Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan
2.8K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan
Educators help students recognize and understand the nuances of a discipline by using strategies that “make their thinking visible.” They promote classroom reading, writing, listening, speaking and critical thinking using authentic materials that support the development of content-specific knowledge and that transfer to real world situations.They guide students through these complex texts by using strategies that develop conceptual understanding of language and set expectations for relevant application of skills. This site includes resources of all kinds, including content knowledge resources, that lead to deeper disciplinary learning.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

The Effect of Creating Digital Storytelling on Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement, Self Efficacy Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Physics

The Effect of Creating Digital Storytelling on Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement, Self Efficacy Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Physics | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

"The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of Digital Storytelling (DST) on the (a) academic achievement, (b) attitude towards physics and (c) self efficacy perception of secondary school students. This study consists of an experimental group and a comparison group which are formed by equal number of students. The six-weeks study adopted a pretest and posttest experimental design involving 64 students in two physics classes taught by the same teacher. Digital story telling was additionally applied in experimental group. Nonparametric Tests have been used in the data analysis. Our findings indicate that DST participants performed significantly better than comparison group participants in terms of physics achievement. While in comparison group students‟ self-efficacy perceptions and attitudes toward physics decreased, in experimental group there was not any difference. "
The Effect of Creating Digital Storytelling on Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement, Self Efficacy Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Physics (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312128678_The_Effect_of_Creating_Digital_Storytelling_on_Secondary_School_Students%27_Academic_Achievement_Self_Efficacy_Perceptions_and_Attitudes_Toward_Physics [accessed Sep 28, 2017].

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Positive impact of Digital Storytelling on high school physics students!


Via THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Jim Lerman
more...
Stephania Savva, Ph.D's curator insight, March 4, 12:56 AM
Share your insight
THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY's curator insight, March 4, 2:06 AM

Digital storytelling is incredibly popular given the proliferation of new technologies. This paper discusses its use from the perspective of secondary students’ academic achievement, attitudes towards physics and self-efficacy perception. The findings from the experimental pretest and posttest design elicited important insights. DST participants seemed to benefit in terms of their physics performance. Students’ self-efficacy perceptions and attitudes towards physics did not show alteration for the experimental group.

 

Overall it appears that digital storytelling has a positive effect on learning and therefore more research is needed to explore and contribute to the field specifically in relation to critical, reflective and creative thinking and learning motivation and students’ engagement.

Gemma Ballarín's curator insight, March 4, 3:25 PM
Digital Storytelling on Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Tools for Educational Researchers
Scoop.it!

Science is a social process: facilitating community interactions across the research lifecycle

Science is a social process: facilitating community interactions across the research lifecycle | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Modern day research practice is incredibly collaborative, increasingly interdisciplinary and a very social process. Sierra Williams underlines the importance of researchers and publishers alike rec…

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cayo Scoop! The Ecology of Cayo Culture
Scoop.it!

UB Earth Day 2017

UB Earth Day 2017 | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

The University of Belize is having its 10th Earth Day celebration next Friday, April 28th.  Always a fun time, where one can learn about the environment, and how to protect it.

 

"UB is hosting its 10th Annual Earth Day Fair through the Natural Resource Management Program under the theme 'My Community, My Climate.'  The primary goal for this year’s event is to highlight the meaning of climate change and climate literacy by engaging primary, secondary and tertiary level students in environmental education programs.

On April, 28th come, enjoy and find out what UB’s Earth Day celebration is all about! We’ll have informational booths, the launch of a mural competition, interactive learning activities for children, prizes, music, fundraiser and more!

Also witness what Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s), Government Agencies, Private Businesses and especially what UB students in the NRM Department are doing for our environment!"


Via Best of Cayo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
Scoop.it!

Teaching science with engaging picture books

Teaching science with engaging picture books | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

"Melissa Stewart and Nancy Chesley's Perfect Pairs skillfully uses fiction and nonfiction life science books to supplement inquiry based learning in grades 3-5 ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
more...
Abdelrady's curator insight, January 23, 9:09 AM

Science teaching

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from :: The 4th Era ::
Scoop.it!

For Educators | Historic Jamestowne

For Educators | Historic Jamestowne | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

via The Scout Report

 

"In 1607, a group of 104 male settlers, led by Captain John Smith, established Fort James in what is now modern day Virginia. Today, the Jamestowne Rediscovery Society, a project of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, is dedicated to researching the first permanent English settlement in North America and to educating the public about the "dramatic story" of Jamestown's establishment and demise. Visitors will find a number of resources for teaching and learning about Jamestown on this page. Nine lesson plans have been designed to engage elementary, middle, and high school students with the story of Jamestown, while encouraging student interest in the practice of historical and archeological inquiry. For example, How to Think Like an Archeologist, a lesson aimed at upper elementary school students, facilitates an introduction to the field of archeology via an examination of grocery store receipts. While some of these lesson plans are designed to prepare students for a visit to the settlement, many of these lessons may be implemented in classrooms around the world without an accompanying field trip. Readers will also find a link to the organization's YouTube page, which features a number of short videos about ongoing archeology efforts at the site of the former settlement."


Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures

The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
I’ve compiled several “The Best…” lists that sites where you can learn about the geography, data, languages, and holidays of different countries around the world. Those reso…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 4, 7:01 AM
Change the cultural divide
Ericka Wheeler's curator insight, January 5, 9:03 PM

Diversity has always been a passion of mine and I love learning about people and cultures. What a great resource.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cool School Ideas
Scoop.it!

Newsela Connects All Students to Historical Readings

Newsela Connects All Students to Historical Readings | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Newsela has some awesome new content that is of particular interest to social studies and history teachers. For those of you unfamiliar with Newsela, it is a website that adapts the text complexity…
Via Cindy Riley Klages
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Learning*Education*Technology
Scoop.it!

Two Good Sets of Animated Maps for U.S. History Students

Two Good Sets of Animated Maps for U.S. History Students | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Creating my earlier post about resources for learning about Pearl Harbor prompted me to revisit a couple of animated maps of U.S

Via Skip Zalneraitis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literacy in a digital world
Scoop.it!

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
A neurological study has shown that curiosity makes our brains more receptive for learning, and that as we learn, we enjoy the sensation of learning.

Via Sue Ward
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from STEM Connections
Scoop.it!

Scientists go big with first aquatic species map for US West

Scientists go big with first aquatic species map for US West | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Scientists plan to create a biodiversity map identifying thousands of aquatic species in every river and stream in the western U.S. It will be available by next summer.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from AdLit
Scoop.it!

Diving Deep Into Nonfiction, Grades 6-12: Transferable Tools for Reading ANY Nonfiction Text (Corwin Literacy): Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Michael W. (William) Smith: 9781483386058: Amazon.com: Books

Diving Deep Into Nonfiction, Grades 6-12: Transferable Tools for Reading ANY Nonfiction Text (Corwin Literacy) [Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Michael W. (William) Smith] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. “General reading strategies and teacher-developed questions will only take our students so far—with our approach
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from AdLit
Scoop.it!

A Historical Writing Apprenticeship for Adolescents: Integrating Disciplinary Learning With Cognitive Strategies - De La Paz - 2016 - Reading Research Quarterly - Wiley Online Library

A Historical Writing Apprenticeship for Adolescents: Integrating Disciplinary Learning With Cognitive Strategies - De La Paz - 2016 - Reading Research Quarterly - Wiley Online Library | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference

"In the mid-20th century we began launching satellites into space that would help us determine the exact circumference of the Earth: 40,030 km. But over 2000 years earlier, a man in Ancient Greece came up with nearly the exact same figure using just a stick and his brain."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2016 1:19 PM

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge (additionally, here is a retro Carl Sagan in a video clip from Cosmos that inspired this clip).    

 

Tagsmapping, math, locationSTEM, historical.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 2016 3:07 AM
How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

How to Use Data to Tell a Stronger Story

How to Use Data to Tell a Stronger Story | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Data visualizations that don't communicate a larger story don't succeed. Here's how to balance your data, design, and messaging.
Via Mike Nach, Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

History Lessons Blend Content Knowledge, Literacy

History Lessons Blend Content Knowledge, Literacy | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
As school prepare for changes under the Common Core, some educators are turning to a program that strengthens students' history knowledge and reading comprehension.

For years, bands of educators have been trying to free history instruction from the mire of memorization and propel it instead with the kinds of inquiry that drive historians themselves. Now, the common-core standards may offer more impetus for districts and schools to adopt that brand of instruction.
A study of one such approach suggests that it can yield a triple academic benefit: It can deepen students’ content knowledge, help them think like historians, and also build their reading comprehension.
The Reading Like a Historian program, a set of 75 free secondary school lessons in U.S. history, is getting a new wave of attention as teachers adapt to the Common Core State Standards in English/language arts. Those guidelines, adopted by all but four states, demand that teachers of all subjects help students learn to master challenging nonfiction and build strong arguments based on evidence.
Searching for ways to teach those literacy skills across the curriculum, while building students’ content knowledge and thinking skills, some educators have turned to that program. Designed under the tutelage of history educator Sam Wineburg, it has been downloaded from the website of the research project he directs, the Stanford History Education Group, more than 330,000 times in the past 2½ years.
“It completely changed the way I teach history, and my students are getting so much more out of it,” said Terri Camajani, who teaches U.S. history and government at Washington High School in San Francisco. “They get really into it. And their reading level just jumps; you can see it in their writing,” she said.

A photo of slaves is reviewed by students at Sunnyvale Middle School as they learn about slavery in America.
—Ramin Rahimian for Education Week
Ms. Camajani was one of the teachers involved in a 2008 experiment that gauged the impact of Reading Like a Historian lessons on 11th graders in 10 San Francisco high school classes. Teachers in half the classrooms had been trained to use the lessons; those in the other half did not use them. After six months, students using the program outperformed those in the control group in factual knowledge, reading comprehension, and a suite of analytical and strategic skills dubbed “historical thinking.”
Avishag Reisman, who led the curriculum development and the study as part of her doctoral work at Stanford University under Mr. Wineburg, said the program “seems to hit a number of important goals. Literacy skills: got that. Higher-level thinking and domain-specific reading: got that. And basic facts: got that, too. Students did better on the nuts and bolts because they were embedded in meaningful instruction.”
And they did better even though their teachers “didn’t always implement the lessons with the highest level of fidelity,” said Ms. Reisman, who published her findings last fall and winter in two journals, the Journal of Curriculum Studies and Cognition and Instruction. That suggests, she said, that improved professional development could produce even stronger results.
Going to the Source
The program takes primary-source documents as its centerpiece and shifts textbooks into a supporting role. Each lesson begins with a question, such as, “How should we remember the dropping of the atomic bomb?” or “Did Pocahontas save John Smith’s life?” Students must dig into letters, articles, speeches, and other documents to understand events and develop interpretations buttressed by evidence from what they read.
Teachers trained in the approach focus heavily on four key skills: “sourcing,” to gauge how authors’ viewpoints and reasons for writing affect their accounts of events; “contextualization,” to get a full picture of what was happening at the time; “corroboration,” to help students sort out contradictory anecdotes and facts; and “close reading,” to help them absorb text slowly and deeply, parsing words and sentences for meaning.


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Tips for Setting Up AP History DBQ Essays

Tips for Setting Up AP History DBQ Essays | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Tom Richey has a great YouTube channel for history students and teachers. In addition to lessons on a wide variety of topics in U.S. an
Via Javier Sánchez Bolado, Jim Lerman
more...
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Our National Parks--On The Trail: Year's end

Conor Knighton is winding up his year-long journey through our National Parks. He's returned with a backpack full of picture postcards, along with som
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Education for Sustainable Development
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Could Kill the World's Oldest Trees

Climate Change Could Kill the World's Oldest Trees | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Ancient bristlecone pine trees could be outcompeted by other tree species, thanks to climate change.

Via Sarantis Chelmis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

3 Great Websites for Elementary Science Teachers

3 Great Websites for Elementary Science Teachers | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Below are three interesting science resources selected specifically for elementary teachers. These websites provide teachers with a wide variety of educational materials to help young kids enjoy science learning. These include lesson plans, video tutorials, animated explanations, presentations, graphic organizers, interactive games and many more.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

Social Studies In Action: Dealing with Controversial Issues

A guide for viewing Social Studies in Action, a video library of classroom practices.
Via Sharrock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Aggeliki Nikolaou
Scoop.it!

How Failure and Solving Real Problems Helps This School Thrive

How Failure and Solving Real Problems Helps This School Thrive | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Teachers at the STEM School Chattanooga push students to do their best work through questioning strategies that they've often learned by being coached.

Via Aggeliki Nikolaou
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

‘Makerspaces’ for science instruction also proving helpful for English learners

‘Makerspaces’ for science instruction also proving helpful for English learners | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

Educators are finding that the new “makerspace” movement – a strategy to teach K-12 students science, math and technology through hands-on activities – is providing the added benefit of helping English learners become more proficient in the language.

"In makerspaces, students gather a few times a week in a separate classroom, library or museum for a group project using such technologies and materials as 3D printing, robotics, microprocessors, textiles, wood and wires to construct robots and other electronic gadgets. The teaching technique has been around since the early 2000s, and educators have applauded the idea for helping teach science, especially at a time when California and other states are phasing in the Next Generation Science Standards, which emphasize practical application of science over rote learning.

"But now experts are also seeing makerspaces as a valuable tool for helping improve English, as children talk through their work in teams and keep journals to record their progress."


Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Purposeful Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

A great resource to teach science through animated videos and hands-on activities

A great resource to teach science through animated videos and hands-on activities | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

"Mosa Mack is an interesting resource for science teachers and students. Mosa Mack provides students with a variety of short animated mysteries that they have to solve using knowledge gleaned from videos they watch ..."


Via Leona Ungerer, Dean J. Fusto
more...
Karen Girdler's curator insight, May 6, 6:15 PM
This is an incredible resource for teaching science in Junior Secondary.  It provides lessons that progressively move up the levels of Blooms Taxonomy.  With the free version you choose one topic to trial.  Complete lesson plans, video's, work sheets, hands on activities, worksheets and differentiation ideas are all provided.  All the work has been done to deliver engaging, ICT rich lessons that encourage higher order thinking and problem based learning.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

Make Writing a Daily Ritual in Every Subject by Mary Tedrow

Make Writing a Daily Ritual in Every Subject by Mary Tedrow | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Students should write every day in every class, says project director Mary Tedrow, who shares some of the techniques she uses to refine a daily writing habit.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

National Resources

National Resources | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Overview  This section includes a variety of resources created by national organizations and institutions with the goal of providing background information and resources on disciplinary literacy practices.
more...
No comment yet.