get FISA Right.” The group grew larger and more vocal. Obama engaged with the group, explained his vote. The group members still weren’t happy — but then they realized that, though they had nearly taken over Obama’s campaign site, nobody had ever tried to hide the group, to delete it, to take it off the site — the role of MyBO.com was to convene their supporters, but not to control their supporters

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Open-source problem solvers creating government 2.0 | KurzweilAI

Open-source problem solvers creating government 2.0 | KurzweilAI | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
A new generation of civically engaged technologists are using their skills to tackle longstanding problems in government, says Andrew Rasiej, founder of (RT @KurzweilAINews: Open-source problem solvers creating government 2.0: A new generation of ...
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Sweden's enormous education experiment improved longevity

Sweden's enormous education experiment improved longevity | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
Children who received an extra year of school in a post-war trial have reaped health benefits.


Shortly after the Second World War, the Swedish government conducted a vast social experiment to decide whether to implement educational reform. An examination of data from people who took part in the study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1, has revealed that those lucky enough to have experienced the reformed system have been more likely than their contemporaries to live a long life.

Governments across northern Europe reformed their education systems in the wake of the Second World War, searching for ways to regain economic strength. “There was an international trend inspired by the United States to go for more comprehensive schooling,” says Anton Lager, a co-author of the research, who studies young people's health at the Centre for Health Equity Studies of Stockholm University. As well as starting to teach all children equally, many countries introduced longer schooling. The United Kingdom, for instance, raised the school leaving age from 14 to 15 in 1944, and to 16 in 1972.

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Open Technology Foundation: Sharing knowledge ... - Gov 2.0 Radio

Open Technology Foundation: Sharing knowledge ... - Gov 2.0 Radio | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
The Open Technology Foundation is a new Australian-based organisation that is a hub for technology and people networks in government to share, reuse and co-invest in open technology initiatives across the public sector.
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Facebook forces cities to rename their pages

Facebook forces cities to rename their pages | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
I was alerted to a new Facebook practice to force cities to rename their Facebook pages. Apparently, generic city names are now violating the terms of use.

One account holder mentioned that they couldn’t post to their own city page anymore and had to inquire with Facebook. The account holder was locked out for a week and after lengthy back-and-forth finally understood the required change and had to agree to rename the page name. In other cases, Facebook reached out to the city and requested the name change directly. Apparently, a new practice that is not just a local U.S. issue, but was also reported to me from Europe.

It makes sense from the perspective of Facebook to reserve a city name as a geographic destination for users to check in via the places status update. It is however very disturbing to those government officials who were maintaining a page for a while, are then locked out of their own page without notice, and have to negotiate a new name with little or no explanation. This is bad business practice and does not help to increase acceptance among government officials – especially internationally and on the local government level, where public managers have very little leverage, support, or capacity to start a fight with Facebook.

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Data Mining Techniques Must Adapt With Web 2.0 - Government Technology

Data Mining Techniques Must Adapt With Web 2.0 - Government Technology | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
Government TechnologyData Mining Techniques Must Adapt With Web 2.0Government TechnologyIs your government agency struggling to get a handle on data mining?
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Why isn’t the Government generally more agile?

Why isn’t the Government generally more agile? | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
Why isn’t innovation part of everything government does? Simple. The constraints on talented people who work in government agencies are enormous.

1. Public sector agencies often have no clear mission
Whereas private sector organizations have paying customers, public sector agencies often have a wide variety of stakeholders. Often there is no clarity as to who are primary stakeholders. When an agency tries to satisfy everyone, it usually ends up satisfying no one.

2. Politics often intervenes
Lack of mission clarity flows in turn from the fact that the Federal Government has become a war zone. Often one party wants an agency to flourish, while the other party wants to hamstring or even kill it. Legislators, intent on exercising control, constrain the agency from innovating in healthy directions.

3. Agencies’ core competence: survival
In a political war zone, it is not surprising that agencies develop a core competence in survival. For instance, NASA, after triumphantly landing a man on the moon in 1969, NASA has successfully defended the same level of budget over the last forty years, while somewhat less successfully defining what to do with the money. Like the Defense Department, NASA has judiciously placed its contracts in states and congressional districts around the country, so that any effort to review NASA’s budget stimulates a firestorm of congressional complaints.

4. The public sector is afflicted by management fads
Public sector agencies also suffer invasions of successive management fads from the private sector. Zero-based budgeting, business process re-engineering and Six Sigma are just a few examples of the waves of management fads that have flowed through the public sector in recent decades. These programs are often imposed from above, without proper adaptation to the needs of the particular agency and without full buy-in. The result is a semblance of implementation, rather than real change and improvement. Managers learn to keep their heads down, knowing that “this too shall pass.”

5. Top managers don’t stay for long
The political heads of agencies are often political appointees who don’t stay for long. They are sometimes dismissive of previous activities of the agency and want to launch something “new” that they can call their own. They are often gone before much can happen. In this world, it is often safer for middle managers to wait for instructions and do what they are told, rather than stick their necks out for something that might become entangled in a political dogfight.

6. Staff are often demoralized
Living in a political war zone can be dispiriting, even for people at high levels. The latest casualty: Olympia Snowe, a popular pro-choice Republican in her 18th year in the Senate after 16 years in the House. She was expected to easily win another term but stunned politicians and the public alike with an announcement last week that she would bow out, citing an “atmosphere of polarization” in Washington DC.

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Dr. Farzad Mostashari: 5 things government can do to improve health technology - Boston.com (blog)

Dr. Farzad Mostashari: 5 things government can do to improve health technology - Boston.com (blog) | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
Dr. Farzad Mostashari: 5 things government can do to improve health technologyBoston.com (blog)Mostashari was in Boston yesterday to speak at the Health 2.0 conference about his vision for what the government can do today to pave the way for new...
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Gov 2.0 more than a "one-shot" for South Australia

Gov 2.0 more than a "one-shot" for South Australia | DNA Gov | Scoop.it
The United States Air Force and Labor senator, Kate Lundy, have become inspirations for the South Australian Government’s burgeoning Gov 2.0 initiatives, according to government CIO, Andrew Mills.
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