Digital Evolution of Schooling
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Digital Evolution of Schooling
The Digital Revolution has had a profound impact upon the world, particularly its lives, learning and work, over the last twenty plus years. Globally the digital has transformed the nature of virtually all organisations, transforming analogue operations into digital. A major exception has been within schooling. While there are pathfinding schools globally that have transformed their workings as well as any of the digital master’s in business they remain the exception. As Lee and Broadie document in Digitally Connected Families: And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016 most schools remain Industrial Age organisations, leaving it largely to the digitally connected families of the world to lead the children’s learning with the digital, from birth.That said there are schools globally striving to go digital, to emulate the achievements of the pathfinding schools and genuinely collaborate with their families in providing a 24/7/365 mode of schooling that will go a long way to educating the young for a digital and socially connected world. This curation is designed to assist the digital evolution of those schools, and help overcome the very considerable challenges to be met to achieve whole school digital normalisation.
Curated by Mal Lee
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Teaching with Technology in 2018

In our third-annual ed tech survey, teachers reveal an overwhelmingly positive attitude toward tech in the classroom and its impact on teaching, learning and professional development.
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Banning Cellphones in Class: Why is the Policy Making a Comeback?

Banning Cellphones in Class: Why is the Policy Making a Comeback? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
One of the Doug Ford Ontario education reform proposals that's attracted relatively little attention is the June 2018 election pledge to ban cellphones in class.In the immediate aftermath of Ford's election, education observers would be wise to take a serious look at the sweeping promise to "ban ...
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How Smarter Phones Will Transform Tech, Media, and Telecom

How Smarter Phones Will Transform Tech, Media, and Telecom | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
A new generation of devices, powered by artificial intelligence, could be in consumers’ hands within a few years.
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The phases of digital transformation

The phases of digital transformation | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
To accelerate their digital transformation efforts, enterprises should focus on small, fast-moving teams, ecosystem participation and machine intelligence.
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Banning the Kids' Smartphones Will Make no Difference

Banning the Kids' Smartphones Will Make no Difference | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Should schools ban kids' smartphones and digital technologies in the classroom? Mal Lee and Roger Broadie argue that it's the schools who will miss out.
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Mary Meeker's Internet Trends Report 2018 for Banking

Mary Meeker's Internet Trends Report 2018 for Banking | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
This annual analysis of technology and internet trends from Mary Meeker, the world's foremost authority on digital channels, is an essential guide for financial marketers.
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“We can’t ask teachers to be innovative in their practice while administrators do the same thing they have always done.” –

“We can’t ask teachers to be innovative in their practice while administrators do the same thing they have always done.” – | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
“I am not a teacher but an awakener.” —Robert Frost I tweeted this recently about the ideas of engagement and empowerment.  Engagement is more about what you can do for your students.E…...
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unctad.org | Digital skills are not optional in today’s tech-savvy world

Profound changes for all Speaking in a video message, the meeting also heard from Geraldine Byrne Nason, chair of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, on the importance of coordination between intergovernmental bodies. To help guide the conversation, UNCTAD prepared a background report, steered by Shamika N. Sirimanne, director of UNCTAD’s, division on technology and logistics, and head of the CSTD Secretariat. Setting out the issues The remarkable technological progress the world has seen recently is transforming the fabric of our lives. The profound changes – driven by the spread of new information and communications technologies (ICTs) – will affect everyone’s life and every country’s economy. For example, sensor devices deployed all over the world are improving agricultural productivity and making it possible to map and control epidemic outbreaks. And digital platforms are creating new job opportunities. But Big Data can unfortunately also be used to influence democratic processes – as the world witnessed in recent elections in the United States and Europe – and automation means that certain jobs will no longer be available for humans. “Opaque algorithms can ‘bake-in’ bias and exclusion,” Ms. Malcom said. Whether the effects of technological change will be more positive than negative depends on the getting the right skills into the right people’s hands. Miriam Nicado García, rector of Cuba’s University of Informatics Sciences (UCI), explained how her university was a new venture, begun in 2002, that aimed to tackle this problem for her country. Software produced in Cuba for health, education, legal and tourism applications was being made available free to other countries, she said. A skills mismatch Estimates show that already by 2020 90% of new jobs will require ICT skills. Yet more than one-third of workers in developed countries that are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) currently lack the digital know-how needed. And over half the population in these economies have no digital skills at all – with female employees usually being less tech savvy than their male counterparts. “The more we let the gender divide grow, the more economic disparities will grow,” Ms. Dalli said when explaining the proactive measures Malta had taken, as a small island nation with few resources, to promote women in STEM fields. In fact, technology in the workplace can affect women and men differently. ICT service jobs are normally well paid, but the share of women in such positions remains very low, especially in developing countries. A recent survey among 13 major developed and emerging economies showed that female workers tend to hold low-growth or declining occupations, such as sales and administrative jobs. Although women are less represented in sectors threatened by automation, such as manufacturing and construction, the report prepared by UNCTAD ahead of the event says that since there are few women in STEM job families, they may not be well placed in the economy to benefit from the increasing demand for workers with tech skills. Such a mismatch between what businesses need and what job-seekers offer will slow economic growth significantly. What’s worse, portions of the population could become unemployable. And with unemployment levels already high in many parts of the world, such a situation would be devastating, not just for the individuals but also for their families and communities. Getting the right skills in the hands of the workforce will be even more important in developing countries, where billions of young people will enter the job market in the coming decades. In Africa alone, about 11 million young people will enter the labour market every year for the next decade. If governments don’t help equip new job seekers with the right skills, they may have to deal with rising youth unemployment. However, according to Sophia Bekele, founder & CEO of DotConnectAfrica Group, whose works helps African women run tech start-ups, developing countries may have a competitive advantage over older, more developed markets. “The global South has best opportunity to leapfrog in the digital economy instead of reinventing the wheel,” she said. Four levels of digital competency According to the UNCTAD report, four different levels of digital skills are needed during the journey from adopting new devices to creating new technologies. “The most fundamental skill sets for individuals and companies in the digital era are capabilities to adopt new technologies,” the report says, adding that “digital literacy for all is a basic requirement for every citizen to participate fully in the digital society.” So every country, no matter the stage of economic development, needs to have in place basic digital education and training programmes for all its citizens. For people, being “digital literate” means being able to use the basic functions of common devices, such as a computer. For a business, it means “knowledge about ICT installations in the existing business system,” the report says. But more and more professions, even beyond the ICT sector, require the ability to adapt and creatively use available technologies. And it is when a countries workforce can modify existing technology or design new systems and devices technologies that real value is added to the economy. “To maximize the benefits of new technology, countries and companies in developing countries need to have the digital skills to introduce modifications to new technologies,” the report says. This is because advanced technologies are often designed for contexts – both technical and social – that differ from the realities of many developing economies, and therefore must be adapted to the local context, the report adds. Adding a gender dimension to the issue of context, Ms. Malcom said that very often, time itself was a scarce commodity for women that policies designed to help them must reflect. A moving target Technology’s impact, however, extends well beyond the labour market, and being tech savvy has increasingly become important for enjoying a good quality of life in what has become and increasing digital world. “With increasing numbers of software and applications being used to accomplish everyday communicational and informational tasks, basic knowledge of ICTs is now essential for citizens to solve everyday problems, as well as to engage in community activities,” the report says. Digital skills are a multifaceted moving target. According to the report, six major drivers influence what technical competencies people need: “Increasing globalization, extreme longevity, workplace automation, fast diffusion of sensors and data processing power, ICT-enabled communication tools and media, and the unprecedented reorganization of work driven by new technologies and social media, which are massively increasing collaboration opportunities.” But the other, more specific digital competencies required will likely depend on the country’s economic specialization and industrial development. For example, the report says, “Countries where the manufacturing sector dominates economic growth will require talents, experts and a workforce with specialized skills in industrial robotics, automation and the Internet of Things.” While the skills that workers need to use technology increases, so does the list of the complementary soft skills necessary to perform in the digital economy. Human skills in a robot’s world But digital skills are not enough to adapt to changing labour markets demands. Paradoxically, as work becomes more automated, the unique human skills that cannot be easily replaced by machines become ever more important. So building and strengthening skills such as complex problem solving, critical thinking, and creativity, will be essential to create the flexibility required for the current and future demands for the workplace, the report says. The need for human creativity and innovation helps explain why professions like engineering and science are less at threatened by digitalization and computerization, the report says. Likewise, occupations that involve sophisticated communication skills will also be in a better position in the digital era. “For example, natural language processing algorithms can detect emotions underlying text, but are often inaccurate in comprehending sarcasm, humour or irony,” the report says. Finally, even if computers and robots could perform every task, economies would still rely on people to come up with the new businesses ideas. That’s why the report calls on governments to equip people with the digital entrepreneurship skills.
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Being Digital | The Digital Evolution of Schooling

Being Digital | The Digital Evolution of Schooling | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Mal Lee and Roger Broadie  In 1995 Nicholas Negroponte wrote in his seminal work of ‘being digital’. The book didn’t define what was meant by ‘being digital’, but simply exemplified what it was likely to mean. Twenty plus years later, and the movement from an analogue to digital society and with more than half the world digitally connected we can go a long way to clarifying what is ‘being digital’, and to attest why the growth of this capability is critical to the life and education of world’s young, from birth onwards. Over the last twenty plus years, but particularly the last ten society worldwide has largely unwittingly adapted it ways to accommodate the Digital Revolution and naturally evolved a mode of learning with the digital, from birth onwards (Lee and Broadie, 2018). It is the state of being digital. It is already core to the young’s learning worldwide outside the schools, on trend to grow in importance as the digital technologies evolve, becomes increasingly sophisticated and powerful, and digital ecosystems underpin virtually all areas of learning. It is far more than digital proficiency. While dependent on that proficiency, it is a mindset, a mode of thinking, an expression of values, a set of ever rising expectations, an ability to draw on many connected elements, a way of learning and understanding how to learn, a taking charge of one’s own learning, being able to network, to accommodate accelerating change, to continually grow the capabilities and to use them 24/7/365, lifelong. It is a suite of linked attributes that will naturally evolve in harmony with the evolving digital technologies, technological practises and changing social mores. It is a suite that simultaneously draws upon and enhances the other areas of learning. It is moreover a suite that while containing many common features is individualised, with each child in being digital having the capabilities needed to pursue their interests and passions. It is most emphatically far more than a variant of handwriting or digital literacy. It is a connected way of learning that is richer, higher order and more diverse, which can amplify all the non-digital learning interactions. As the children within digitally connected families grow, mature, develop their cognitive, inter and intrapersonal abilities, become sexually aware, build relationships, socially network, operate at a higher order of thinking and continually attune their ways to the evolving technology so they will develop their own form of being digital – and will continue doing so, in subtly different ways, at the various stages of life. Being digital as a low caste child in Mumbai, a Masai herder’s boy, a seven year old girl in Riyadh, a ten year old in outback Australia, an Inuit teen or a sixteen year old in Vancouver, Seoul, Sao Paulo or Edinburgh will in many ways be different. But that said all those young people will also have many common attributes, not least is being digitally connected and able to take charge of their learning with the digital lifelong – albeit in their respective cultures, outside the classroom. The global variability, the continual evolution, and the individualised and highly integrated nature of being digital should quash any moves by education authorities to try and assess the capability, and particularly to try and compare student attainment nationally and internationally. But let us be clear and affirm that the billion plus digitally connected young have never had need for their being digital to be formally assessed (Lee and Broadie, 2018) and that it would be educationally invalid, inappropriate and unnecessary to do so. Rather let’s recognise what being digital is, and appreciate that in many respects it mirrors the development, importance and the way schools handle children’s ability to speak. They both grow naturally from birth onwards, if not earlier. Both likely build on inherent capabilities. With speech those inherent capabilities have been obvious for thousands of years.  Being digital draws extensively, particularly with the very young, upon what has been for centuries a largely dormant visual intelligence (Strom and Strom, 2009) that was most obviously brought into play from 2007 and the release of the various touchscreen technologies. While employed increasingly from the 90’s the visuals controls of the iPhone were a game changer, allowing all the young, and not just the teens to readily use and learn with the technology (Lee and Broadie, 2018). The visual cues on the touchscreen suddenly made it simple for those in the first year of life to mimic their parents and siblings use of the technology, and by the age of three to largely establish the approach to learning with the digital they would use lifelong. By three most children born into digitally connected families will have normalised the 24/7/365 use of the digital, to the extent its use is so natural as to be invisible. Both are of critical educational importance in a digital economy, and need to underpin all learning. Tellingly both have been naturally grown by the family, with government and its pre- schools and schools playing a limited or no part, except with children who have difficulties. Tellingly – but invariably forgotten – in an era where the focus is on the basics and testing the young’s ability to speak has rarely been rarely formally assessed. The development has been left to the family. The big difference between the two vital capabilities is that while the importance of speaking has been understood for literally thousands of years the educational centrality of being digital is a long way from being fully appreciated by most in authority. Most governments and schools worldwide have over the last twenty to thirty years have tinkered with aspects of learning with the digital. They have focussed on some of the parts and never the totality of being digital. They have toyed with programming, web design, learning to use Office, cyber safety and more recently coding, but only ever within the school walls, always deciding which aspects of being digital are appropriate to be taught and assessed – and which should not. It is difficult to find schools that have naturally grown Negroponte’s concept of being digital. It is similarly difficult to find schools or education authorities who recognise being digital is a state of mind, with immediate access to an integrated suite of digitally based capabilities, coupled with the facility to use any of the capabilities and the understanding of how to learn when desired 24/7/365. They seem not to have grasped that the suite has evolved naturally, been individually shaped and can’t – like the facility to speak – be validly measured. They most assuredly haven’t been formally recognised in their teaching, assessment or resourcing the young’s being digital outside the school walls, or the central role the digitally connected families of the world have played over the last twenty plus years (Lee and Broadie, 2018) in facilitating and supporting the growth of that development. It is time this critical capability is seen, understood and accorded the kind of recognition given the ability to speak, and the educational, social, economic and logistical implications of being digital addressed as part of a wider contemporary education. The latter we’ll tackle in a follow up article. With the advantage of hindsight and historical analysis (Lee and Broadie, 2018) there might be value in pursuing the reading example further, accepting with being digital that the die will be largely cast by the age of three, that the young of the world will lifelong employ in their use of and learning with the digital the suite of attributes associated with being digital – regardless of what government of schools might desire – and leave the core digitally based education to the families. It is a radical thought, with immense implications, but there is much to be said for formal education complementing and adding value to the work of the digitally connected families, and ceasing senselessly trying to compete with the families in growing the young’s ‘being digital’. Conclusion At this point in history ask any digitally aware parent or grandparent what they understand by ‘being digital’ and they’ll likely quickly grasp the concept, but initially only at a rudimentary level, and that it will likely be only when prompted will they appreciate the many linked universal elements and their significance. The same folk will likely also pick up the reality that they – like the other 3.65 billion plus digitally connected of all ages are also ‘being digital’. While the strength will vary let’s remember there will be seventy year olds who have played a lead role in using and learning with the digital since the 1970’s who in their thinking and actions have long ‘being digital’. The new but largely unrecognised reality is that in the twenty plus years since Negroponte postulated being digital the world’s digitally connected peoples have become so. Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018) Digitally Connected Families. And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016, Armidale, Australia, Douglas and Brown – http://douglasandbrown.com/publications/ Negroponte, N (1995) Being Digital Sydney Hodder and Stoughton Strom, P and Strom, R.D (2009) Adolescents in the Internet Age Charlotte, Information Age Publishing
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Going All-Digital is Not an Option - It's an Imperative - EY

Going All-Digital is Not an Option - It's an Imperative - EY | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Contributed by EY | Video In this video, EY’s Financial Services, Digital Enterprise Transformation leaders Yang Shim and David Deane guide you through the five pillars of DET Platform.
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Five Lessons on Complex Adaptive Systems —

Five Lessons on Complex Adaptive Systems — | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
My last blog explored how earning my BA in Organizational Communication deepened my understanding of systems and described three system thinking approaches. Since earning my BA, and while continuing to use system thinking approaches, I expanded my curiosity and understanding into the world of complexity thinking. One of my mentors, Douglas Drane, has been a key influencer of my expansion in this field. Doug’s life work has been focused on his Complexity Model for business development, which presents an understanding of business as a complex adaptive system. The Model was based on decades of collaboration with brilliant minds across many disciplines to understand how small teams of aligned, high performance individuals can change the workplace for everyone. Doug and I have had countless inspiring conversations of how the world would be a better place if more people were complexity thinkers, which became the spark that brought The HumanCurrent podcast to life. Three amazing years since starting the complexity podcast, I continue to learn about complexity science and grow as a complexity thinker. My curiosity to further understand and apply complexity thinking at work and in other areas of my life led me back to school, this time to expand my complexity thinking lens as a leader. I experienced metanoia from earning my MA in Leadership from Royal Roads University; it was a transformational experience that shifted my mindset and understanding of the world and the complex adaptive systems that exist in the world. Douglas Drane, Mentor & Co-founder of the HumanCurrent As a systems thinker, I don’t ever recall a time that I couldn’t see systems. However, as I was learning about the various complexity terms and aspects, light bulb after light bulb went off, and having the words that explained what I understood gave me more confidence. What I learned from my MA was rich and invaluable, and while it did not result in me being fluent in "complexity speak", the following are some of the terms that have especially resonated with me and continually show up in my work, life, and all the things I do. Complicated versus complex. This was one of my first ah-has—a big light bulb. Understanding that a process or situation in a complicated system has a solution, even if it is confusing and involves many steps, is different than a complex system. Take an organizational chart for example. The flow of who reports to who can seem confusing, but one way or another it can be mapped out. However, taking the same organizational chart and adding the personalities, relationships, and history to those on the chart reveals a complex situation. I like to think of it as complicated situations can be solved or figured out; whereas, complex situations are something you navigate through. The “complex” part of a system implies there are layers of interconnectedness and interdependencies. Navigating through complexity requires a greater level of understanding, flexibility, and curiosity. I’ll also note that there are complexity scientists who are working on new mathematical models to work through today’s complexity. You can learn more and hear about some examples through our interviews with people like Yaneer Bar-Yam, Jean Boulton, and Melanie Mitchell. Complex ADAPTIVE systems. I had just grasped the understanding between complicated and complex systems when another light bulb moment happened with adding “adaptive” to the system. This was big for me. I had this epiphany that by understanding what complex adaptive system meant I was understanding the foundation of ‘complexity speak’. YAY me! All of a sudden, everywhere I looked I could see complex adaptive systems—systems that were always there, but it was like I saw them with a new lens. For example, the ecosystem, politics, global economics and socioeconomics, families and communities, and so forth. By adding “adaptive” to complex systems, it implies that systems are dynamic, that there is constant change, evolution and movement within the system. Emergence. The New England Complex Systems Institute stated that “emergence refers to the existence or formation of collective behaviors — what parts of a system do together that they would not do alone.” While earning my MA, emergence was a key theme as I coded data for my thesis. Here at the HumanCurrent, my co-host and I have trusted and embraced emergence to guide our work forward. We continue to be in awe when the perfect guest presents him/herself at the perfect time. On the podcast we have talked about how we trust the process, which we believe allows for emergence or for us to recognize and appreciate emergence. I would even go as far to say that the HumanCurrent is successful because of our philosophy and value of emergence. Feedback loops. While earning my MA I read countless articles and books, many of which I still refer to regularly. Peter Senge’s The Fifth Discipline is one of the books at the top of my list, especially when I think of systems thinking, personal mastery, and feedback loops. In my attempt to synthesize Senge’s definition of feedback loops, I’d say that feedback is a reciprocating flow of influence, which is both cause and effect. Of course for a more in depth description, I would strongly recommend grabbing a copy of Senge’s book. A significant ah-ha from my studies and Senge’s book was that feedback loops can be reinforcing and balancing (negative and positive), which are influenced by patterns and behaviors. I especially recommend Senge’s book if you’re interested in learning more about how feedback loops affect behaviors within a system and how those behaviors can influence a system’s behaviors. Interdependencies. As a lifelong systems thinker and growing complexity thinker, seeing and understanding interdependencies came fairly easy. However, a big ah-ha for me with understanding interdependencies was not in knowing the definition, but rather in appreciating what my understanding had to offer to a situation. I’ll explain. I had this impression that seeing and understanding interdependencies would make navigating through a situation or relationship easier. Boy was I wrong. You know that saying, “ignorance is bliss”? I think that in many cases, before I had an understanding of interdependencies, my ignorance made things easier to an extent. I could just "keep it real", do what I thought was best, and say what I wanted to say. With that mindset came all kinds of unintended consequences (and a great example of a feedback loop). Because interdependencies exist within complex adaptive systems, there is no ‘easy button’. In fact, it’s not about finding a solution; it is about navigating through a situation. While having an understanding of interdependencies doesn’t provide a magic formula or easy button, it does provide a deeper level of understanding and appreciation to navigate through situations in a meaningful way. This requires a mind shift and, I believe, leads to a heightened level of mindfulness where we appreciate the collective whole, not just the parts. These five lessons —complicated versus complex, complex adaptive systems, emergence, feedback loops, and interdependencies— have fundamentally fostered my complexity thinking. As a result, I believe I am a better co-host, employee, friend, and human. Another ah-ha just happened. Doug was right, the more complexity thinkers there are, the better the world will be. Thank you, Doug!   You can listen to the HumanCurrent podcast here and don't forget to subscribe in iTunes. Be sure to listen to our recent episode where we share our interview with Data Scientist & Professor at NECSI, Alfredo Morales.  Comment
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Five Great Books That Will Make You A Better Leader

Five Great Books That Will Make You A Better Leader | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Looking for books that will help you develop as a leader? These 5 books pack a remarkable number of insights per page and come recommended by executives across the country.
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The 4 Dimensions of Digital Trust, Charted Across 42 Countries

The 4 Dimensions of Digital Trust, Charted Across 42 Countries | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
A look at user sentiments around the world.
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Technology May Seek To Flatten The World, But The "Digital South" Will Chart Its Own Course

Technology May Seek To Flatten The World, But The "Digital South" Will Chart Its Own Course | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Let's hope the Silicon Valley CEOs and the citizen advocates and regulators who are working hard to re-build trust in digital technology are inclusive in their thinking, innovating and planning. Otherwise, they will end up solving the problems for a narrow portion of the digital planet.
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Digitally Connected Families

Digitally Connected Families | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The digitally connected families of the world over the last two decades have played a remarkably successful, yet largely unseen, lead role globally in the...
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No, mobile phones should not be banned in schools

No, mobile phones should not be banned in schools | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Smart phones are educational – and a big part of students' futures.
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Empower and Educate: Not Ban | The Digital Evolution of Schooling

Empower and Educate: Not Ban | The Digital Evolution of Schooling | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Avoid Damaging the Schools  Mal Lee and Roger Broadie Being digital in a universally connected world is a core educational capability all the young will require. At first glance, it is logical to expect schools to lead the way in growing that capability. When a nation like France decides to ban the use of smartphones in all its schools many will ask how is it going to ready its young for being digital?  The same holds of schools that chose to ban the children’s kit. Isn’t it better to educate them on the use of the digital astutely, than to ban the technology and abrogate responsibility? Shouldn’t the nation’s schools, funded to educate the young, be nurturing that core capability? As a general principle, the answer is yes. That said one must simultaneously also ask a question rarely posed – who is best placed to grow the young’s being digital? History (Lee and Broadie, 2018) affirms that while ‘being digital’ is in part an inherent capability, that will largely naturally grow from birth onwards it does require the astute guidance of elders to support and shape its appropriate growth. Seemingly highly logical. The answer as to who is best placed is however not black and white. Twenty plus years of history and digital disruption (Lee and Broadie, 2018) suggests the best way forward is rather more nuanced. Governments, schools, many academics and even the media seemingly have no doubt it should be the schools, with the teachers implementing the policies of government. History and near two billion digitally connected young say it should – and will be – the digitally connected families of the world. And that parents globally have – largely unseen – already adopted the new global normal, where the families play the lead role, from the day the child is born. The trend is very strongly for the digitally connected families to play an increasingly central role in nurturing the children’s learning with the digital, and for the schools at best to play a complementary role, and critically only when they are prepared to create a learning culture akin to, and build upon the leadership of the families. This development is a natural flow on from the Digital Revolution, and the continuing exponential digital evolution. The current reality is that it will make little or no difference to the world’s young being digital if most schools and governments ban the use of the children’s personal digital technologies in the classrooms. It hasn’t made any difference since the mid 1990’s when society began going digital, and the schools retreated behind their cyber walls and successfully repelled the Digital, and Mobile Revolutions (Lee and Broadie, 2018). Ironically the bans will likely negatively impact the schools more than the young. The natural growth of the young’s being digital will, on current trends, continue unabated. Most schools have long been dealt out of the main play in the young’s learning with the digital. Near on 70% (ITU, 2017) of the world’s young are digitally connected and have normalised the 24/7/365 use of the digital, from the age of three upwards. Governments and most schools globally have played no significant part in that connectivity. It has been – and continues to be – the digitally connected families of the world that have funded the technology and connectivity, and been willing to empower and trust their children to take charge of their learning with the digital, largely unfettered. The governments and schools have provided the families of the young little or no funding or support, all the while spending billions of taxpayer’s monies ineffectually on school technology. Indeed, from the mid 1990’s most schools have operated behind their walls, isolating themselves from an increasingly connected world, refusing to recognise the out of school learning with the digital, preventing the classroom use of the children’s mobile digital technologies, and leaving the families to fend for themselves. Significantly the schools have not – and still don’t – attach great importance on the digital underpinning all learning. They see no need to grow the children’s being digital as a core capability, or to move away from their use of the traditional highly controlled and structured, linear teaching, within what are still Industrial Age organisations. Critically most schools have not given their students agency over their learning with the digital. The students are disempowered, distrusted, have no voice in what is taught, are obliged to learn what the experts believe right, are compelled to use the school technology and to follow the dictates of the teacher. In marked contrast the digitally connected families of the world, from the 1990’s onwards believed being digital in an increasingly connected and networked world was vital for their children’s education and life chances (Lee and Broadie, 2018). Revealingly a 2018 US Gallup survey on digital devices concluded while 87.5% of parents believed they were important to their children’s education only 36% of teachers held that belief (Busteed and Dugan (2018). Tellingly the same poll revealed that while only 13% of parents believed the devices could be harmful to the children’s education 69% of teachers believed they would (Busteed and Dugan, 2018). While US figures little is the wonder that scant if any notice is taken of educators’ invariably negative advice on the acquisition and use of the most sought after devices in human history; devices that daily are becoming more central to life, learning and work in a digitally connected world. Significantly the families not only provided their children the technology but supported their use of a strongly laissez faire, non-linear, naturally evolving approach to learning, where the children largely took charge of their use and learning with the digital. As the technology evolved and became simpler to use so the age of those using the digital outside the school walls plummeted. For at least the last five years, most children born into digitally connected families will by three have largely naturally grown the key elements of being digital, capabilities they will use, and grow lifelong – regardless of what schools or governments desire. The die is largely cast before governments and their schools come into the children’s education. The young will only use the structured learning approach of schools when compelled. The several billion digitally connected young – and those millions being connected weekly – are not about to give up the agency over their learning, and abandon their highly successful, enjoyable and strongly individualised approach that naturally keeps them at the cutting edge. They are not about to revert to a dated, ineffectual approach, where their learning with the digital outside the classroom isn’t recognised, and they are distrusted and disempowered. Governments and schools could learn much about who is best placed to grow the young’s being digital by comparing the development with the young’s learning to speak. Both are inherent capabilities, naturally grown by the parents in the family setting, ‘operational’ with most children well before starting school. Tellingly learning to speak – although one of the most basic of educational capabilities – isn’t formally taught by the schools, except with children struggling. A core skill that underpins all learning is naturally collaboratively built upon by the school and family. The growing of the nation’s young ‘being digital’ from birth onwards, and having it underpin all learning 24/7/365 could and likely should be approached the same way. It would necessitate the schools – and government – recognising the families’ lead. It would oblige them to appreciate that for decades the best teaching practice with the digital has been be found outside the school. It would entail schools growing a learning culture like the families, and being willing to empower and trust the young. The schools – like with speaking – would be complementing the efforts of and adding value to the efforts of the digitally connected families. That is what is happening with those exceptional schools globally that have long ceased doing the digitaland are being digital. Schools, governments can continue to operate alone, controlling every facet of learning with the digital within the school, dismissing the efforts of the digitally connected families, banning the student’s use of the personal technologies and declining to build upon the children’s digital base but all that will do is lessen the standing and relevance of the schools. Children and families that have only ever known a digitally connected world will regard those schools increasingly as out of touch with reality, dated and irrelevant, with the students becoming increasingly disengaged and likely alienated. Hand written exams are not their world. The young – with the support of their family, peers, networks – will continue to take charge of their learning with the digital, to grow their learning how to learn and to apply that talent in an increasingly connected world to learn what they desire, by-passing the schools when they want. Schools that try and compete with the families will lose. What little influence they have with the digital will continue to decline as those schools lag increasingly behind the families’ thinking and usage. Significantly the schools that try and compete, and which ban the technology will deny the nation’s digitally empowered young the opportunity to work with many talented professionals, who if empowered and allowed to fly can take the children’s thinking and learning to an appreciably higher order. The untapped potential of the digital remains immense. All the nation’s young – and not just the ‘self-starters’ – need to be challenged and extended. It is not enough for the young to be digitally proficient – all should be continually challenged and supported by astute teachers and innovative teaching to operate at a high plane lifelong – whatever the young’s interests and passions. Conclusion While the history, research and logic strongly suggests governments and their schools should move immediately to genuinely collaborate with the digitally connected families the same history, and governments near universal desire to control every facet of schooling, suggests very strongly it isn’t about to happen. There will be exceptional schools, and likely more exceptional schools that will be willing to distribute their control of the teaching and learning, and genuinely collaborate with their families, but most will not (Lee and Broadie, 2018). Most schools, usually with the support of government, will continue with their insular Industrial Age ways, placing limited importance on being digital or empowering the young to take charge of their learning, and banning or inordinately controlling the young’s school use of the technologies they use 24/7/365. Busteed, B and Dugan, A (2018) ‘US Teachers See Digital Devices as Net Plus for Education’. Gallup April 8 2018 – http://news.gallup.com/poll/232154/teachers-digital-devices-net-plus-education.aspx?g_source=link_NEWSV9&g_medium=LEAD&g_campaign=item_&g_content=U.S.%2520Teachers%2520See%2520Digital%2520Devices%2520as%2520Net%2520Plus%2520for%2520Education ITU (2017) Measuring the Information Society Report 2017 Volume 1Geneva International Telecommunications Union – https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Pages/publications/mis2017.aspx Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018) Digitally Connected Families. And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016, Armidale, Australia, Douglas and Brown – http://douglasandbrown.com/publications/–
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Coming of Age Digitally: MIT Sloan Management Review Deloitte Digital…

Based on the global survey of more than 4,300 managers and executives and 17 interviews with executives and thought leaders, MIT Sloan Management Review and De…...
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The Impact Of The Unintended On The Digital Education Of The World’s Young 1993–2016

The Impact Of The Unintended On The Digital Education Of The World’s Young 1993–2016 | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
By Mal Lee and Roger Broadie The history of the digital education of the world’s young over the last 20-plus years reveals the natural unintended...
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Digitally Connected Families: And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016 | The Digital Evolution of Schooling

Digitally Connected Families: And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016 | The Digital Evolution of Schooling | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Mal Lee and Roger Broadie Three years ago, we embarked in researching the history of the digital education of the world’s young between 1993 and 2016, concerned the world’s schools were making little progress in going digital. The journey took us into unchartered, and largely unseen and yet fascinating territory where the families of the young globally had for the past twenty plus years successfully readied the young worldwide to learn with the digital, from birth. More than 60% of the world’s young are now digitally connected, and have normalised the 24/7/365 use of the digital – with no financial support from government. We are delighted to be able to now share our insights into this historic educational development – with the release of Digitally Connected Families: And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016. It is available at – http://douglasandbrown.com/publications/– At this stage, it is only available as an e-book. It is – as far as we know – the first historical analysis of the young’s learning with the digital, in and out of schools, in the period 1993 – 2016, from the release of Mosaic and the world going online, through to roughly today. The desire was to provide a research base upon which the authors’ and others could build. The chapters: Introduction The Digital Revolution and the Changed Nature of Youth, and Youth Education The Young, and the Evolution of the Personal Mobile Technologies Schools, Digital Education and Mobile Technologies The Evolution of the Digitally Connected Family The Two Models of Digital Education The Digital Learning Environments Learning with the Digital Pre-Primary Digital Education The Mobile Revolution On Reflection Conclusion
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Digitally Connected and Proficient at Three | The Digital Evolution of Schooling

Digitally Connected and Proficient at Three | The Digital Evolution of Schooling | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Mal Lee and Roger Broadie Children born into digitally connected families will likely be digitally connected and proficient by the age of three, be operating in the state of being digital, and have adopted the natural mode of learning with the digital they will use throughout life. The implications of this quite recent global development are potentially profound, but still largely unseen. The new reality became increasingly apparent in researching the authors’ Digitally Connected Families (Lee and Broadie, 2018a) and readying A Guide for Digitally Connected Families (in press). In examining the digital education of the world’s young since 1993, in and outside the school walls, and analysing the key developments in the period, particularly within the pre-primary years the following pattern emerged. What we now know is that the children will likely learn with the digital from the day they are born – if not before –  and mum and dad post the first photos and videos of the newborn to their friends and social networks. The parents – indeed the family’s – every use of the touchscreen technology will be observed, internalised and mimicked by the child from that day on. In the same way children have always learned. By the latter part of the first year of life the child will be trying to swipe on the family smartphones and tablets. By the latter part of the second year, and most assuredly by the third most children will be readily using all the main functions of the smartphones and tablet, will have begun taking control of their learning with the digital and using the laissez faire mode of learning with the digital (Chaudron, 2015), (Lee and Broadie, 2018). By three the signs and research (Chaudron, 2015) suggest most of the world’s children in digitally connected families will be largely directing their own learning with the digital. Moreover, they will naturally, though unwittingly, be operating in the state of being digital (Lee and Broadie, 2018b), having adopted a strong digital mindset, and grown and be using the core capabilities they have acquired in their natural informal learning with the digital (Lee and Broadie, 2018a). As with much learning in the formative years of life the die is seemingly largely cast very early, well before the children start school. By three they will likely have adopted for life an approach to learning with the digital almost diametrically opposite to that used in most schools.  While more research is required, particularly into the likely inherent aspects of being digital, ten plus years use of the touchscreen technology by the pre-primary globally, and a recognition of the children’s use of their inherent visual intelligence already provides an important insight into the pattern of learning. As indicated in ‘Being Digital’ (Lee and Broadie, 2018b) in many respects the learning timeframe with the digital mirrors the young’s learning how to speak, and the educational importance of speech. Tellingly both capabilities are largely in place before most governments play any formal role in the children’s education. Unwittingly from birth the parents – and likely the brothers and sisters, and possibly the grandparents –  become the child’s first and prime digital ‘teachers’. None of the family have any say in the appointment. Their every move with the digital in the child’s presence, astute or ill-judged, will – like many other aspects of learning – be observed and mimicked. All parents will have seen their mannerisms in using their mobile replayed. The lesson for all digitally connected families – and not simply the parents – is that if they want their children to use the digital astutely in growing an apt and balanced holistic education the family must model the desired digital usage, the values it wants to grow, and as family agree on the ground rules that will be ‘taught’.  If the parents immerse themselves in their own kit – if they immediately respond to every ping and call, even in the middle of a meal – those are the values the child will likely mimic and learn. The bit of being digital that is set in stone from age three is the absolute awareness that being connected aids their learning, and that connectedness is highly visual and aural, as well as being textual, and includes connection with people as well as information. They have probably also internalised that they can interact creatively with the digital environment and everything in it, to aid their learning. Hence the comparison with learning to speak, in that it is messy, diverse, involves a lot of trial and error and has concepts built and rebuilt from a multitude of influences. The potential for learning of kids that are digital is appreciably greater than for those of us who grew up pre-digital, with only our parents and limited friends to ask, verbally not visually. It is a new global reality all families – and indeed educators – need to understand and address. The corollary of this development is that children born into families not digitally connected – by circumstances or parent choice – will not be operating digitally by the age of three. They will likely show few of the attributes of being digital, until they normalise the 24/7/365 use of the digital. To what extent the lag will place them at odds with their peers, will set them apart from their friends, and the children without will be disadvantaged in a digitally connected world we don’t know at this stage. We can however appreciate why nearly all the digitally connected families of the world have chosen to give their children access to the digital technology from birth, and why today across the developed world in the region of 80% plus of pre-primary children (Chaudron, 2015), Johannsen, 2016) (Rideout, 2017) either own or have ready access to a tablet. We can also understand how a three year old girl in a digitally connected family in Nairobi has in a $US22 smartphone the facility, with the support of her family. to fundamentally change that girl’s education and life. Conclusion The first and most important step for all – parents, older siblings, carers, grandparents, early childhood educators and researchers and governments – is to recognise the new normal, its significance and to openly discuss the myriad of implications that flow from this global societal shift. Not least of those implications is what needs to be done with those families in the developed, underdeveloped and undeveloped world unable to afford digital connectivity for the newborn, and from what age? Chaudron, S (2015) Young Children (0-8) and Digital TechnologyLuxembourg, European Commission JRC and Policy Reports 2015 –http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC93239 Johansen, S.L, Larsen, M.C and Ernst, M.J (2016) Young Children and Digital Technology– Aarhus University, Aalborg University, Danish Media Council for Children and Young People, February, 2016 – http://www.aau.dk/digitalAssets/201/201213_national-report_2015_denmark_proofread-2-.pdf Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018) Digitally Connected Families. And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016, Armidale, Australia, Douglas and Brown – http://douglasandbrown.com/publications/– Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018) ‘Being Digital’ Linkedin – https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/being-digital-mal-lee/?published=t Rideout, V. (2017). The Common Sense census: Media use by kids age zero to eight. San Francisco, CA: Common Sense Media – https://www.commonsenseme- dia.org/research/the-common-sense-census-media-use-by-tweens-and-teens
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Business Debate | Organizing for digital maturity | Reuters.com

Business Debate | Organizing for digital maturity | Reuters.com | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Business Debate | Organizing for digital maturity...
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Why email is the best social network

Why email is the best social network | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The #DeleteFacebook trend has users searching for a better social network. Guess what: You’re soaking in it.
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Moore's Law Is Dying -- So Where Are Its Heirs?

Moore's Law Is Dying -- So Where Are Its Heirs? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The forward march of progress and the health of the economy rely on continued improvement in semiconductors.
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