Distance Ed Archive
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Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
Curated by ghbrett
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Free Online Open Courses - OEDB.org

Free Online Open Courses - OEDB.org | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Get free online courses from the world's leading universities at the Open Education Database. This collection includes over 2850 free courses in the liberal arts and sciences. Download these audio & video courses straight to your computer or mp3 player." from source: http://oedb.org/open/

ghbrett's insight:

The Open Courses listed on this page include Arts, Education, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Business, Engineering & Computers, Math, Science. In addition to Open Courses already listed, the top navigation bar other topics include Online Colleges, Online Degree Programs, and Library. Currently there are 1166 Full Courses, 423 Video lectures, 214 Audio Lectures, 453 Text Articles, and 577 Mixed Media offerings. Looks like The Open Education Data Base is worth checking out.

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What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning

What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"If you’re an educator, surely you know that technology has and will continue to have an incredible impact on learning. Whether it’s the Internet, innovative learning tools, or teaching technology itself, these two subjects are intertwined. In these talks, you will find essential information for educators concerned with technology." - from the source: https://www.teachthought.com

ghbrett's insight:

This is a good bibliographic style post that has links to 100 resources in topics of where teaching, learning, training, eLearning, and educational technologies are headed. Many of these link are sources from leaders in their respective communities. This is a worthwhile read.

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IVMOOC: Information Visualization

IVMOOC: Information Visualization | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

This course provides an overview about the state of the art in information visualization. It teaches the process of producing effective visualizations that take the needs of users into account.


Among other topics, the course covers:
> Data analysis algorithms that enable extraction of patterns and trends in data
> Major temporal, geospatial, topical, and network visualization techniques
> Discussions of systems that drive research and development.

ghbrett's insight:

This course begins next week, but looks to be an interesting overview of Information Visualization and how it can be found and utilized for research, education, and training. It should prove to be worth the time to participate.

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Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States | The Sloan Consortium

Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States | The Sloan Consortium | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
The tenth annual survey, a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, is the leading barometer of online learning in the United States.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
ghbrett's insight:

A report like this over a span of ten years can provide educators and education administrators a sense where technology in education has been and potential for where it might be headed.

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Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.'s curator insight, January 8, 2013 9:04 PM
The 2012 iteration of the Babson Survey Research Group's annual Survey of Online Learning.
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Help finalize the next version of The Conversation Prism

Help finalize the next version of The Conversation Prism | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Brian Solis writes "Hello everyone! It's that time again when I could use a little help from my friends. After 2 years and two months, The Conversation Prism 4.0 is nearing its completion. To get it over the finish line, I'd love your input. Please take a look at the embedded doc and let me know if there are social tools/services/categories that are missing or if you would remove any as well.
   URL: http://www.theconversationprism.com

 

  Please leave your thoughts in the comments section below." - from source:
 http://briansolis.posterous.com

 

 

 

ghbrett's insight:

The Conversation Prism has be a go-to resource for Social Media Resource and their use and value for years now. It is impressive that Brian is now crowd sourcing and relying on the users / readers of the diagram to improve it. This is an opportunity for the education, research, training, and open-access community to include their favorite applications that share content and support group work.

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Blackboard's New Platform Strategy -

Blackboard's New Platform Strategy - | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

One of the announcements that got the most air time during the conference keynote was the release of xpLOR, Blackboard’s new Learning Object Repository (LOR). Up until now, the LOR has been largely a failure as a product category. The idea has been around for a very long time—at least as long as the LMS—but companies like Blackboard and Desire2Learn have only achieved relatively modest sales of them relative to their LMS business. Likewise, there is no open source LOR with anything like the traction open source LMSs like Moodle and Sakai have. There are a number of reasons why this is so, but probably the biggest is that LORs have not managed to solve the content discoverability problem that is their raison d’être. Instructors’ content needs are often highly specific, and they generally don’t have a lot of time to search for what they need. It’s a pretty demanding use case. Good search for learning content depends on rich meta-data tagging, good search filtering facilities, and a high quantity of niche content. Technologists can address the second of these three needs through software development, but the first and third come down to the users of the system sharing a lot of content and tagging it consistently and accurately. Since this puts a substantial burden on overworked teachers, and since LORs have traditionally been closed systems (thus limiting the number of contributors and number of contributions), installations of these products often don’t get the critical mass of high-quality, well-indexed content in order to be useful.

Blackboard clearly believes that something has changed. Interestingly, both the parent company and Moodlerooms were working on their own next-generation LORs separately before the acquisition. One clear driving factor is the shift of educational publishers to digital. If a substantial portion of the content in the LOR is provided by publishers looking to make a sale, then that content will very likely be tagged well and provided in large volumes—if they can get the publishers to play. This feels like an iTunes-style battle for the distribution channel. While Blackboard didn’t make any announcements about publisher relationships specifically with xpLOR, they have been consistently touting integration of publisher offerings with Blackboard (and did so again in their keynote this year). It certainly makes sense that they might see the current drive to digital from textbook publishers as an opportunity to overcome the historic barriers to making a LOR successful and collect a percentage of every sale. Of course, the publishers are very aware of the iTunes model as well and may be leery of letting an LMS vendor control their sales channel.


Via Heiko Idensen
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Reuse, not production, is key to positive MOOC impact | Keep Learning

Reuse, not production, is key to positive MOOC impact | Keep Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
The issue in higher education is that the really hard and important problems — the problems that no one has solved yet, the problems that will ultimately destroy us — are problems of reuse, not production. David Wiley nailed this years ago in his reusability paradox. Briefly stated, the paradox is this –
..

Designing for reuse (in most situations) means removing contextually-dependent hooks from designed objects.
The value proposition of higher education, unfortunately, is largely the process of contextualization of knowledge. What students find useful in a course is the coherence-building that a teacher and other students provide. Small contextually-dependent hooks such as “As we mentioned last week” are the bread-and-butter sense-making of any course.
Therefore “pedagogical effectiveness and potential for reuse are completely at odds with one another.”
To some extent calling out this paradox was a plea for a truly open set of educational resources – not PDFs of slides, but actual editable PowerPoints. Not DRM’d learning objects, but cuttable videos. Not textbooks as ePubs, but textbooks as editable documents. To be open is to permit local re-contextualization.
Via Heiko Idensen
ghbrett's insight:

Re-use, or re-purposing has been valued by innovative teachers and trainers for years. I remember when MIT was developing the Athena networked learning modules. A friend of mine was a cinematographer for the project. Because they wanted to use the media across varied disciplines they actually ended up creating a hypermedia archive of and around Paris, France. This satisfied foreign languages, architecture, the arts, and other disciplines. One comment he made was the need for multiple beginnings that linked to varied middle content and had multiple endings. So, my take away relates to the notion of "contextual-dependent hooks" and "coherence building" as mentioned above. 

 

Action Item: When using or modifying Open Education Resources, MOOCs, or other Open Content in different situations (aka, Context) why not create or add a link to the new elements or scenarios in order to provide new users to better understand how they might adapt the content to their needs.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 19, 2012 9:01 AM

Re-use, or re-purposing has been valued by innovative teachers and trainers for years. I remember when MIT was developing the Athena networked learning modules. A friend of mine was a cinematographer for the project. Because they wanted to use the media across varied disciplines they actually ended up creating a hypermedia archive of and around Paris, France. This satisfied foreign languages, architecture, the arts, and other disciplines. One comment he made was the need for multiple beginnings that linked to varied middle content and had multiple endings. So, my take away relates to the notion of "contextual-dependent hooks" and "coherence building" as mentioned above.  Action Item: When using or modifying Open Education Resources, MOOCs, or other Open Content in different situations (aka, Context) why not create or add a link to the new elements or scenarios in order to provide new users to better understand how they might adapt the content to their needs.

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IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012

IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"As the year nears its close, IBM, as it has every year since 2006, has pulled out the crystal ball and given us its predictions of five innovations that it believes will impact our lives in the next five years. For this year’s “5-in-5” list, IBM has taken a slightly different approach, with each entry on the list relating to our senses. The company believes cognitive computing whereby computers learn rather than passively relying on programming will be at the core of these innovations, enabling systems that will enhance and augment each of our five senses." - from source http://www.gizmag.com/
ghbrett's insight:

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 18, 2012 6:52 PM

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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Web 3.0+ and Collective Intelligence

Web 3.0+ and Collective Intelligence | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

The ancient Chinese curse or saying — “May you live in interesting times.” — is upon us. We are in the midst of a new revolution fueled by advancements in the Internet and technology. Currently, there is an abundance of information and the size of social interaction has reached a colossal scale. Within a span of just one generation, the availability of information and our access to them has changed dramatically from scarcity to surplus. What humans will do or try to do with such powerful surplus of information will be the main topic of this article. First, let’s understand what brought us to this current state.


Via Zaq Mosher
ghbrett's insight:

A good article about where we are now with the Web and All it's resources. Then it presents a scenario for Web The Next Generation or Web 3.0. This is a good read for folks needing more background and added foresight on how to manage the overwhelming abundance of what it is we call the Web.

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The Human Algorithm: Redefining the Value of Data - Brian Solis

The Human Algorithm: Redefining the Value of Data - Brian Solis | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"... The human algorithm is part understanding and part communication. The ability to communicate and apply insights internally and externally is the key to unlocking opportunities to earn relevance. Beyond research, beyond intelligence, the human algorithm is a function of extracting insights with intention, humanizing trends ad possibilities and working with strategists to improve and innovate everything from processes to products to overall experiences.

The idea of the human algorithm is to serve as the human counterpart to the abundance of new social intelligence and listening platforms hitting the market every day. Someone has to be on the other side of data to interpret it beyond routine. Someone has to redefine the typical buckets where data is poured. And someone has to redefine the value of data to save important findings from a slow and eventual death by three-ring binders rich with direction and meaning."
- from the source: http://www.briansolis.com
ghbrett's insight:

NOTE: This article is in parallel with the increasing number of citations about the need and development of curation in the digital environment by people. This means that while computers can gather, mine, sort, and roughly analyze Big Data, there still is a need for a human interface / filter. These people are necessary not only for research or corporate environments, but also libraries, instructional design, and assessment analytics of eLearning ecosystems.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 14, 2012 11:26 AM

NOTE: This article is in parallel with the increasing number of citations about the need and development of curation in the digital environment by people. This means that while computers can gather, mine, sort, and roughly analyze Big Data, there still is a need for a human interface / filter. These people are necessary not only for research or corporate environments, but also libraries, instructional design, and assessment analytics of eLearning ecosystems.

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THE END OF SMARTPHONES: Here's A Computer Screen On A Contact Lens

THE END OF SMARTPHONES: Here's A Computer Screen On A Contact Lens | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Ghent (University, Belgium) researchers imagine that in the near future, (contact) lenses like they one they've built will be able to change the color of the wearer's eye, work as sunglasses, or serve a medical purpose like protecting a damaged iris from bright light.


Farther out in time, De Smet and his team believe the lenses could function as a head-up display, "superimposing an image onto the user’s normal view."

 

Eventually this kind of screen-on-the-eye technology could displace the smartphone as as the dominant way people access the Internet and connect to each other." -- from the source: http://www.businessinsider.com/

 

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 11, 2012 6:18 PM

NOTE: Higher education and corporate training instructional designers are focusing on building distance learning apps to work on multiple platforms. What's going to happen when a "heads up device" (HUD) like the one Ghent is working on comes available? I know this is a futuristic notion, but it demonstrates the need for education & training software to be trully platform independent. Not to mention adherence to existing and emergent standards. Thanks to +Ted Newcomb for the lead.
- ghbrett

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Air Force Stumbles Over Software Modernization Project

Air Force Stumbles Over Software Modernization Project | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"In policy circles, problems that are mind-bogglingly difficult or impossible to solve, like global warming, are formally termed “wicked.”

 

For the United States Air Force, installing a new software system has certainly proved to be a wicked problem. Last month, it canceled a six-year-old modernization effort that had eaten up more than $1 billion. When the Air Force realized that it would cost another $1 billion just to achieve one-quarter of the capabilities originally planned — and that even then the system would not be fully ready before 2020 — it decided to decamp.


... the Air Force’s software was not some mystery package, nor was it written from scratch. It was commercial off-the-shelf software, or “COTS” (the military can’t seem to resist any chance to use an acronym).


Installing COTS to run an enterprise is not a straightforward matter. The Air Force would have to make myriad adjustments to accommodate its individual needs, and in a military setting that would mean meetings and more meetings, unlike anything ever experienced in a Silicon Valley company. " -- from the source: http://www.nytimes.com/

 

NOTE: This is not the first time that a federal agency has suffered a "wicked problem" with development or implementation of IT systems. At one time I felt this shouldn't be so hard, but having spent some time with federal agencies, I now realize that there are necessary standards and policies that to this point have not been necessary for the general public. However, as more people grow aware of hazards of living a digital life, we may begin to see modified versions of government policies and practices applied to commodity, training, and educational IT environments. - ghbrett

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Napster, Udacity, and the Academy -- Clay Shirky

"Once you see this pattern—a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible, with the incumbents the last to know—you see it everywhere. First, the people running the old system don’t notice the change. When they do, they assume it’s minor. Then that it’s a niche. Then a fad. And by the time they understand that the world has actually changed, they’ve squandered most of the time they had to adapt.

 

It’s been interesting watching this unfold in music, books, newspapers, TV, but nothing has ever been as interesting to me as watching it happen in my own backyard. Higher education is now being disrupted; our MP3 is the massive open online course (or MOOC), and our Napster is Udacity, the education startup.

 

We have several advantages over the recording industry, of course. We are decentralized and mostly non-profit. We employ lots of smart people. We have previous examples to learn from, and our core competence is learning from the past. And armed with these advantages, we’re probably going to screw this up as badly as the music people did."
- from the source: http://www.shirky.com/

 

NOTE: A well written cautious piece about the barriers to diffusion of new media, new technology, and new ways to teach, learn, or train. Definitely worth reading.

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7 Ways Higher Ed Faculty Can Evolve

7 Ways Higher Ed Faculty Can Evolve | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Here is the list of the topics that are explored in greater depth in this post:

1. Be willing to be a pioneer
2. Do research that’s useful and benefits the community
3. Treat funding as a means to an end, not an end in itself
4. Focus on adding value, not just transferring data to students
5. Embrace new pedagogical methods
6. Welcome collaboration
7. Look to the past

-- Source: http://www.teachthought.com/

ghbrett's insight:

Not only do the authors present the list of topics, but also two important pieces of information: 1) a link to related information and 2) a paragraph briefly explaining the value of the topic with embedded links to even more related information. All in all this post is the starting point for loads of information about these digital evolution topics.

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Debategraph

"DebateGraph is an award-winning, cloud-based service that offers individuals and communities a powerful way to learn about and deliberate and decide on complex issues.


It does so by enabling communities of any size to externalize, visualize, question, and evaluate all of the considerations that any member thinks may be relevant to the topic at hand – and by facilitating intelligent, constructive dialogue within the community around those issues.


Moreover, each public map contributes to, and forms part of an accumulating graph of structured understanding across a growing range of topics, which, as the topics intersect, accelerates and enriches each community's understanding of the topics each is addressing." -- from source: http://debategraph.org/

ghbrett's insight:

This is an interesting visualization tool for conceptual mapping, topic mapping, or collaborative mind mapping. Worth noting is that there are already many graphs that are open for one to add their thoughts to. Subjects and topics relevant to science, philosophy, politics, and many other areas. This is also a good tool for teaching and allowing a topic to be explored from different angles. The application includes other resources such as RSS, create posters, or embed a graph into other web pages.

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'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

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ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:12 AM

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

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Twitter / Search - #moocmooc

"This is a twitter search stream about Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs). As an explanation and about the use of the hash tag here are some example tweets using the tag:


> 'Joanna Howard, ‏@LaProflady:
This moocmooc reminds me of an enormous unconference. #moocmooc'


> 'Angela Gail V-C ‏@faroop:
Looking at the data: the first two days of #moocmooc http://ow.ly/gElJN '


> 'Bernard Bull ‏@bdean1000:
Please add to the list. "What if" Questions to Re-imagine Learning Through Participant Pedagogy- http://bit.ly/ZGJgzw #moocmooc #post'


-- from source: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23moocmooc&src=typd

ghbrett's insight:

This Twitter search stream is a useful stream of content about MOOCs from those who have used them, who have taught them, who like them, who don't like them. I provides snippets with link to expanded explanations for people who are interested in MOOCs for what ever reason. @Angela's post links to data numbers and charts about usage and participation of #moocmooc. @Bernard's post has a link to a long article about the concept of Moocs and their relationship the #Peeragogy from @hrheingold. Given that this is a living stream, every visit will provide you with new and varying information. Be sure to visit it at least once, but a couple times would prove more useful. #moocmooc #mooc #distance-ed #education

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10 Predictions for Personalized Learning for 2013

10 Predictions for Personalized Learning for 2013 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
Check out what Personalized Learning will be like in 2013.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, João Greno Brogueira, Heiko Idensen
ghbrett's insight:

Empowerment is the key theme of these 10 predictions for personal learning. The article explains each in more detail about why and how they will affect personal learning.
1. Connected Learners
2. Mobile Devices
3. Communities of Practice
4. Evidence of Learning
5. Taking Risks
6. Storytelling
7. Learner Voice and Choice
8. Unpacking Standards
9. Transforming Learning Environments
10. Building a Common Language

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Serge Renard's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:18 AM

http://proser.renard.free.fr/

Serge Renard's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:20 AM

http://proser.renard.free.fr/

Thomas Salmon's curator insight, May 6, 2013 1:34 PM

Interesting, in other ways this could also be seen as framing learning as a constant performance of assessment. Where do you draw the line ?

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Rotman Dean Roger Martin on Design Thinking

Rotman School Dean Roger Martin explains why business people don't need to understand designers, they have to become designers. Produced by NeoCon.

 

Notes from the video: "...Business person trained to analytical thinking to produce reliability. ...The Designer is not so much a consistent outcome, but an outcome they love... Design Thinking is thinking that combines the best of analytical thinking with intuitive thinking... the result of the combination of these two is creativity and longevity."

ghbrett's insight:

This is one of the more succinct descriptions of Design Thinking in Business versus Graphic or 3D or Product Design. Brief, to the point. The process described could result in processes that one usually considers to be "outside of the box." On the other hand the results as described are creative (new & innovative) and have longevity (sustainable & viable). This reviewer plans to look into this line of thinking more for application to online learning and distance teaching. Design Thinking for Education.

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Why Curation Will Transform Education and Learning: 10 Key Reasons

Why Curation Will Transform Education and Learning: 10 Key Reasons | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"This article, builds up over my recent presentation on Content Curation for Education that I delivered at Emerge2012 virtual conference.

In that presentation I claimed that the adoption of "curation approaches" will directly affect the way competences are taught, how textbooks are put together, how students are going to learn about a subject, and more than anything, the value that can be generated for "others" through a personal learning path.

If we learn not by memorizing facts, but by collaborating with others in the creation of a meaningful collection-explanations of specific topics/issues/events then, for the first time in history, we can enrich planetary knowledge each time we take on a new learning task." -- from source: http://www.masternewmedia.org/
ghbrett's insight:

As we produce more content and multimedia, who is going to clean up after us? Since we have endless storage on site and in many "clouds," there is less need to prune or delete data than ever before. This reviewer remembers having a disk with 26KB storage which needed to be used attentively. This article is one of the better of the emerging topic and related processes of Curating our stuff. Often the metaphor of one's Digital Footprints is raised as a way of describing all the different services, systems, machines, archives, etc., etc. that our stuff is. Oh, and then there are the other pack rats who have copied our stuff and put it into their stashes. Folks, it's time to take a moment to reflect on what we are doing with content, media, and stuff. Then curate by pruning, updating, aggregating, and other such digital stewardship. Finally, as my Father always said, "Don't do as I do, please do what I say." (grin)

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 18, 2012 7:02 PM

As we produce more content and multimedia, who is going to clean up after us? Since we have endless storage on site and in many "clouds," there is less need to prune or delete data than ever before. This reviewer remembers having a disk with 26KB storage which needed to be used attentively. This article is one of the better of the emerging topic and related processes of Curating our stuff. Often the metaphor of one's Digital Footprints is raised as a way of describing all the different services, systems, machines, archives, etc., etc. that our stuff is. Oh, and then there are the other pack rats who have copied our stuff and put it into their stashes. Folks, it's time to take a moment to reflect on what we are doing with content, media, and stuff. Then curate by pruning, updating, aggregating, and other such digital stewardship. Finally, as my Father always said, "Don't do as I do, please do what I say." (grin)

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Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"I (Howard Rheingold) also discovered, through a co-learner in a Rheingold U class, about "Paragogy" -- the nascent theory of peer to peer pedagogy. The co-learner, Charles Danoff, wrote a paper about it with Joseph Corneli: Paragogy: Synthesizing Individual and Organizational Learning. Searching on the word "paragogy" reveals more resources -- but not so many that they can't be surveyed quickly. The field is just beginning to grow.

I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy." While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory. In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion. Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups? In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.

It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning." http://dmlcentral.net/
ghbrett's insight:

Recently there has been great interest in massive open online courses (MOOCs) as collaborative online learning experiences. This reviewer has been hearing, reading, listening, and talking about collaboration for education, training, and research for a couple decades now. Moving beyond the MOOC concept, Howard's article is a thoughtful piece on his and other's view of peeragogy. It contemplates the where and the how "peeragogy" will be a convergence of collaboration, self-learning, organized learning, MOOCs and other online collaborative resources. There is great potential here for advances in how to use technology. This will happen in a way that improves communication between and among students, teachers, and others.  Plus "peeragogy" will engage people to become participants in these processes rather than silent observers.

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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, May 1, 2015 8:57 AM

Howard Rheingold-- co-learners, Paragogy

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Peer-to-Peer Learning Handbook | Peeragogy.org

Peer-to-Peer Learning Handbook | Peeragogy.org | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"With YouTube, Wikipedia, search engines, free chatrooms, blogs, wikis, and video communication, today’s self-learners have power never dreamed-of before. What does any group of self-learners need to know in order to self-organize learning about any topic? The Peeragogy Handbook is a volunteer-created and maintained resource for bootstrapping peer learning.

This project seeks to empower the worldwide population of self-motivated learners who use digital media to connect with each other, to co-construct knowledge of how to co-learn. Co-learning is ancient; the capacity for learning by imitation and more, to teach others what we know, is the essence of human culture. We are human because we learn together. Today, however, the advent of digital production media and distribution/communication networks has raised the power of co-learning to a new level." -- from the source: http://peeragogy.org/
ghbrett's insight:

  This project / living document for co-eLearning will be a site worth participating in or a the least reading periodically. Howard Rheingold, under the "Resources" section has a post about "How to use this Handbook" at http://peeragogy.org/how-to-use-this-handbook/ ;  So be sure to check this out. BTW there is an initial YouTube! video clip by Howard introducing Peeragogy at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDuSpOUtyJE   

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20 Game-Changing Technology Trends That Will Create Both Disruption and Opportunity on a Global Level | Flash Foresights from Daniel Burrus | Big Think

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends That Will Create Both Disruption and Opportunity on a Global Level | Flash Foresights from Daniel Burrus | Big Think | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"No matter what industry you’re in, your company can’t survive without technology. And these days, even non-technical employees know that technology goes way beyond desktop computers and networks. From smart phones and tablet computers to mobile apps and cloud-based technology, there’s a plethora of technological advancements to not only keep track of, but also to profit from. To stay competitive, your organization needs to anticipate the most significant technology trends that are shaping your business and then develop innovative ways to use them to your advantage, both inside and outside of your organization. Remember, if it can be done, it will be done. If you don’t use these technologies to create a competitive advantage, someone else will." - from source: http://bigthink.com/
ghbrett's insight:

NOTE: This article provides a list of 20 emerging or evolving technology trends that will become more available in the next 5 years. Most of these are already being adopted by research, teaching, learning, and training organizations. What I liked about the article is the last paragraph where the author states in effect, this is just the tip of the iceberg. The author says this is only a few and there are other trends that will appear on the radar during the coming five years as well. -- ghbrett

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Classroom Tech Ideas

Classroom Tech Ideas | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
60 Apps For Mobile, 21st Century Learning (http://t.co/sJW5Hwtu 60 Apps For Mobile, 21st Century Learning...)...
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How to Evaluate Learning: Kirkpatrick Model for the 21st Century—A Revision | Social Learning Blog

How to Evaluate Learning: Kirkpatrick Model for the 21st Century—A Revision | Social Learning Blog | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Even though many Learning and Development organizations find it a challenge to prove training’s effect beyond how learners react to the training and whether they have learned the training content, senior management and business stakeholders are more and more interested in metrics that show the bottom line.

 

According to Donald L. Kirkpatrick’s Revised “Four Levels of Evaluation” model, what we need to do is find out what success looks like in the eyes of these senior managers and stakeholders and let them define their expectations for the training program. Then we need to identify specific metrics to demonstrate and deliver on those expectations.

 

For those of you who are not familiar with the original Four Levels, this is what they are:
> Level 1. Reaction: To what degree did the learners react favorably to the training experience?
> Level 2. Learning: To what degree did the learners acquire the intended knowledge, skills, and attitudes as a result of the training?
> Level 3. Behavior: To what degree did the learners apply what they learned back on the job?
> Level 4. Results: To what degree did the targeted outcomes occur as a result of the training experience and follow-up reinforcement?" - from source: http://www.dashe.com/blog/training-development/

NOTE: Assessment and success factors are usually difficult to identify well. This article with the accompanying chart does a good job in mapping out a process for evaluating the succes factors and ratings of Instructional Design. - ghbrett

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