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4 Steps to Improving IT Value Realization

4 Steps to Improving IT Value Realization | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Improving IT value realization is clearly top of mind for many executives these days. Sadly, IT value realization is more of a focus among CEO's and CFO's tha
Don Dea's insight:
Step 1: Diagnose the Value Challenge
  1. Understand the value realization gaps and develop strategies targeting those issues
  2. Reconcile the time and energy devoted to value realization versus other less significant aspects of your program or project management processes and IT operations
    1. Management and stakeholder decision-making time devoted to value realization
    2. IT budget, IT investment and project approval decision-making processes
    3. Ensure value is central to all decision-making process and models
  3. Ensure your IT governance model focuses on value creation and accountability for value realization
  4. Ensure your organization’s definition of IT success speaks to the IT value contribution



Read more: http://blog.thehigheredcio.com/2013/03/18/it-value-realization/#ixzz303sUfCQJ

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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
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A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’

A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’ | digitalNow | Scoop.it
AI goes back to 1956 in the United States, where engineers decided they would write a computer program that would try to imitate intelligence. Within AI, a new field grew up called machine learning. Instead of writing a step-by-step program to do something — which is a traditional approach in AI — you collect lots of data about something that you’re trying to understand. For example, envision you’re trying to recognize objects, so you collect lots of images of them. Then, with machine learning, it’s an automated process that dissects out various features, and figures out that one thing is an automobile and the other is a stapler.

Machine learning is a very large field and goes way back. Originally, people were calling it “pattern recognition,” but the algorithms became much broader and much more sophisticated mathematically. Within machine learning are neural networks inspired by the brain, and then deep learning. Deep learning algorithms have a particular architecture with many layers that flow through the network. So basically, deep learning is one part of machine learning and machine learning is one part of AI.
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Commentary: How Megadonors Could Save America’s Universities

Commentary: How Megadonors Could Save America’s Universities | digitalNow | Scoop.it
These current donors are different from past philanthropists in important ways.

First, these donors tend to be business builders, with most of them representing first-generation entrepreneurial wealth. Schwarzman is joined by other such builders who have given $100 million or more to higher education, including Michael Bloomberg, Phil Knight, Bill Gates, John Paulson, Michael Dell, and Ken Langone. All of these men are examples of those who achieved the American dream and wanted to give back.

Second, these donors tend to give while they live rather than defer to late life or posthumous gifts. By contrast, many past industrialists such as Andrew Carnegie, Henry Ford, and John D. Rockefeller made their gifts in their final years or through their heirs—too late to help guide the paths of their beneficiaries. Furthermore, these barons were motivated to cleanse earlier career controversies.
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How To Spot Leadership Character With 10 Easy Signs 

Listen for these 10 indicators of strong character. Chances are, if you’re seeing these patterns in their conversation you may well be dealing with the kind of person you want on your team.

They receive a compliment with grace.
They receive negative feedback with humility and non-defensiveness.
They give voice to disagreement while still extending respect.
They give thoughtful answers, not off-the-cuff reactions.
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The Collapse of Stategy

The very word “strategy,” according to Michael Porter, is overused. Sometimes, organizations conflate “strategy” with mission or operational effectiveness. Sometimes, organizations distort “strategy,” making it lopsided, an exclusive view of demand and customer needs. Or sometimes, after adopting an amalgam of competitor initiatives, organizations develop a “strategy” that has the same feel as a jarring cubist painting.

Perhaps the most alarming part is that most organizations believe they have a strategy when in fact they have none. In the book Understanding Michael Porter, The Essential Guide to Competition and Strategy, in an excerpt from an interview with Harvard Business Review’s Joan Magretta, Michael Porter says: “I'd have to say that the worst mistake—and the most common one—is not having a strategy at all. Most executives think they have a strategy when they really don't, at least not a strategy that meets any kind of rigorous, economically grounded definition.” 
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CEOs, Are You Confident in Your Marketing Team’s Ability to Drive Growth?

Increase External Focus – React Faster to Market Changes with Outside-In Thinking
Marketing must be the eyes and ears of the company – but most marketers don’t get out of the office on a regular basis. Every member of the team should observe your market from your customer’s vantage point. By engaging in this exercise, marketers are better prepared to bring the voice of the customer to the table when making decisions. Every key marketing decision and plan must be calibrated around the impact on the customer and focus on adding real value for them.
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BBC - Capital - An easy way to read more each year

BBC - Capital - An easy way to read more each year | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Over the past few decades, commuting times have risen dramatically in most major cities. As inner-city property prices have mounted, many workers are moving further to city peripheries for lower costs – but those searching for cheaper rents are encountering longer commutes. The number of Brits spending two hours a day commuting, for example, had increased by 72% in a decade, according to a 2015 study.

Indeed, the most recent studies available find the typical Londoner spends an average of six hours and 10 minutes each week commuting, while the average New Yorker clocks in slightly more, at six hours and 18 minutes.

Meanwhile, millennials are reading more than their older counterparts. According to a Pew study, 72% of 18- to 29-year-old readers in the US have read a print book in the previous year, more than any other age group. At the same time, a third of book buyers under 44 want to spend less time on digital devices, says the Codex Group, which specialises in book audience research. Print book sales have risen in each of the three last years, following a period of stagnation.

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- The man who swims to work
- The gruelling, six-hour commute of Beijing’s workers
- The man who takes a plane to work every day

Publishers are well aware of both these trends, and are actively chasing the 'commuter read'. Penguin has started publishing small-sized books “designed to pick up, pocket, and go”, says Philippa Cowburn, a spokeswoman. In a similar vein, Oxford University Press has released a selection of 35,000-word titles, formatted in specialised block paragraphs which aim to make it easier to find your place again after forced breaks in concentration.

If we consider that the average adult reads about 300 words a minute, in the six hours you might commute each week, you could read some 108,000 words, and still have enough time left to check in and update your Twitter. That’s about the length of Wuthering Heights, Gulliver's Travels or Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Of course, that’s assuming you’re riding on public transport and have the elbow room to open a book. Those behind the wheel have no such option – unless they’re listening to audiobooks, that is.
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How Do You Get People to Tell the Truth?

How Do You Get People to Tell the Truth? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
It is incumbent on the question-askers to decide, what is the more important information here? Is it more important for me to find out a problem with the car, or to find out that the car is OK? I know that feels a little bit wibbly-wobbly as a distinction, but recognizing when problems are really important to find out should help guide us to ask questions that focus on those problems.

If there are other problems that don’t matter too much, if you really don’t care too much about the air conditioning in the car or whether the person flosses every day, maybe you can be a little looser with those questions. But when there’s a problem that is really important to discover, then you should be especially careful in how those questions are phrased.

Schweitzer: We know that, for example, drug compliance is very low, even for people who have had heart attacks, even for people who have had heart disease, even for people who have had transplants. The way a clinician asks the question can really guide people to answer very, very differently, and these could have serious health implications.
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Avoiding the Pitfalls of Impromptu Speaking

Avoiding the Pitfalls of Impromptu Speaking | digitalNow | Scoop.it

A senior vice president I know had just joined a firm and was asked to speak at the next town hall. He was excited about the opportunity to address the company’s 3,000 employees and carefully prepared a scripted speech. But when he began to rehearse, the CEO took one look at the script, and asked,

“What’s that?”

“It’s my speech,” the new executive replied.

“Oh, we don’t give speeches here,” the CEO said. “Just talk to our employees.”

Fortunately, he had time to mentally master the thoughts he had written out, and he spoke without a text – to rave reviews.

Such spontaneous dialogue is the new normal for business leaders. No longer hidden behind podiums as their predecessors were, today’s leaders are far more likely to engage their audience in dialogue. These conversations might be interviews, town halls, elevator conversations, corridor exchanges, or brief remarks sparked by “Do you have a minute?”

As casual as these extemporaneous situations seem to be, they can be high stakes situations for leaders.

If you want to speak as a leader in impromptu situations, avoid the following pitfalls:

Pitfall #1: Not Preparing

Many leaders think of impromptu speaking as “winging it,” but doing so will lead to many stumbles – and who wants to be known for that track record?

Winston Churchill had fun with speakers who talk without thinking. He observed: “Before they get up, they do not know what they are going to say; when they are speaking, they do not know what they are saying; and when they have sat down, they do not know what they have said.”

As counterintuitive as it may seem, you can prepare to be spontaneous. There are times when you know you’ll be part of an impromptu event – a client chat, a conversation with a team member, a networking event, or a Q&A. Take whatever time you have to prepare notes, or a mental outline of what you will say. Even if you only have a few seconds, pause and decide what your message is.

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Concocting A 'Simple And Digital' Formula For Customers

Concocting A 'Simple And Digital' Formula For Customers | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Frustrated executives wonder, “To transform my business through digital, how do I get started, and how do I orchestrate things?”

Responding to the loudest voices within the organization is not the way. Instead, established companies that are reaping the greatest benefits from digital begin with the customer—his or her needs, priorities, points of pain and points of delight. Customers may not always know they want an innovation (few customers were clamoring for the first cars or computers), but they do know what they value.
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Augmented Reality: Spreading Human Expertise Via Machine

Augmented Reality: Spreading Human Expertise Via Machine | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Put the customer “episode” front and center

From the customer’s perspective, the value of an experience goes well beyond the functional benefits of a given product. Customers often find value in the emotional elements of an offering, such as the ability to make connections or get organized. Human-centered design furthers these potent elements, and a growing number of firms have found the most authentic and practical design unit to be the customer episode. An episode consists of all the activities that the customer and the provider perform to fulfill the customer’s need. Episodes range from simple interactions (“I need to change my password”) to multistep, multiparty endeavors (“I need to move broadband to my new place”).

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The Friendship of Wolves

As a result, leaders can find themselves engaged with a large number of people over the course of a given day and yet feel profoundly alone. This can leave leaders vulnerable to the friendship of wolves--insincere expressions of care and interest from people whose agendas may not be aligned with the leader's best interests. And this danger is compounded in tightly-networked industries where people socialize frequently with colleagues and confidential information is highly valuable and travels quickly. (Sound familiar?)

And yet we're intensely social creatures who struggle--and even suffer--when we lack the requisite amount of interaction with people who we trust. So if you're a senior leader, what can you do?

Get out of the role: Cultivate relationships in groups and settings where people have a common interest outside of work, where job titles are irrelevant, and where status derives from sources other than professional accomplishment. Be known for your skills (or lack thereof) as a rock climber, ballroom dancer, horseback rider, weightlifter--anything other than leader.
Treat family like family: A leader's need to discuss work can easily extend beyond family members' capacity to listen. (This is one reason why coaches like me have a job.) I'm not suggesting that work shouldn't be discussed at home, but insure that family members feel empowered to set limits on those conversations in order to make room for other topics and other ways of interacting.
Treat friends like treasures: Some of the most important people in a leader's life are those few individuals who are A) successful enough to avoid feeling threatened by or jealous of the leader's status, B) sophisticated enough to understand and empathize with the leader's challenges, C) invested in the leader as an individual and NOT invested in the leader's company, and D) completely trustworthy. Over the course of your lifetime you may meet just a handful of people who fit all of these criteria--when you do, recognize how rare and valuable they are.
Beware the wolves: Leaders attract people with a wide range of motives, and while the cost of cynicism is isolation, there's also a cost to naivete. It's important to test for trust and to admit people into closer confidence over a series of repeated interactions. You may have to work with wolves at one time or another, but successful co-existence requires you to see them for who they are, with no illusions about their professed friendship.
Start now: A theme in my practice is the price leaders pay when they wait too long, and it's particularly steep when it comes to the activities discussed here. You can't magically create true friends in a time of need if you haven't been investing in those relationships--only wolves will heed that call.
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Time for a new approach to motivating millennials

What are generational values?
You might have first encountered the idea of values differences as I did, through Morris Massey’s fabulously popular lecture "What You Are Is Where You Were When." Massey was a professor at the University of Colorado and a wonderful mentor for me in the early 1970s. His lecture (and subsequent video) changed the way I thought about values (and the course of my education and career).

In 1991, researchers William Strauss and Neil Howe published their fascinating study in "Generations: The History of America’s Future from 1584 to 2069." They tracked US values through generations using documents, media reports and historical records. They described how each 20 years or so ushers a new set of values -- a generational values personality.

They created the terms we are now so familiar with, from baby boomers to millennials. They also found that types of values repeat themselves in predictable patterns. A generation lasts approximately 20 years, and types of values begin repeating after the fourth generation, or every 80 years. So, millennials born between 1981-2002, roughly speaking, have similar types of values as people born between 1901 and 1924. The two generations have similar peer-value profiles.

The research on generational values is still young and, admittedly, interesting. Seeing values echoed sequentially in a fixed pattern over the ages might demonstrate how we can learn from history, provide insight into the future by studying how values repeat in cycles and help us better understand ourselves and others.

However, generational values only describe the formation of a huge population’s programmed values -- values that are unexplored and generated by what a particular age group experienced growing up. Parents, take note: The greatest influence on your children’s programmed values are their peers and what’s happening in their world.
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How teaching instead of terminating pays off in business

How teaching instead of terminating pays off in business | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Understanding why talent may (temporarily) be lacking
Managers who don’t immediately hit the eject button may discover that what seems like an individual challenge is actually an organizational concern. The only way to figure out what’s really happening is to be willing to coach people who struggle to fulfill their requirements.

Truly, mentoring can be the key to solving many on-the-job conundrums. Michael D. Mumford, author of "Pathways to Outstanding Leadership: A Comparative Analysis of Charismatic, Ideological, and Pragmatic Leaders," says that hands-on, collaborative leadership support lowers employees’ resistance to be creative. He refers to this type of management as “respecting the ideas and the competence of the person as a creator,” which is in direct contrast to hire-fast, fire-faster philosophies.

Another benefit to switching to a coaching style when managing underperformers is that collective engagement begins to tick upward. A study released by Deloitte in 2016 explained that the key to engagement is an “enabling infrastructure.” Individuals who aren’t privately or publicly chastised for one-time errors feel more apt to come forward when they need different timelines or see an opportunity to make tangible changes to positively affect deliverables.

Opening the path to talk instead of terination
Is one or more of your team members continuously delivering unacceptable, uninspiring work? Implement these tactics to find out if the problem lies at the company’s — and not the worker's — feet.

1. Hold one-on-one meetings

These shouldn’t be scary, “you’re in big trouble, buster” conversations. Make your time with employees a prime opportunity for them to describe their obstacles. Listen fully. Then, explore ways to partner on closing gaps in processes to help them do better work. They’re the ones doing the jobs; you’re not helping if all you do is dictate.

2. Invest in necessary resources
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A New Model for Integrating Behavioral Science and Design

A New Model for Integrating Behavioral Science and Design | digitalNow | Scoop.it
A new book, co-authored by Tuff, bolsters the case for stretching beyond “core” behavioral interventions. His updated model parallels the structure of our proposed bottom-left and top-right triangles, labeling them “known/knowable opportunities” and “unknown/unknowable opportunities,” respectively. The former is the terrain of identified challenges, which can be addressed with known insights and tools. This is largely where behavioral science has played so far. The latter, by contrast, requires new approaches to identify those challenges, let alone solve for them and gauge the success of solutions—exactly the conditions that play to the strengths of design.
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The Romero Team's comment, November 12, 9:31 PM
nice article!
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It's Okay to Say No at Work

It's Okay to Say No at Work | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The “Yes” Compulsion
As an A-player, Sarah is probably going to say yes to all these tasks, even though she doesn’t have the time and energy to give each one its due. Saying no to any of them would mean disappointing someone and tarnishing her image as someone who makes things happen, wouldn’t it?

A lot of us, like Sarah, get a rush from saying yes at work. We want to seem helpful, willing to create value wherever we can and for whomever we can—and we want to be top of mind when the next promotion comes around.  But if your A-players (or B-players) get in the habit of spreading themselves thin with yeses, their effectiveness is going to plummet.
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The Romero Team's comment, November 7, 11:45 PM
i agree
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9 Elements of Digital Transformation that Guide Digitization

9 Elements of Digital Transformation that Guide Digitization | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Digitally Modified Businesses:
Traditional business is rapidly moving towards digital models, for instance, brick and mortar retail is shifting its focus towards eCommerce. This helps them secure new customers, retain clients and improve cross-selling. Omni-channel sales also allow the establishment of an authoritative position in the market.

While for retail the process of using digital media for new business is obvious, other businesses like food and beverages, fashion and even industrial goods manufacturers are incorporating digital mediums into their current business process. This lets them inform customers about their products and services and efficiently sell them once they enter stores or when sales reps approach them.

New Digital Businesses:
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Study Shows Executive Teams Barely Communicating

The research reveals that most nonprofits falter when it comes to executive team effectiveness, characterized by productive group interactions, clarity of the team’s role, and capable CEO leadership, said Henry Barmeir, Bridgespan manager and co-author of the report.

From the research, Bridgespan created a sequence of five steps, formulated as questions, that executive teams can implement as a guide to increase their overall effectiveness:

Is the CEO effectively managing the executive team?
Is the executive team focused on the most important work?
Does executive team composition support its ability to do the work
Do meeting and communication processes support superior decision and execution?
Does the team’s dynamic foster the right conversations and results?
“Executive teams play a critical role in shaping organization-wide decisions and share responsibility for the organization’s results,” Bridgespan partner and co-author Libbie Landles-Cobb said. “Yet we’ve seen surprisingly little research into how effective nonprofit executive teams are today, and what can be done to increase effectiveness. Our study attempts to address this gap,” she said.

For the three-quarters of respondents that did not rate their executive team as highly effective: “Imagine the productivity boost for your organization, and you personally, if the team advanced from good to great,” Kirk Kramer, head of Bridgespan’s leadership practice and co-author of the paper, said via a press release announcing the survey results.
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If You Quit You Die – Points and Figures

Many of our friends are moving to places like Florida.  I empathize because the year round weather is better and the tax bite is significantly less. But, I have always joked that Florida is “God’s Waiting Room”.  There are a lot of older people down there. To me it lacks the vibrancy of other places.  Except, in January it sure looks good.

I know other buddies of mine that made a lot of money trading and quit.  They tried to play golf or tennis every day.  It drove them nuts.  They didn’t have a purpose.  I don’t think a hobby can replace a job.

I had a friend who was related to a CEO/Founder of a Fortune 100 company.  The CEO had retired.  We went with our kids to his home to go swimming.  He had an indoor pool.  It was the afternoon and he was in his pajamas having a cocktail.  I was a bit taken aback.
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Great Leadership: You Don’t Have to Be Gates (or Buffett) to Shake the World

Information and opinions about leadership and management development by expert Dan McCarthy

 

Here are some details about each of these three tenets in the GTY process. Add your own items to the lists!  

1. Expand Yourself.

Take a personal inventory of:

· Things I do well

· Meaningful experiences I have had

· Life lessons I have learned

· People I know

· My admirable qualities

· My personal values

Then ask, what more can I do to improve the quality and depth of my experience and knowledge?

2. Give Yourself

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5 Ways To Thrive When The World Is Always Changing

5 Ways To Thrive When The World Is Always Changing | digitalNow | Scoop.it
5 principles of change
Understand the foundational knowledge of your organization – It’s well known that incumbents fail to see new rivals on the horizon.  To better adapt, organizations must reassess the foundational, or core, knowledge that is central to their business, and appreciate it’s maturity.  In other words, you must begin by knowing where you are.
Acquire and cultivate new knowledge disciplines – I’ve written many times about the recombinative nature of innovation, where knowledge of disparate disciplines pays dividends.  Innovation, and competitive advantage, derives from the assimilation of new knowledge and the timely creation of new markets.
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The Cognitive Dissonance of the CEO

The Cognitive Dissonance of the CEO | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The relevance to a CEO who's seeking not only to take action themselves, but also to influence the actions of prospective investors, employees, and customers, is obvious. And this is why it's so difficult to fully inhabit the two mindsets described above for any sustained period of time. In these circumstances most people would feel compelled to take steps to reduce the dissonance in order to move in one direction or another. They might remain committed to the entrepreneurial vision, but to do so they would discount the risks involved--and then they would likely be caught by surprise when problems arise--as they inevitably do in any new venture. Or their awareness of the risks would overwhelm their faith in the vision, and they'd opt for a safer, more secure path--which is one reason why relatively few people become entrepreneurs in the first place.
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 Savvy, Prosperous and Young

 Savvy, Prosperous and Young | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Define a consistent taxonomy of episodes

The first task is to break down the customer’s high-level needs into the most meaningful episodes. A company defines an episode by what the customer wants to do, with a clear start and end, and each episode consists of a number of underlying operational processes. For instance, a bank would unpack the customer’s overall need to “pay for things” into “pay another person,” “set up online bill payment” or “make an international transfer.” Creating a clear taxonomy of episodes, including how they fit together, is essential for focusing team efforts.
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Are you undermining your leadership credibility?

Are you undermining your leadership credibility? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
1. “You can tell me anything!”

This statement is made to solicit input or feedback on a particular idea or course of action. However, sometimes leaders will completely discount the idea or opinion offered, especially if it’s something they don’t immediately agree with.  They don’t take the time to honestly consider the proffered information or to understand the reasoning behind it.  I have even observed leaders going so far as to label the idea as “stupid” or completely unacceptable.  Shutting down the conversation so abruptly and negatively will not promote continued sharing of ideas.  Rather, people will be so intimidated they will say little to nothing, or just tell you what they think you want to hear—correct or not.  People will learn that there is a price to be paid for speaking up and may decide it’s just not worth it.

2. Don’t coerce support.

Sometimes in an attempt to win approval for an idea or decision, leaders will say something like, “I need you to support my position today in the meeting. You have to back me up!” Often there’s an implied, “Or else.” Such behavior destroys candor, honesty and team morale. Negative interactions such as these will permeate your environment, and people will end up doing what they are told rather than honestly participating, speaking up and offering ideas.
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Praise your employees: 5 ways to reward and recognize

Praise your employees: 5 ways to reward and recognize | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Studies show that people are far more motivated by positive reinforcement than by the fear of failure, yet many workplace cultures are still buzzing with the daily energy of “just not screwing up.”

If you work in one of these offices, where employees are frequently distracted from the goals of the organization by anxiety about being called out for mistakes, what can you do? The good news is that no matter what level of leadership you currently hold, you can help to create a more positive workplace culture just by adding two words to your routine: Thank you. It seems simple, but praise and recognition are often overlooked by busy professionals focused on the bottom line.

If you want to draw people to you with positivity and motivate your team to strive for greatness, read below about the art of offering up positive recognition in the workplace.

Offer praise one on one
Research shows that employees today, especially millennials, crave one-on-one attention from their managers and superiors, and most feel they don’t get enough. Make sure that the interactions with your team aren’t strictly about corrective feedback -- make time for praise and recognition in a solo setting, too. Give people time to recap and review the success with you, highlighting what went well, and what they learned or would do differently next time. Give them a few minutes to talk about their wins, and congratulate accordingly.

Give praise publicly
Recapping in a one-on-one setting will set you up well when you speak publicly about your team’s accomplishments. Now you have all the details to sell their successes to your superiors, other teams and the organization as a whole. Give praise and recognition to others in multiple forums, making sure that others are seen as trailblazers, innovators and problem-solvers.

Publicly celebrate the achievements and invite the organization to mark their accomplishments. You have to advocate for yourself, too, at the right time, but don’t worry too much about highlighting your own role in most of these public situations. Noting the success of your team will show more positive leadership than taking the credit for yourself. Both those higher up and those high-performers you’d like to attract to your team will remember how you praised others.

Say "thank you"
On my local station, the news anchors, meteorologists and reporters thank each other when handing off from segment to segment. This is a lovely and simple expression of gratitude, and it goes a long way in enforcing a positive culture; don’t become a stereotypical boss who fails to use these critical words merely because the work is “someone’s job.”

The men and women we work with deserve appreciation for a job well done, and “thank you” should be delivered with intention, eye contact and sincerity on a regular basis.
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How structured is your approach to problem-solving?

How structured is your approach to problem-solving? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
How structured is your approach to problem-solving?

Very – we have clearly defined steps and output at each step: 19.5%
Kind of – we generally follow a repeatable problem solving process: 50.5%
Not very – our problem solving is a bit haphazard: 21.5%
Not at all – we never solve problems the same way twice: 8.5%
A weak structure means weak solutions. Problem-solving is a repeatable process with predictable end products for most common problems. A structured approach to problem-solving ensures you fully understand the problem and are comprehensive in your search for solutions. The structured approach is also efficient. If you can be hypothesis-based in your problem solving and focus on the highest opportunity solutions, you can save a lot of time by not chasing small ideas.
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