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Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
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The Best Rewards Programs Give You More Than Points

The Best Rewards Programs Give You More Than Points | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The most common type of loyalty program is what could be referred to, in Collins’ words, as “earn and burn” — i.e., programs that allow shoppers to collect and eventually spend points (or cash), rather than being able to keep and benefit from markers of their loyalty long term.

But the fact that a lot of loyalty programs basically just offer more money back, or points, is part of the issue: It’s so commonplace that it’s not exactly a reward. “Promotions at a mass level have become so accepted that they’re almost demanded by consumers in order to shop in the first place,” says Nikki Baird, an analyst at RSR Research.

Given that consumers also have a desire to save money, it can make sense for an apparel company to dive into discounts as a way to amp up a loyalty program — buy-some-get-money-back is a pretty common type of loyalty program (like Loft’s Love LOFT rewards program, driven by its credit card, or American Eagle/Aerie’s program, which has some member perks, but primarily operates by redeeming points for cash and getting extra jeans or bras for buying a certain amount of said product) — but despite the potential perks or popularity, that could be just another mechanism for promotions, an already dangerous trend in the retail industry.
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7 Pillars of a Strong Culture 

7 Pillars of a Strong Culture  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Culture should really stand on the following seven pillars:

Mission: describes the business you are in, i.e., what you’re doing and who you’re serving.
Vision: defines where the company wants to go in the future.
Values: the fundamental beliefs of the organization that guide your employees, identifying right and wrong, good and bad, and how to interact with each other and with customers. If there were no other pillars – and all you had was values – you’d still have a pretty solid foundation for your culture.
Guiding Principles: are more specific than values in how they guide the organization through everything it does; they are more prescriptive in nature. Principles are objective “truths” or “laws,” while values are subjective and provide a sense of direction.
Purpose: the company’s reason for being, the why. It’s typically stated in such a way that helps employees understand who the business is trying to impact and in what way.
Legend: if we tell the story about how the company started or where it came from, it creates a connection for employees, perhaps similar to purpose; it lets them feel how special and unique the company was/is and encourages them to carry that legacy forward, every day.
Behavior: driven by all of the above, but especially by values/principle.
When culture truly stands on these pillars, it’s really most strongly reflected in the seventh one, behavior. You can have the other six in place, but if what employees and executives actually do doesn’t align with any of them, then it’s a big culture fail.

Behavior is reinforced in the following:

People: it starts with hiring the right people, those whose values and purpose align with the organization’s values and purpose. Culture fit is no joke. Hire for attitude; train for skill.
Executive Alignment: executives are not exempt from culture fit, and they certainly must all be on the same page when it comes to each of the seven pillars, the goals of the business, and how the business should be run. Key for executives is to lead by example, to model the behavior that they wish to see from their employees; if they don’t live the values, why should employees?!
Servant Leadership: leaders within the organization must always put people first and recognize that their employees’ needs come before their own. This should be a basic tenet of any culture.
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How to recognize and stop toxic time-wasters

How to recognize and stop toxic time-wasters | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Blindsiding

Those who blindside use timing to their advantage, not to yours. For example, they smile before telling you something that sounds like vicious gossip, like you are the laughingstock of the office. They finish with “I just thought you needed to know.” Or they invite you to a friendly lunch but have a hidden agenda. For example, early in my career, I was invited to lunch by a friend who said he wanted to introduce me to someone who would benefit by some of my corporate training. The real intention was to get me into a network marketing downline.
A five-point checklist to identify blindsiding
You are often caught off-guard by the conversation or the language.
The other person discounts or belittles you.
You don’t feel safe around this person.
You don’t trust this person.
The person gossips about others behind their backs.
What to do: Ask for the agenda before the conversation. If you are invited to a phone call or a lunch meeting, ask in advance, “What is our objective for the meeting?” Then at the phone call or meeting if you see the conversation heading in another direction, say this: “I thought our agenda was to discuss ...” When caught off-guard, take a five-second pause and then question the intention of their statement. Take control of blindsiding by preparing in advance.
Monopolizing

The Monopolizer is long winded and can’t get to his point.  You wonder if there’s an end to the story. Caller ID was created for those who want to avoid the Monopolizer. If you ask the Monopolizer a “yes or no” question, he starts out with “It depends," and then goes into a 20-minute story before the story. You can yawn, you can tap your fingers but the Monopolizer is like the Energizer Bunny. He keeps going and going.
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To Succeed You Must Get Really Good at This First – Innovation Excellence

To Succeed You Must Get Really Good at This First – Innovation Excellence | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Suspending Disbelief
When my daughter was six years old I started coaching her in a program called Destination Imagination. It’s a creative problem-solving program that teaches kids how to think creatively by giving them challenges that involve building, performance, and teamwork. It’s basically a boot camp for overcoming obstacles.
In her fifth year of the program their challenge was to build a structure out of 13 grams of wood that would support the maximum weight possible. That’s the equivalent of three standard pencils.
The reactions from the kids to these challenges always followed three phases.
First there was, “Huh, that’s impossible!”
Second, there was, “Wait, what if we do this?”
Third, there was, “Aha, if we combine this way and that way it might just work!”
When they had finally figured out a way to solve the challenge I’d praise them for their ingenuity and then I’d say, “That’s great. Now, make it better!”
Their initial reaction was always, “But how are we going to do that?” Most often even I wasn’t sure how, but even if I did have an idea Destination Imagination has a strict policy of non-interference from anyone outside the team, especially adults. They had to figure it out on their own. I’d watch them fail over and over at ideas I knew would not work. But then they’d come up with something I was convinced was absolutely ridiculous–amazingly, it would work!
Over the years I got accustomed to suspending my disbelief and they got accustomed to just blowing through failure after failure, unfazed and unfrazzled, bouncing off of obstacles like little amoebas looking for their way through a maze.
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Hire the Best People with These 6 Interview Questions 

1. Are you driven by the determination to succeed or the fear of failure?
There is no right answer to this question. What I’m looking for is what motivates this person to work hard. I do not judge ambition; it comes in many forms. Notice, by the way, that I’m asking if fear of failure “drives” him or her, not “paralyzes.” See the next question for more on that.
2. Why are you successful?
Successful people think a great deal about what they are doing and why. They always have a definitive and purposeful answer to why they have been successful. They also have a deep need for success that always eclipses their fears.
3. If today were your last day on earth, what would you most regret not having accomplished?
Regrets are horrible bedfellows. I’ve found that people who live with a keen awareness of what they need to accomplish are driven to be creative and resourceful; yes, they’re exactly who I want on my team. By the way, one of my favorite responses to this question was from a candidate who was also a private pilot: “Can you give me an approximate altitude above the Earth?”
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Snuff out SWOT – Forever 

Snuff out SWOT – Forever  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
if you start your strategy efforts with a SWOT, without having an explicit, and explicitly different, strategic choice, the poor schmo who’s actually doing that SWOT has to decide what to pay attention to and what to ignore. The reason being, it’s impossible to do a SWOT analysis of everything. That’s a century-long assignment of a million or so pages in length, and our young MBA only has six weeks and 250 pages to do his SWOT.
And the easiest thing for the SWOTer to do? Assume the current strategy. “Given our current plan, our SWOT looks like this.”
Which is why most “new” strategies end up looking a lot like the “old” strategy.
I used to be agnostic on SWOT. No longer. I’m violently against it as the starting point for strategy.
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Make your inner voice your friend, not your foe

Make your inner voice your friend, not your foe | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The mind affects behavior. Our thinking patterns are like well-developed muscles. It takes time and focus to train and adjust them to new movements, new thoughts and messages.
Make your inner voice your friend by changing out the old messages for newer, more powerful and enabling ones. Here are some ways to do this:
Think back to a time when you were successful. Remember what it took on your part to create that success. Write down the key message or takeaway from that success, such as, “I am really good at leading the team” or “I bring years of experience in this area (strategic thinking, or planning, or risk management, whatever area you see).”
Pull out old feedback or a 360-degree report. Read through and focus on what others have identified as your strengths. Craft a new message to replace an old limiting belief.
Keep an accomplishments log. Do you have a "brag folder" or a place where you can save glowing/complimentary feedback emails? If not, start one. If so, pull them out and read. Develop new and empowering messages. Each time the old, limiting messages surface in your head, stop and insert the new message.
We are bombarded with negativity, and those tapes are easy to hear especially when we are stressed or facing big challenges and opportunities. You have to go in search of the good stuff. So, find it, have it ready, craft a new tape, and let it make you more confident and assertive.
Don’t let the old tapes limit you. There are more than enough external hurdles in our path.
Prevent your thinking patterns from being the formidable foes they can be. Make your inner voice your friend -- and win.
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How to Deal With Failure in Your Career 

How to Deal With Failure in Your Career  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Do Not Get Affected By Others’ Opinions

Often we take our failures too seriously because we are afraid of being judged by people. The fear of embarrassment and losing the respect in social circles impact your mental state more than the frustration of failure. You need to understand that what others think about your abilities and skills is not necessarily true. Focusing on how other people perceive your setback will only decrease your confidence in your talent and passion to succeed. Remember, it is your opinion of you that matters the most!

Evaluate the Reason behind the Failure

Once you have given yourself enough time to get over the situation, you should focus on learning from that experience. Evaluate the entire flow of events critically and identify the moves that went wrong. Establish the need for further learning, if any, and mitigate the shortcomings in your professional expertise that could have been the reason for the setback. Discuss the scope of improvement with your mentors and seniors to make sure you do not repeat the same things in future.

Do Not Compromise on Your Goals

When you’ve recently experienced a setback, it is easy to lose sight of what is important for you. Many people consider a failure as the end of their professional career and get totally disconnected from what they want to achieve. Avoid taking any rash decisions about switching jobs or taking up projects which are not suited for your skills. If you compromise with your values and goals, you will regret it more than the distress you are feeling at the moment.
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Strategy by metaphor

Strategy by metaphor | digitalNow | Scoop.it
A good metaphor helps you pour the confusion you’re facing into a container you can examine and see if anything settles out. It can be used to understand a challenge, frame an opportunity, define a market or identify a new direction. It’s a fruitful way to generate strategic options you may not have thought of before, even if some of them are nonsensical.
Creativity is often simply the combination of two previously unrelated ideas, so it can indeed be enlightening to ask, “How could we apply the Uber model to our industry?” Or “Could we develop a pricing platform like Amazon Prime?” Or “How would Apple package our product?” The possibilities are limited only by the comparisons you can conceive, which is why metaphors can be such a helpful tool.
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Leave No Doubt Leaders

Do you view the development of trust and relationship equity as mission critical items of your personal leadership philosophy? Are you committed to investing the time required to truly get to know your people on a deeper level? When you know your people and what they value, you have placed yourself in a perfect position to be able to inspire and lead. The key is you must also be vulnerable enough to allow them to get to know you in return. 

My past interactions and experiences with leaders from around the globe have led me to formulate the belief that most leaders don't truly know their people.
Here were my five questions for leaders:

1. Do you know your team member’s most important individual dreams?
2. Do you know your team member’s top three personal goals?

3. Do you know what one individual has been the most positive center of influence in your team member’s life?

4. Do you know your team member’s viewpoint of his or her greatest strength?

5. Do you know your team member’s personal core values?
Knowing the answers to these questions is critical in helping you build relationship equity and trust, which will also help you maximize your leadership ability with your team members. In order to build real relationship equity, you must display morally courageous leadership principles. It takes courage to establish trust and allow your people to move forward without doubt and fear. The morally courageous leader knows that his or her team members will make mistakes as they strive to perform. When you leave no doubt that you will be there to support and encourage them, even through their mistakes, it sets them free to succeed. 

A leader must invest the time required to truly know his or her team members. A truism of life is that people will work harder to reach their own goals and dreams than they will for anything else. When you care enough to find out what matter
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Fighting Cyber-Threats With Innovative Tech

Fighting Cyber-Threats With Innovative Tech | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Increasingly sophisticated and dangerous cyber-threats require more innovative security approaches, including advanced automation tools, AI and blockchain.


The complexities of today's cyber-security environment aren't lost on anyone. It's increasingly difficult to spot threats, detect intrusions, and thwart hackers and cyber-thieves.

"A cruise through the latest headlines about breaches is sobering," says Lisa O'Connor, managing director and leader of Accenture Cybersecurity Research. "The sophistication level and the amount of data that folks are going after is frightening. Many of these events are concerted efforts to steal data, undermine organizations, and monetize information and intellectual capital."

To be sure, it's a critical time for businesses, government, educational institutions and others. Despite years of ratcheting up security and plugging holes, cyber-crooks continue to break into systems and steal data. A list of recent breaches includes prominent companies such as Equifax, Hyatt, Deloitte, Whole Foods and Pizza Hut.

Ponemon Institute reports that the average cost of a data breach now stands at $3.62 million. In 2017, the average number of lost or stolen records resulting from data breaches rose by 1.8 percent over the previous year. The mean time to identify and contain a breach now stands at 191 days.
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5 Things Every Aspiring CEO Should Know, From The Coach Who Groomed Disney's Bob Iger

5 Things Every Aspiring CEO Should Know, From The Coach Who Groomed Disney's Bob Iger | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Boards want insiders as leaders

One big trend that’s transforming corporate governance is a shift towards promoting from within. “Today, companies almost always favor insiders, much more so than in the past,” says Feigen. “When boards recruit from the outside, it’s almost always where the company is under-performing.”

Feigen’s annual survey, The Feigen Advisers New CEO Report, follows trends among arriving and retiring CEOs in the S&P 250, and the most recent edition confirms his observation. Of the 81 newly named CEOs at those companies from 2014 through 2016, 62 were “lifers” who’d spent most of their careers with the company. Another 10 had been hired primarily as CEO candidates, and served several years at the company before being appointed. So overall, over those three years, 89% of the new leaders (72 out of 81) were insiders.

The main reason: “Boards reckon that the markets are changing far too fast for a newcomer to learn the business on-the-job,” says Feigen. “Even if the CEO is an outsider in the same industry, it could take them two years to master the nuances of the new company’s markets, whereas an executive who’s been running a major division can grab the baton at full stride.”
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Overcoming Strategy Communication Pitfalls

Overcoming Strategy Communication Pitfalls | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Pitfall #1: Relying on town hall meetings and emails

When leaders perceive the goal in execution is only to notify everyone about the new strategy, then they believe holding a town hall meeting or email will suffice. In one example, a regional manager of a medical supplier delivered eight two-hour 160-slide presentations around his region. But when someone in a session asked him a question afterward, he replied, “I showed you that in the presentation.” In this regional manger’s mind, he had explained the strategy and was done.

Many leaders are guilty of communicating across too few mediums. They provide too little information and their people don’t understand why the organization must transform, so they don’t take any new actions.

The aim is not to launch the strategy but to nurture the communications throughout the implementation journey.

Pitfall #2: “Strategy Speak” – Overcomplicating communication

Leaders sometimes overcomplicate what they’re saying, making it hard for people to understand even the simplest message. They have a bad habit of using “strategy speak”—saying popular expressions and giving long explanations rather than speaking simply and directly.

To be effective, leaders communicate the strategy in a way that enables people to understand what’s changing.
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Top 6 predictions for data and analytics in 2018

Data is and will remain the top digital currency

Data is set to become an even bigger “currency” for businesses, with value to buy, sell or lose. Beyond the disruptions we have seen caused by next generation technology, new processes, business models, and even new organisations are looking at how to monetise data as an asset.

Preventing data lakes from being data swamps will remain a priority

Consumers will be expecting a more tailored experience as well as services. Delivering these requires an agile platform that can provide both analytical and operational processing, so brands will be looking for SaaS partners that can help manage this.

Data analytical skills will be on the rise

In order to do so, the right set of talents will be required. While data analysts are still in demand, the rise in machine learning within AI means software which provides some of these analytical skills will be readily available. They will be easier to use than some of the legacy systems we’ve seen in the past, which still require some degree of technical knowledge. Talent who will ask ‘why’ and search for meaning in the data beyond just the extraction of insights will be highly valued.

Data Storytelling will take centre stage.

With the advent of the aforementioned-technology, comes the focus on data storytelling. Stakeholders will no longer just want reports that display cold hard numbers; they will expect to know the how and why, in order to make decisions and create a strategy that consistently delivers the desired results. To achieve this, brands will need to work on data storytelling to make sense of the numbers and present it in a way that speaks to people.
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3 Marketing and Sales Mistakes that Limit Growth and How to Avoid Them 

3 Marketing and Sales Mistakes that Limit Growth and How to Avoid Them  | digitalNow | Scoop.it

A) Unsynchronized sales and marketing goals

It may seem harmless, but many organizations do not incline the sales and marketing goals leading to numerous hassles. According to a survey by TAS Group, companies part away with 10% of revenue due to inconsistent policies.

The typical cues are infrequent conflicts that arise from improper structuring. Many CEOs choose to refrain from further investigation by dismissing them as a trivial impediment. Another possible reason is that marketing relationships are rarely seen on the lines of priority engagement. Rather than nurturing conversation, lead generation is considered to be a responsibility that changes hands from one department to another until conversion.

Avoid misalignment using these steps:

Plan the goals in advance

Prepare long term plans right off the bat. Get familiar with the definitions without further ado.
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How to Write Well: 10 Timeless Rules 

How to Write Well: 10 Timeless Rules  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The Memo

“The better you write, the higher you will go,” Ogilvy wrote in a memo to his management team. “People who think well, write well.”

The note, drafted in 1982, later appeared in The Unpublished David Ogilvy, a collection of incisive letters and speeches by the man hailed as “The Father of Advertising.”

“Good writing is not a natural gift,” he writes. “You have to learn to write well.”

How to Write Well

He closed out the memo with “10 hints” that anyone could apply to make their writing better.

I’ve transcribed his suggestions below, along with some modern context:

1) "Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times."

Full disclosure: Kenneth Roman, Joel Raphaelson, and David Ogilvy were cronies. In fact, Roman served as the agency’s CEO, which explains the front-and-center mention of his book. That said, it’s still a great business-writing resource.

Aside from the knowledge you’ll glean from Writing That Works, reading it over and over and over will acquaint you with the voice, tone, and style of two excellent writers. The more good writing you read, the more good you’ll internalize. The more good you internalize from others, the easier it’ll be to spot and correct the bad in your own writing.

TAKEAWAY: Good writing is the product of prolific reading.
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The Curse of the Halfway Technology

The Curse of the Halfway Technology | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Yes, it’s Day 1. We’re not there yet. But the fact of not being there means we still have choices to contemplate and decisions to make. (One choice is net neutrality, which is featured in Yu’s most recent film on the inventor of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee.) It might be the case that the World Wide Web and the Internet of Things actually don’t need to Borg the globe and that SPELL and other localized, human-attuned technologies can satisfy the necessity for equitable access that such a profound piece of infrastructure must provide. Maybe there are options for the design of these technologies that take users’ sensibilities into greater account and research agendas for A.I. in which “smart” means helpful to many rather than triumphant über alles. Technologies don’t have designated, predetermined endpoints. And these choices and decisions mean that engaging in criticism of technology and innovation is not Luddism, but rather a constructive enterprise that must happen if we don’t want to get stuck, encased in our technology, rather than liberated by it.
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Fighting Cyber-Threats With Innovative Tech

Fighting Cyber-Threats With Innovative Tech | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The complexities of today's cyber-security environment aren't lost on anyone. It's increasingly difficult to spot threats, detect intrusions, and thwart hackers and cyber-thieves.

"A cruise through the latest headlines about breaches is sobering," says Lisa O'Connor, managing director and leader of Accenture Cybersecurity Research. "The sophistication level and the amount of data that folks are going after is frightening. Many of these events are concerted efforts to steal data, undermine organizations, and monetize information and intellectual capital."

To be sure, it's a critical time for businesses, government, educational institutions and others. Despite years of ratcheting up security and plugging holes, cyber-crooks continue to break into systems and steal data. A list of recent breaches includes prominent companies such as Equifax, Hyatt, Deloitte, Whole Foods and Pizza Hut.

Ponemon Institute reports that the average cost of a data breach now stands at $3.62 million. In 2017, the average number of lost or stolen records resulting from data breaches rose by 1.8 percent over the previous year. The mean time to identify and contain a breach now stands at 191 days.

Studies show that about 80 percent of organizations are affected by cyber-attacks. The takeaway? Cyber-security isn't only the job of a chief security officer (CSO) or chief information security officer (CISO). It's something that must span all corners of the enterprise—and beyond its walls.
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This Is How Your Business Will Be Disrupted

The principles of running a business are fairly straightforward. You create clear objectives, achieve them efficiently and try to get better as you go. Business school professors have fancy names for this stuff, like “strategic DNA,” “core competencies” and “continuous improvement,” but in a nutshell all that stuff means is that you try to do things better, faster and cheaper.
The problem comes when you find yourself running a square-peg business in a round-hole world. When that happens, following traditional best practices will only result in getting better and better at doing things people want less and less. Round holes don’t care how good your square pegs are or how efficiently you can produce them.
Make no mistake. Eventually, every business finds itself in a round hole world. That’s why good companies fail. Not because they somehow become stupid and lazy all of a sudden, but because the world changes and they lose relevance. Then those same practices that led to success now lead to failure. We need to learn to prepare for a future we cannot yet see.
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How to Deal With Failure in Your Career - CEOWORLD magazine

How to Deal With Failure in Your Career - CEOWORLD magazine | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Life is never an easy ride. At some point or another, we have to deal with failures. Be it in our education, career, relationships, or any other walk of life. While it is very easy to give in to the grief and self-doubt, you need to keep calm and accept it gracefully.

If you have recently experienced a failure in your career, here are some tips to help you deal with it in a positive manner: 

Remember That It Is Not Personal

One failure does not mean that you do not have the potential to be successful. Do not let one setback bring down your confidence in yourself. Avoid blaming your personality and characteristics for the letdown. An important part of it is to acknowledge that you made a mistake and own up to it. Try to separate the failure from your identity and focus on how to make sure it never happens.
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Fighting Cyber-Threats With Innovative Tech

Fighting Cyber-Threats With Innovative Tech | digitalNow | Scoop.it

Automating Activities and Tasks

How can an organization adopt a more advanced and innovative approach to cyber-security? How can security teams mitigate threats in a world where there are no borders for data and connectivity? Basic firewalls, malware protection, intrusion detection and packet filtering are no longer adequate.

"You have to look for ways to automate activities and tasks," explains Paul Hill, a senior consultant at SystemExperts, an independent security consulting firm. "You can't shut down a set of IP addresses every time an attack occurs without interfering with the business or completely shutting it down. You can't depend on whitelisting and blacklisting when the same attacks stream in from different machines and IP addresses."

Various automation tools, solutions and technologies—along with well-conceived processes—can help security teams move beyond a reactive mode. Organizations are suddenly able to collect and correlate data rapidly, and from a wide variety of sources, while maintaining confidentiality of data, Hills explains.

These automation systems can rapidly identify the source of an attack and can aid in deploying critical patches, updates and other remediation tactics faster than attacks can spread. Likewise, they detect infections or intrusions faster than attackers can exfiltrate data.

AI is a crucial piece of the automation puzzle, Hill adds. Emerging deep learning and machine learning tools can spot abnormal or suspicious behavior in log information and network flow data. This typically includes firewall logs, load balancer logs, operating system logs, application logs, and other data that often wind up in a traditional System for Cross-domain Identity Management (SCIM) system.

In addition, Accenture's O'Conner advises keeping an eye on an emerging area of machine learning that revolves around data classifications. "Many organizations have no idea what value their structured and unstructured data have, and yet they have to apply the right security to the data." Other emerging areas for AI include penetration testing and spotting social engineering attacks.

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The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations

The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Realistically, not all employees need to engage in strategic thinking (although that would be nice). This question of who in an organization should be thinking about strategy can be reframed as: Who is responsible for strategy? In a startup or small company we look upward for strategy. The danger is that as companies scale, we continue to look up to the company’s most senior leaders for strategic direction. Yet, as the organization grows, these senior leaders can become distant from the details of the business and emerging trends affecting it — and that can hinder their ability to make the best strategic decisions.
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8 Terrible Mistakes You Are Making At Work - And How To Fix Them Instantly 

8 Terrible Mistakes You Are Making At Work - And How To Fix Them Instantly  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Mistake #1 – You resist change

Tony Robbins, the renowned American author, and life coach, once said, “Change is inevitable. Progress is optional”. You may or may not ‘want’ to change, but you ‘have’ to change. There’s nothing in this world that could stay the same. Nothing. So, why do you resist change at the workplace? Remember that life is continuously changing. You can’t always stay in the same place, department or role as you want. Choose to change, and your life will be better.

Mistake #2 – You are always on your desk

If you are someone who could always be found at their desk, then don’t be that person. It is harmful to not only your career but to your overall health as well. When you sit at your desk all day long and don’t even take a break, then your colleagues, seniors may not notice your presence. You engage less with others and unknowingly sabotage your career. Secondly, sitting at your desk for the entire day doesn’t help you increase your productivity. Studies have revealed that taking frequent breaks makes people more productive by helping them to concentrate on their tasks better. Therefore, move. Take short walks and come back to work. You will be more alert and a better employee.
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Why Businesses Lose Their Best Job Candidates

Why Businesses Lose Their Best Job Candidates | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The quality of interactions that a job candidate experiences with a prospective employer can ultimately determine whether that individual decides to work for the company in question. And, given the shortage of qualified talent in today's job market, businesses can't afford to miss out on top prospects, Given this, findings from a recent survey from Phenom People reveal that a surprisingly high percentage of businesses fall short in creating a positive job application experience. The resulting "2017: The State of Talent Relationship Marketing" report reveals that the vast majority of candidates don't receive status updates once they apply for a position. Very few companies provide relevant and personalized content and job recommendations for users on the career/jobs site. And most online applications can't be prefilled beyond just the basics: name, telephone number and address. "How a person feels about your company depends on their personal experience," according to the report. "Maybe they spoke with a very helpful customer service representative, and now they shop exclusively on your site. … Or perhaps they applied for a job at your company and never heard anything, leaving them with a negative impression. This is what a talent-hostile experience does—it turns top talent away because they can't find a job that suits them, they can't find content that helps them decide if the company is right for them, or the application process is too time-consuming and cumbersome." The findings are based on research involving more than 800 companies, examining the effectiveness of their career/jobs site; their communications with job candidates; and the overall candidate experience
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How much stress do we need to perform? 

How much stress do we need to perform?  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Threat versus reward state

If you feel negative emotions at work like frustration, anxiety, anger or impatience, you create a threat state – which makes you less focused. You have fewer insights, become more risk averse and feel less connected to others.

On the flip side, positive emotions create a reward state – leading to clearer thinking, more insights and a solution focus. And that means better performance.

So it all starts with how you perceive the problem you are facing. See it positively as an opportunity, and you will have greater capabilities on call. The pre-frontal cortex (PFC) experiences greater blood flow – this is where you make decisions about how to perceive things. In other words, our ability to make decisions is fundamentally shifted just by our perception of our ability to make a decision.

Determine your own stress response

Once you understand this, you can regulate your emotions so it’s easier to achieve (and maintain) a ‘reward state’. How do you respond to perceived threats? Do you know when you are not performing well? As this graph show
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