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IT Scorecard Shows Green While Customers Are Seeing Red

IT Scorecard Shows Green While Customers Are Seeing Red | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Does your IT scorecard show nothing but green while your customers are seeing red? Take a minute before you answer. Is it possible your IT scorecard is committ
Don Dea's insight:
Right Metric Wrong Measurement

Right metric wrong measurement can also be thought of as “right KPI wrong metric” and many other variants. This happens when the IT scorecard presents a performance indicator but is using the wrong method of measuring for it or the wrong source for the data.

There are numerous ways in which this can happen. Oftentimes the right metric wrong measurement is simply a decision to use a number that is generated by a system that may not actually be a measure of what it says it is. Sometimes it is simply IT managers not really understanding the metric and how one variation is different from another.



Read more: http://blog.thehigheredcio.com/2013/03/08/it-scorecard-shows-green-while-customers-are-seeing-red/#ixzz2ZYZSisUR

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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
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What To Do When You Discover That Passion Alone Isn’t Enough 

What To Do When You Discover That Passion Alone Isn’t Enough  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Here are 10 realities leaders know about the one-two punch of passion and discipline:

Passion sees the vision. Discipline translates it into action.
Passion attracts a team. Discipline builds the team
Passion makes good decisions. Discipline implements the decisions.
Passion establishes values. Discipline lives the values out.
Passion envisions a healthy culture. Discipline makes it happen.
Passion describes the goal. Discipline forms the strategy to reach the goal.
Passion creates priorities. Discipline executes the priorities.
Passion generates ideas. Discipline turns them into reality.
Passion challenges people to grow. Discipline helps them do it.
Passion drives innovation. Discipline drives implementation.
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The root cause of workplace drama: Lack of clarity

The root cause of workplace drama: Lack of clarity | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Your managers aren’t making good decisions. They continue to go to their vice presidents and executives to get approval. You believe this time-wasting workplace issue is due to a lack of confidence. You offer leadership training that includes a workshop on decision-making, but the problem persists.

There is a reason people do what they do, and that reason is often due to the culture and past experiences. For example, on a consulting project, I found out that the reason managers didn’t make decisions is because they lacked confidence. The reason the managers lacked confidence was because many of their decisions had been overridden by senior leaders. Therefore, the managers feared making mistakes and losing face in front of employees.

What to do: Look through old records and find examples of decisions made by managers that were overridden by a higher authority. If you see more than a couple of examples, you may need to develop a decision-making process or get some outside consulting support to get everyone on the same page. 
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Be honest about what you need from a new hire

Be honest about what you need from a new hire | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Now, this is confusing to a lot of people. We hear about companies like Facebook and Google in every business article ever written. All of us seem to have fast phones and cool new tech/apps come out every day. So why is everything seemingly so fast and innovative, but companies are becoming more bullshit-laden every day? Here’s one good hot take via Greg Satell:

To many, this is surprising because we seem to see innovation all around us, from smarter smartphones to speakers that talk to us and respond to our commands. However, the truth is that information and communication technology makes up only 6% of advanced economies. Silicon Valley can’t build the future alone.

True.

So, companies are increasingly bureaucratic…
… and look, even though we should be changing that and making them more innovative and having self-contained entrepreneurial hubs, we need to look at the reality. Well, two realities.

A lot of managers just want box-checkers. They want to get projects off their plate and have them handled without any fires or brushback. They don’t want “innovation hubs.” The game is slicing down your to-do list and getting home at a semi-reasonable time.
Bureaucracy rises up because it makes it easier to make money without having to actually make decisions. That’s comforting to millions of people.
How does this all tie to hiring?
We tend to open a lot of white-collar hiring processes and say we’re looking for …

“Innovative”
“Entrepreneurial”
“A-Player”
“Hit the ground running”
“Collaborator”
“Out of the box thinker”
… but look at everything above. We’re not headed in that direction. We’re actually headed the other way.

And look, some roles are fucking drone jobs. It’s unfortunate, and it shouldn’t be — this is why automation concerns so many people — but some jobs are just mindless spreadsheet-updating and PowerPoint-creation, and then the people with real authority barely glance at those assets.

If you think I’m just ranting, cool. The New Yorker, who is more respected than I am, just covered this too.
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Undone by a culture of toxicity

Undone by a culture of toxicity | digitalNow | Scoop.it
One of the top charitable foundations in the US is dealing with the exposure of regular bullying, harassment and emotional abuse by a top executive, as well as what is overall a toxic culture.

There were red flags about the toxic nature of the foundation’s culture everywhere you looked. Formal complaints about this woman’s behavior were made to HR but, according to numerous former and current employees, the executive director did nothing. At least one lawsuit was filed against this woman. It was settled out of court.

Turnover at all levels was significant. The foundation notes that 73 people -- out of 140 total employees -- have left since January 2016.

On Glassdoor, the foundation earns only a 1.9 score on a five-point scale. Only 14% of employees recommend the company, and only 26% approve of the CEO.

How did these executives miss these flags? The complaints were frequent and noted consistent bad behavior. The organization’s values are honorable, yet it is obvious that this woman didn’t demonstrate the company’s values daily. “Integrity,” “inclusiveness,” and “respect” were not words employees used to describe the way she treated others.

The executive director valued growth, and he got it, yet at significant human cost.

Watch this three-minute video for my three steps to ensuring you never have a toxic culture
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What To Do When You Discover That Passion Alone Isn’t Enough

What To Do When You Discover That Passion Alone Isn’t Enough | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Here are 10 realities leaders know about the one-two punch of passion and discipline:

Passion sees the vision. Discipline translates it into action.
Passion attracts a team. Discipline builds the team
Passion makes good decisions. Discipline implements the decisions.
Passion establishes values. Discipline lives the values out.
Passion envisions a healthy culture. Discipline makes it happen.
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Five Ways Companies Can Be More Nimble

Five Ways Companies Can Be More Nimble | digitalNow | Scoop.it
In order to manage and surmount uncertainties, companies need to strategically use five kinds of agility, writes Vivekin CEO Baba Prasad in his book, 'Nimble.'
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 Intelligent Workplace Communications

 Intelligent Workplace Communications | digitalNow | Scoop.it
machines get smarter, and smarter by the second.    

Connect, Inspire and Drive Action
So back to leadership and communication. Wouldn’t it be great if instead of asking an intelligent digital assistant, you could ask anyone in your organization a simple question like “so what are we trying to achieve and why?” Wouldn’t it be great if that person could then respond quickly, confidently, and accurately as a result of your great leadership communication? In my experience, just getting a response other than a panicked facial expression would be progress. When you step back and look at the combined horsepower, experience, and talent you have in your organization, not communicating effectively such that every person feels connected, inspired and able to answer the question your message affords is a huge problem that leadership communication can address, if done right. 

Here are three tips to help:
1. Start with the end in mind. 

Focus on the question you want your audience to answer accurately. We know that the accuracy of the answer from a digital assistant depends very much on how you ask the question. The more ambiguous your question, the more complex your ask, and the more you ignore all that surrounding ambient noise diluting crispness, and the less predictable response you get. Too often leadership communication can come across as a stream of consciousness from a leader who feels the need (or is told) to communicate far too much all at once. The real intent of the communication is lost in detail and complexity, and the leader fails to connect, inspire or engage anyone. I know this sounds sort of obvious and is one of those common-sense kinds of reminders, but as a leader, simply before you communicate, start with the end in mind. Ask yourself, what is the question your communication needs to address quickly, confidently, and accurately? When that question is something you would feel confident asking a digital assistant – clear, simple and appreciative of the surrounding environment, you stand a great chance of connecting, inspiring and driving your audience to action. 
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Time for a new approach to motivating millennials

The Values Point of View model reinforces three key notions:

Programmed values aren’t nearly as powerful as developed values. A developed value is thoughtfully chosen from alternatives, with an understanding of the consequences of the alternatives, and acted on over time, prized and publicly owned.
Values are individually held and issue-based. A value is a choice you make regarding a specific issue. You can hold one type of value when it comes to women’s rights and another when it comes to gun control. The problem is that many people fail to explore their values and underlying beliefs, depending instead on unexplored programmed values that are general and generational.
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Time for a new approach to motivating millennials

Time for a new approach to motivating millennials | digitalNow | Scoop.it
What are generational values?
You might have first encountered the idea of values differences as I did, through Morris Massey’s fabulously popular lecture "What You Are Is Where You Were When." Massey was a professor at the University of Colorado and a wonderful mentor for me in the early 1970s. His lecture (and subsequent video) changed the way I thought about values (and the course of my education and career).

In 1991, researchers William Strauss and Neil Howe published their fascinating study in "Generations: The History of America’s Future from 1584 to 2069." They tracked US values through generations using documents, media reports and historical records. They described how each 20 years or so ushers a new set of values -- a generational values personality.

They created the terms we are now so familiar with, from baby boomers to millennials. They also found that types of values repeat themselves in predictable patterns. A generation lasts approximately 20 years, and types of values begin repeating after the fourth generation, or every 80 years. So, millennials born between 1981-2002, roughly speaking, have similar types of values as people born between 1901 and 1924. The two generations have similar peer-value profiles.

The research on generational values is still young and, admittedly, interesting. Seeing values echoed sequentially in a fixed pattern over the ages might demonstrate how we can learn from history, provide insight into the future by studying how values repeat in cycles and help us better understand ourselves and others.

However, generational values only describe the formation of a huge population’s programmed values -- values that are unexplored and generated by what a particular age group experienced growing up. Parents, take note: The greatest influence on your children’s programmed values are their peers and what’s happening in their world.
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How structured is your approach to problem-solving?

How structured is your approach to problem-solving? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
How structured is your approach to problem-solving?

Very – we have clearly defined steps and output at each step: 19.5%
Kind of – we generally follow a repeatable problem solving process: 50.5%
Not very – our problem solving is a bit haphazard: 21.5%
Not at all – we never solve problems the same way twice: 8.5%
A weak structure means weak solutions. Problem-solving is a repeatable process with predictable end products for most common problems. A structured approach to problem-solving ensures you fully understand the problem and are comprehensive in your search for solutions. The structured approach is also efficient. If you can be hypothesis-based in your problem solving and focus on the highest opportunity solutions, you can save a lot of time by not chasing small ideas. For the 30% of you not solving problems with a structured approach, give structure a try. You might find you’ll come up with bigger and better solutions faster than ever before.
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Is the "silent killer" sabotaging your performance?

Is the "silent killer" sabotaging your performance? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Human connection is boosted in cultures in which leaders communicate an inspiring vision, value people and give them a voice. An easy way to think of these elements is through this formula: Vision + Value + Voice = Connection.

Communicate an inspiring vision. If you are a leader or manager in your organization, communicate an inspiring vision by reminding people of how the work they do is helping others. Chuck Schwab inspired people who worked at the company he founded, Charles Schwab, by establishing a mission to provide the most useful and ethical financial services in the world.

Costco inspires its people with the motto “do the right thing,” which is defined as obey the law, take care of members, take care of employees, respect suppliers and reward shareholders, in that order. Costco has a reputation for doing the right thing and its employees rightly feel proud, knowing that they are part of an ethical organization.
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Is the "silent killer" sabotaging your performance?

Is the "silent killer" sabotaging your performance? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
To reduce loneliness and isolation, boost connection
To protect yourself and your organization, be intentional about developing and maintaining a “Connection Culture.” In my book "Connection Culture: The Competitive Advantage of Shared Identity, Empathy and Understanding at Work," I make the case for connection and describe how leaders including Alan Mulally, the CEO who saved Ford Motor from bankruptcy; Bono of the rock band U2; Frances Hesselbein, former head of the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.; Ratan Tata, former head of the Tata Group; and Victor Boschini, chancellor of Texas Christian University led in ways that boosted human connection in their organization’s culture.

In an earlier SmartBrief article, I wrote about Costco’s Connection Culture and how it helped the organization surpass Google to be recognized as America’s best large company employer (according to research by Forbes and Statista).

Human connection is boosted in cultures in which leaders communicate an inspiring vision, value people and give them a voice. An easy way to think of these elements is through this formula: Vision + Value + Voice = Connection.

Communicate an inspiring vision. If you are a leader or manager in your organization, communicate an inspiring vision by reminding people of how the work they do is helping others. Chuck Schwab inspired people who worked at the company he founded, Charles Schwab, by establishing a mission to provide the most useful and ethical financial services in the world.
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The right framing and questions lead to productive conversations

The right framing and questions lead to productive conversations | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Imagine trying to lead an organization or team without words or conversation. Impossible, right? Everything leaders do is mediated through conversation. So, what are you doing with your conversations?

What if you had the keys to ensure your conversations would fuel productivity and engagement? Keys that would inspire creativity, motivate collaborative action, and generate innovative possibilities for resolving complex challenges? Think of how and where you might be able to take your team or organization empowered with those keys!

There are only two keys. They will help you do all of the above, and we're going to give them to you right now: Positive framing and generative questions.

The first key is to frame your conversations to talk about what you want, to focus on desired outcomes instead of on problems and deficits. Then, use the second key: powerful generative questions. Ask questions that indicate you don’t have the answer. Questions that invite diverse perspectives, new information and disruptive ideas related to the outcomes you’re after. The conversations that will evolve will allow you to collaboratively discover ways to move towards those outcomes.

Here’s an example. A leading Fortune 500 company had a serious issue with sexual harassment. Leaders, anxious to do something about it, began a root-cause analysis and conducted surveys to clarify the extent of the problem and solicit solutions. The more they looked into it, the worse the problem became. It seemed sexual harassment was rampant and tension in the organization grew even as they attempted to find solutions.

A curious consultant asked, “What do you want?” Leaders replied, “An end to sexual harassment.” The consultant pushed forward. "OK. If there is no sexual harassment, what will there be?”

After consideration, one replied, “Well, of course, we want high-quality, cross-gender relationships in the workplace.” 
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How willing is your organization to invest in growth?

How willing is your organization to invest in growth? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
How willing is your organization to invest in growth?

Very. We spend freely to drive the top line: 12%
Somewhat. We spend on focused areas only: 60%
Not very. Our investments are few and far between: 18%
Not at all. We never spend on driving growth: 10%
It takes money to make money. Almost 30% of you report not spending much at all in your growth efforts. I'd venture to guess your companies aren't growing. While it can be hard to carve out the funds to invest, you have to realize you can't cut costs to achieve profitability forever. At some point, there's nothing left to cut. To overcome this dynamic, be deliberate about setting aside funds in your budget for growth spending. With budgeting season around the corner for many of you, think about where your best growth opportunities are and make sure they're fully funded. Then, don't make the mistake of raiding those funds to make up for shortfalls elsewhere. Growth won't happen magically. You need to invest it to catch up with the 70% of organizations out there who are freer with the purse strings.
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5 leadership strategies that cultivate cognitive diversity

5 leadership strategies that cultivate cognitive diversity | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Check in with yourself
Watch for and combat your own personal biases relative to how people think, process information and solve problems. Treat this just like any other diversity factor. Take the time to recognize and process your own reactions; but don’t allow them to affect how you interact with others.

Convene teams that think differently
Consciously create cognitively diverse teams. Recruit people intentionally to ensure a rich mix of thinking styles and different points of view. Intentionally seek out others who approach problems differently than you do.
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The right framing and questions lead to productive conversations

The right framing and questions lead to productive conversations | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Imagine trying to lead an organization or team without words or conversation. Impossible, right? Everything leaders do is mediated through conversation. So, what are you doing with your conversations?

What if you had the keys to ensure your conversations would fuel productivity and engagement? Keys that would inspire creativity, motivate collaborative action, and generate innovative possibilities for resolving complex challenges? Think of how and where you might be able to take your team or organization empowered with those keys!

There are only two keys. They will help you do all of the above, and we're going to give them to you right now: Positive framing and generative questions.

The first key is to frame your conversations to talk about what you want, to focus on desired outcomes instead of on problems and deficits. Then, use the second key: powerful generative questions. Ask questions that indicate you don’t have the answer. Questions that invite diverse perspectives, new information and disruptive ideas related to the outcomes you’re after. The conversations that will evolve will allow you to collaboratively discover ways to move towards those outcomes.

Here’s an example. A leading Fortune 500 company had a serious issue with sexual harassment. Leaders, anxious to do something about it, began a root-cause analysis and conducted surveys to clarify the extent of the problem and solicit solutions. The more they looked into it, the worse the problem became. It seemed sexual harassment was rampant and tension in the organization grew even as they attempted to find solutions.

A curious consultant asked, “What do you want?” Leaders replied, “An end to sexual harassment.” The consultant pushed forward. "OK. If there is no sexual harassment, what will there be?”

After consideration, one replied, “Well, of course, we want high-quality, cross-gender relationships in the workplace.” 

After leadership began to ask questions about where those kinds of relationships were occurring, the solutions began magically to appear. Many people had examples of such relationships and from their stories they co-developed a strategy for teams and leadership to reinforce and ensure high quality, cross-gender relationships going forward.  Two years later, the organization won an award from the National Organization for Women as a Best Place to Work for Women.
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You're a chef, not a chemist

You're a chef, not a chemist | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The CEO knows the general direction his company is heading, but he’ll be the first to admit he doesn’t have a master plan all figured out. Should he pour it on to seize every opportunity the company is uncovering and risk overexpansion? Or slow things down to consolidate his gains and risk losing first-mover advantage? That’s just one of the many forks in the road he’s facing; as he comes across each one he has no choice but to choose.

Yet another client is a startup, pioneering a new industry that’s showing signs of being a genuine gold rush. Its management team knows, generally speaking, in what direction its nascent industry is heading, and they know they need to stake their claim in a relevant, differentiated and defensible niche. But (forgive the mixed metaphor) nobody can say what the final chessboard will look like. As arrogant as it would be for the team to assume they know how the industry will shake out, it would be foolish to not pursue a singular direction despite many uncertainties.
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What Happens When You Align Culture With Strategy

Traditional leadership doesn’t cut it anymore. Today, business success relies on exponential leadership and everything that embodies — such as openness, engagement, continuous learning, creative problem solving and a growth mindset. Significant achievements are possible when these values are present everywhere from leadership to work culture.

Legacies, reputations and greater responsibilities depend upon what lies beneath the numbers that workers crunch. A company rewards itself when exponential leaders align culture with strategy. Culture must ripple through every act of policy and business strategy.

When a leader signs the company name to a new contract or product, culture must be at work. When the company offers perks, benefits and feedback, culture must be at the heart of it all. Strategy goes nowhere without culture, and exponential leaders realize this.

Consider Your Company’s Cultural Message
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7 Fields and Professions That Are Beginning to Rely on Virtual Reality 

7 Fields and Professions That Are Beginning to Rely on Virtual Reality  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
1. Architecture & Real Estate
Soon the days of designing buildings with hand-drawn sketches will be completely gone, if they aren’t already. Today’s architects are becoming familiar with 3D software to design their projects, allowing them to design not just the exterior of the structure but the interior as well. This is great not only for architects, but also for realtors and homebuyers.

“A number of young tech companies are exploring an entirely in-VR experience when it comes to shopping for your next home,” write the Zolo Staff. “These experiences allow buyers to enter search criteria — like price, location, and the number of rooms — and then offer VR tours of the homes that meet the criteria. This new real estate technology can fundamentally change the way people shop for homes.”

2. Hospitality & Tourism
In the same way that people can scope out new homes and buildings from the comfort of their existing home, VR allows for tourists and vacationers to preview their destination spots in detail. Some people are even using VR to fuel their entire vacation!

“One of the most common uses of virtual reality in the hospitality industry so far has been the creation of virtual travel experiences, using 360 degree video technology,” write the experts at Revfine. ”Through this, users can experience a virtual recreation of different aspects of travel, from the flight, to arrival, to some of the key sights.”

VR is, no doubt, capturing the imagination of many who wish to provide entertainment and an immersive experience. While a user is in the virtual world, companies will begin to advertise using virtual means, drawing customers in with virtual marketing and PR campaigns, as well as augmented reality. Eventually, it won’t just be vacations or tourism, but everyday tasks like learning and teaching that will accommodate VR.

3. Teaching & Learning
Educators the world over are turning to VR to bring immersive experiences to their students. In the same vein as the tourism and travel niche, innovations like Google Cardboard allow teachers to take their students on a field trip anywhere in the world — and even off of it! — without leaving the classroom.

Some argue that the classroom itself will undergo a virtual transformation, shifting to an entirely online format. As it is, telepresence learning and work can be facilitated with two-way cameras and the internet. However, ASU Online mentions that “as online learning continues to evolve, students will be presented with even more options — through virtual and augmented reality — giving them more choices and creating a richer, more immersive learning experience.”
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What does your FOMO look like?

What does your FOMO look like? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
People are more involved and connected than ever before. There’s always something going on, and somebody’s posting about it. Are you in, or are you out?

With all this awareness, fear of missing out, or FOMO, is rampant. It’s easy to get seduced into thinking that just because we can be involved or included, we should be. Or, if we aren’t, something bad might happen. The pressure is unbelievable.

While today’s FOMO might be more intense than in previous generations, the psychology behind it is the same. Fear of missing out comes in two forms: Victim FOMO and Rescuer FOMO.

Drama and fear of missing out
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Beware These 10 Innovation Killers – Innovation Excellence

Beware These 10 Innovation Killers – Innovation Excellence | digitalNow | Scoop.it
1. Believe that innovation will just happen.

The belief that innovation will just happen makes about as much sense as the belief that a garden will sprout in your backyard without any planting, weeding, or watering. Innovation requires a proactive process that identifies, validates, and nurtures ideas into value. The challenge is that the overwhelming majority of ideas will not pass muster but without a process you’ll not only ignore the ones that aren’t valuable but also ignore those that do.

2. Tell everyone to “think outside the box,” hold a brainstorming session, then call it a day.

Great ideas are the seeds of innovation; they are not innovation itself. Ideas are not in short supply. Spend an hour in a meeting with a few bright people and you will end up with dozens of new ideas. Then what? Where do those ideas go? Who evaluates them and shepherds them through the next stages? Ideas are not innovation. Companies that get innovation right build, implement, and communicate a process to support innovation, so that everyone is able to participate. In the end you have to have a formalized process for ensuring that ideas are nurtured.
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5 mindsets that contribute to poor results

5 mindsets that contribute to poor results | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The following five specific mindsets may cause you and others to behave in unproductive ways that diminish results and stifle your ability to work well with others: 

To be right, not wrong
To be respected, not disrespected
To be in control, not out of control
To be appreciated, not unappreciated
To be safe, not unsafe  
Because what you think determines what you do and say, it is important to understand how your thinking affects your results. These mindsets, taken to the extreme, usually result in the exclusion of others and can have disastrous effects on your ability to learn, inspire, lead, and collaborate with others.  
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The ROI that today's leaders need most

The ROI that today's leaders need most | digitalNow | Scoop.it
How do you decide what factors to align and to risk for gaining the highest return on investment? How often do you factor in the return on integrity?

When there is consistency between what people say and do, we call that integrity. We say they “walk their talk” or “keep their word.” We sense integrity when a person’s work appears to be guided by a deeper moral-ethical commitment. Integrity is not only the opposite of the immoral and unethical behavior so often reported in the news.

The best ROI comes from aligning who you are on the inside -- your values and fears, your hopes and your limits -- with your outer life of work and relationships. When you risk showing up as your whole self, engagement can shift and so can success.

A social entrepreneur named Ed was burned out after too many years on a nightmarish treadmill of chasing goals, working all hours, believing that if anything good were to happen he had to do it himself. For six years, basic self-care just didn’t happen. When Ed finally made time to reconnect with his underlying purpose and values, he began to see himself differently as a leader.

“The choice to stop and invest in reflecting is not logical when you’re in the middle of the intensity of doing all these things. But reflection time is extremely valuable in every way. It creates a space for emotional intelligence.”
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Employee activism challenges CEOs to take action

Employee activism challenges CEOs to take action | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Employees are starting to organize around social or political issues and pressure their companies to do something about them. This trend of employee activism deserves careful attention from companies because it is only going to grow and requires careful management by business leaders.

Several incidents of employee activism have drawn attention in the past couple of years. In late 2016, IBM employees rose up in response to CEO Ginny Rometty's open letter to Donald Trump in which she praised the then newly elected president for his corporate tax break plans and pledged to collaborate with him on areas such as government infrastructure and security.  Employees used Coworker.org, a website designed to help employees organize and launch campaigns to improve their jobs and workplaces, to issue a petition to IBM's leaders to take clear stands in light of Trump's immigration policies and other points.
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5 ways you can move outside your comfort zone

5 ways you can move outside your comfort zone | digitalNow | Scoop.it
1. Adapt or die
When you move into the unknown, it’s essential that you adapt to the situation if you want to land on your feet. Assess the best way of interacting with your team. Analyze new information in its context. To be a successful leader, you must evaluate what you think you heard and understand it from different angles.

How to make it work for you: Take what worked for you in the past and modify it to match your new situation. Chances are good that this is not the first time you’ve adapted when you’ve moved into the unknown. Grab and pen and paper and write down your survival tactics and why they worked. Mine your  experiences and let them guide you as you move out of a comfort zone in your current circumstances.

2. Keep your ego in check
Ego looks for ways to prove it is right and others are wrong. When we keep ego in check, there is room for the wisdom of others to get in. We are able to listen more deeply, learn with an open mind, and adapt new skill sets.

The ego is always asking “How will this make me look? How will I benefit?” This is one of the reasons ego resists change. It reminds us that the devil we know is sometimes better than the devil we don’t know. We fear that when we step into the unknown, we will discover painful secrets about the world and about ourselves.

We keep ego in check when we allow ourselves the luxury of trial and error. Like a child who learns to walk, we experience a feel-good neurological response that can be stronger than our ego’s fear of looking like a loser. When we tackle new and difficult challenges, we experience a rush of adrenaline -- a hormone that makes us feel confident and motivated.

How to make it work for you: You can step out of your comfort zone and move the focus away from the ego’s discomfort at the same time. Simply ask yourself, "What am I learning about me? What am I learning about the other people in this situation? How can I use this information in my professional and personal lives?”
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