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Parasite Inspires Surgical Patch

Parasite Inspires Surgical Patch | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

By mimicking a technique used by an intestinal parasite of fish, researchers have developed a flexible patch studded with microneedles that holds skin grafts in place more strongly than surgical staples do. After burrowing into the walls of a fish's intestines, the spiny-headed worm Pomphorhynchus laevis inflates its proboscis to better embed itself in the soft tissue. In the new patch (sample shown in main image), the stiff polystyrene core of the 700-micrometer-tall needles (inset) penetrates the tissue; then a thin hydrogel coating on the tip of each needle—a coating based on the material in disposable diapers that expands when it gets wet—swells to help anchor the patch in place. In tests using skin grafts, adhesion strength of the patch was more than three times higher than surgical staples, the researchers report online today in Nature Communications. Because the patch doesn't depend on chemical adhesives for its gripping power, there's less chance for patients to have an allergic reaction. And because the microneedles are about one-quarter the length of typical surgical staples, the patches cause less tissue damage when they're removed, the researchers contend. Besides holding grafts in place, the patch could be used to hold the sides of a wound or an incision together—even, in theory, ones inside the body if a slowly dissolving version of the patch can be developed. Moreover, the researchers say, the hydrogel coating holds promise as a way to deliver proteins, drugs, or other therapeutic substances to patients.


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Receptor for Tasting Fat is CD36

Receptor for Tasting Fat is CD36 | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
For the first time, a team of scientists at Washington University School of Medicine has identified a human receptor that can taste fat.

 

CD36 is a membrane protein found on the surface of many cell types in humans, mice, rats and many vertebrate animals. The findings also suggest that variations in the CD36 gene can make people more or less sensitive to the taste of fat.

 

“The ultimate goal is to understand how our perception of fat in food might influence what foods we eat and the quantities of fat that we consume,” said Dr. Nada Abumrad, senior investigator and the Dr. Robert A. Atkins Professor of Medicine and Obesity Research.

 

“In this study, we’ve found one potential reason for individual variability in how people sense fat. It may be, as was shown recently, that as people consume more fat, they become less sensitive to it, requiring more intake for the same satisfaction. What we will need to determine in the future is whether our ability to detect fat in foods influences our fat intake, which clearly would have an impact on obesity.”

 

The CD36 discovery follows research that had identified a role for the gene in rats and mice. Scientists had learned that when animals are genetically engineered without a working CD36 gene, they no longer display a preference for fatty foods. In addition, animals that can’t make the CD36 protein have difficulty digesting fat.

 

Up to 20 percent of people are believed to have the variant in the CD36 gene that is associated with making significantly less CD36 protein. That, in turn, could mean they are less sensitive to the presence of fat in food.

 

Dr. Abumrad was the first to identify CD36 as the protein that facilitates the uptake of fatty acids. She explained that better understanding of how the protein works in people could be important in the fight against obesity.

“Diet can affect sensitivity to fat, and in animals, diet also influences the amount of CD36 that’s made,” added Dr. Pepino. “If we follow the results in animals, a high-fat diet would lead to less production of CD36, and that, in turn, could make a person less sensitive to fat. From our results in this study, we would hypothesize that people with obesity may make less of the CD36 protein. So it would seem logical that the amounts of the protein we make can be modified, both by a person’s genetics and by the diet they eat.”


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Sahara solar plan loses its shine

Sahara solar plan loses its shine | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
Siemens’ decision to pull out of DESERTEC reignites doubts.
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Chip Makes Twisted Light for Communications - IEEE Spectrum

Chip Makes Twisted Light for Communications - IEEE Spectrum | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
Silicon IC could pack more bits onto optical fiber by sending the light on a twisted path...
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New Scientist TV: 3D fetus fly-through peers inside abnormal bodies

New Scientist TV: 3D fetus fly-through peers inside abnormal bodies | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
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Bacterial builders on site for computer construction - University of Leeds

Bacterial builders on site for computer construction - University of Leeds | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
University of Leeds News - Bacterial builders on site for computer construction - Forget computer viruses - magnet-making bacteria could be used to build tomorrow’s computers with larger hard drives and speedier connections.
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.

 

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".


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Arturo Pereira's curator insight, August 12, 2017 9:01 AM
The democratization of knowledge!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 11, 2017 2:42 AM
FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities
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Tough gel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and even heals itself

Tough gel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and even heals itself | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

A team of experts in mechanics, materials science, and tissue engineering at Harvard have created an extremely stretchy and tough gel that may pave the way to replacing damaged cartilage in human joints. Called a hydrogel, because its main ingredient is water, the new material is a hybrid of two weak gels that combine to create something much stronger. Not only can this new gel stretch to 21 times its original length, but it is also exceptionally tough, self-healing, and biocompatible—a valuable collection of attributes that opens up new opportunities in medicine and tissue engineering.


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Fico Ventilatory's comment, September 6, 2012 2:36 PM
This Reminds me that often, we need look no further than the kitchen for inspiration. risen BREAD works in much the same way as this Gel... Wheat gluten contains the composite proteins Gliadin and glutenin: One gives the bread it's Strength, the other it's elasticity, and the two are required in an exact ratio to make the Crusty, Fluffy European Breads we Westerners are most familiar with. (Gluten forms when glutenin molecules cross-link to form a sub-microscopic network attached to gliadin). I'll bet, from the sounds of it, this Gel works in much the same way.One needs to Look no Further than what's Extant in nature for inspiration: self-similarity is a Natural Law.
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.


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Arturo Pereira's curator insight, August 12, 2017 9:01 AM
The democratization of knowledge!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 11, 2017 2:42 AM
FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities
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What we exhale is unique to us – our 'breathprint' - health - 04 April 2013 - New Scientist

What we exhale is unique to us – our 'breathprint' - health - 04 April 2013 - New Scientist | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
Everyone's breath contains a distinctive set of metabolic compounds, so breath tests could be used to detect and monitor disease

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Noor Fatima's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:21 AM

INTERESTING.......

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2012's biggest moments in science

2012's biggest moments in science | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
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Genomics: The single life

Genomics: The single life | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
Sequencing DNA from individual cells is changing the way that researchers think of humans as a whole.
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Why wood pulp is world's new wonder material - tech - 23 August 2012 - New Scientist

Why wood pulp is world's new wonder material - tech - 23 August 2012 - New Scientist | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
Stronger than steel, cheap, and made from renewable wood pulp, nanocrystalline cellulose is a nanomaterial that's set to take the technological world by...
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Robot wheelchair climbs steps and elevates over obstacles (Wired UK)

Robot wheelchair climbs steps and elevates over obstacles (Wired UK) | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it
Mechanical engineers in Japan have developed a wheelchair that can climb steps and "walk" over obstacles while keeping the user level at all times...
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7 Websites For Science Questions & Answers For The Scientific Spirit

7 Websites For Science Questions & Answers For The Scientific Spirit | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

"The web is the Grand Oracle. It sees all and answers all. I wish we had the educational and self-learning edge it gives to today’s generation. In a snap, you can tap it to ask anything about the world we live in, and generally it is pretty accurate answering back. Perhaps, apart from the ‘question of life’ it can answer anything. Who knows, someone might come up with that answer too in due time. But for now, from the purely scientific point of view, you can ask away about life sciences…and all the associated disciplines.
We have our own platform for questions and answers, and that’s where a reader asked us about some good websites on questions related to science, particularly physics and chemistry? He got the help he needed. Perhaps, with the help of this post and the seven websites mentioned here, you will too...."


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World’s largest release of comprehensive human cancer genome data helps researchers to speed discoveries

World’s largest release of comprehensive human cancer genome data helps researchers to speed discoveries | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

Whole genome data from hundreds of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital patients exceeds volume of all other sources combined.

 

To speed progress against cancer and other diseases, the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital – Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project today announced the largest-ever release of comprehensive human cancer genome data for free access by the global scientific community. The amount of information released more than doubles the volume of high-coverage, whole genome data currently available from all human genome sources combined. This information is valuable not just to cancer researchers, but also to scientists studying almost any disease.

 

The 520 genome sequences released today are matched sets of normal and tumor tissue samples from 260 pediatric cancer patients. The Pediatric Cancer Genome Project is expected to sequence more than 1,200 genomes by year’s end. Each sample is sequenced at a quality control level known as 30-fold coverage, ensuring maximum accuracy. St. Jude researchers are analyzing the genomic sequences to determine the differences between each child’s normal and cancerous cells to pinpoint the causes of more than a half-dozen of the most deadly childhood cancers, an effort which has already produced a number of key discoveries reported in top scientific journals.


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A Car That Runs On Air: The Future Is Here?

A Car That Runs On Air: The Future Is Here? | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

the tiny car’s engine works by extracting air pressure from its 175-liter tank—and does not contribute to air pollution.


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Bacterial community inside the plant root: Plants choose soil bacteria that they allow into their roots

Bacterial community inside the plant root: Plants choose soil bacteria that they allow into their roots | Discover science and technology | Scoop.it

Soil is the most species-rich microbial ecosystem in the world. From this incredible diversity, plants specifically choose certain species, give them access to the root and so host a unique, carefully selected bacterial community from which they then benefit in a variety of ways. To achieve this, the plant's immune system must be able to tell which of these bacteria are friends and which foes.

 

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have now discovered that the model plant Arabidopsis preferentially takes up three bacterial phyla into its roots: Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. This community of microbes is dependent on soil type and plant genotype.

 

The scientists have been breaking new ground in plant science with their investigation. It is only in recent years that the significance of microbial communities has been receiving wider attention. Even humans have more microorganisms than cells inside them, which means that any living organism can be regarded as a metaorganism. Schulze-Lefert and his colleagues have conducted acensus of the Arabidopsis root and identified varying quantities of 43 bacterial phyla. It may therefore be concluded that Arabidopsis makes a selection of the inhabitants of its roots from the profusion of microorganisms in the soil.


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