Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement
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How do you raise $200 million? - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette

How do you raise $200 million? - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
With a one-of-a-kind medical school to pay for, the UI is about to find out
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Another Reason to Promote Social Equity in U.S. Metros: Job Growth - CityLab

Another Reason to Promote Social Equity in U.S. Metros: Job Growth - CityLab | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
In case public officials needed extra motivation.
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Our public universities are key to promoting social equity for all, and a chance to maintain and grow the middle class.

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Influencer Marketing: How to Work With Influential People |

Influencer Marketing: How to Work With Influential People | | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
Social Media Marketing Podcast 139, in this episode Doug Karr will explore influencer marketing and how to work with people of influence.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 3, 2015 8:40 PM

Doug Karr offers valuable insight into influencers and how to work with them to enhance your marketing.

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How a Positive Mind-Set Can Improve Fundraising

How a Positive Mind-Set Can Improve Fundraising | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
Thinking of donors as partners instead of sources of money will make them happy and bring better fundraising results, says one expert.
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Worth the ten minutes; take a break and listen!

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Higher education isn't in crisis - Washington Post

Higher education isn't in crisis - Washington Post | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
Janet Napolitano, the president of the University of California, on the tasks and hurdles of our universities.
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UNG raises $1 million for student scholarships - News at UNG

UNG raises $1 million for student scholarships - News at UNG | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
For the second consecutive year, the University of North Georgia (UNG) has raised more than $1 million for student scholarships.
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The benefits of learning social care the digital way - The Guardian

The benefits of learning social care the digital way - The Guardian | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
The Guardian The benefits of learning social care the digital way The Guardian That's why Skills for Care has been working with the Department of Health, the National Skills Academy for Social Care, the College of Social Work and the Social Care...
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Medical photo social network Figure 1 expands to Android and Web - iMedicalApps

Medical photo social network Figure 1 expands to Android and Web - iMedicalApps | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
iMedicalApps Medical photo social network Figure 1 expands to Android and Web iMedicalApps Not content to rest on their laurels, the Figure 1 team has been developing new features such as browseable image categories, and just last week...
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Encouraging Nonprofit Hospitals To Invest In Community Building: The Role Of ... - Health Affairs (blog)

Encouraging Nonprofit Hospitals To Invest In Community Building: The Role Of ... - Health Affairs (blog) | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
Encouraging Nonprofit Hospitals To Invest In Community Building: The Role Of ...
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Professional use of social media in Education, Research & Clinical Practice

This slideshow illustrates how social media is being used by physicians, health professionals and patients? Several resources and video clips on the topic are p

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Nuria Parra Macías's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:11 PM

"Let's be creative, innovative and agents of change..."

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Professional use of social media in Education, Research & Clinical Practice
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How patients learn in the digital age

How patients learn in the digital age | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
How Patients Learn In The Digital Age infographic by HealthEd.

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Top Digital Medicine Trends to Watch at CES - Fox Business (press release)

Top Digital Medicine Trends to Watch at CES - Fox Business (press release) | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
Digital Trends Top Digital Medicine Trends to Watch at CES Fox Business (press release) Three medical technology stories to watch in this arena will be wearable technologies for fitness, aging-in-place technologies, and real-time monitoring, which...
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Privacy, Social Media, and Public Health: A Changing Landscape

Privacy, Social Media, and Public Health: A Changing Landscape | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it

Communications technology use is growing at a near exponential rate on a global scale.1 A recent United Nations study shows that more people have access to cell phones than toilets, as 6 billion of the world’s 7 billion people (85 percent) have access to mobile phones, while only 4.5 billion (64 percent) have access to working toilets.2

Throughout the past 15 years, communications and information technology have become essential components of public health surveillance and research.3 This technology allows for cheaper and more accessible forms of disease surveillance and epidemiological research, particularly through the mining of online social network data. Social media has potential to change the nature, speed, and scope of public health surveillance and research by offering a real-time stream of user-generated updates from millions of people around the world.

Data mining is a field of computer science involving methods such as computational epidemiology, artificial intelligence, statistics, algorithm development, database systems management, and data processing to identify patterns in large sets of data.4 Data mining from informal Internet sources may lead to the discovery of new information about disease patterns, both communicable and chronic, as well as health risk behaviors. Moreover, developing risk prediction models from data aggregated from informal sources, such as social media, has great potential to supplement formal data sources in predicting disease spread.

Earlier intervention and control measures based on this information may mean the difference between containment and epidemic. In recent years, systems using informal data mined from social media sources have been credited with reducing the time it takes to detect an emerging outbreak, preventing governments from suppressing outbreak information, facilitating public health responses, and contributing to the generalizable knowledge about health risk behaviors in a quick and cost-efficient manner.5

Despite the inherent public nature of social media, there are many ethical implications inherent in the systematic acquisition of personal information, especially that pertaining to health. Concerns surrounding social network data analysis include issues of privacy, data quality, public panic, autonomy, access, and informed consent. While online social network data analysis holds great promise in the field of public health, it is essential that this valuable data be systematically harnessed in compliance with the law and ethical principles, keeping in mind salient privacy concerns, to yield population-level health benefits.

Social Media In Tracking Infectious Diseases

Infectious diseases account for more than 13 million deaths each year.6 It is estimated that 45 percent of the people living in developing countries have infectious diseases, making infectious diseases one of the leading causes of mortality for children and young adults.7 The threat of infectious disease is accelerating with the high mobility of populations due to airline travel and increasing resistance to antimicrobial medicines due to mutations.8 Given the severity of the infectious diseases as a public health threat, culling social media information for epidemiological surveillance during outbreaks is generally accepted as ethically permissible.

Data mining social media sources to track the early stages of an infectious disease outbreak has great potential in developing countries. Although developing countries often lack a strong public health infrastructure, they have burgeoning mobile communication infrastructures.9

Aggregating and analyzing social media’s informal data in near real-time allows public health officials to gain early insight into an evolving epidemic in order to help plan a response weeks sooner than formal routes.10 A two-week jump on an infectious disease may mean the difference between life and death; between containment and an epidemic. The quicker a potential disease can be located, the quicker public health authorities can establish control measures ranging from vaccinations and antibiotics to clean water.

Case Study: Twitter and the 2010 Cholera Outbreak In Haiti

Dr. Rumi Chanura and her team of researchers from Harvard University conducted one of the pioneer studies that demonstrated the value of social media data in monitoring an infectious disease outbreak. The study demonstrated the value of monitoring social media during an outbreak. The study analyzed information from social media sources, primarily Twitter, during the first 100 days of the cholera outbreak in Haiti in 2010. In Oct. 2010, 10 months after Haiti experienced a devastating earthquake, hospitals in the Artibonite River basin saw a swell of patients with severe diarrhea, vomiting, and dehydration.11

By Dec. 31, 2010, more than 170,000 people were afflicted with cholera and 3,600 lost their lives to the disease.12 According to the World Health Organization, “the devastating cholera epidemic provides stark reminder of the challenges that arise in the absence of the infrastructure and institutions that most of us take for granted.”13

Dr. Chanura collected 188,819 tweets and 4,697 online reports that contained the word choleraduring the first 100 days of the outbreak.14 The team analyzed the relationship between frequency of mentions and the occurrence of a secondary cholera outbreak, and evaluated them through risk prediction models.15 They found a close correlation between the aggregated social network data and the formal Haitian Ministry of Health data.16 The study demonstrated that informal data has been surprisingly accurate when it comes to disease tracking. The undeniably strong correlations between formal data and informal data collected from social media sources demonstrated that informal sources can produce reliable decision-making data during disease outbreaks in near real-time.

While Haiti lacks water and sanitation infrastructure for the prevention of cholera, the nation does have a strong mobile communication infrastructure. This communication infrastructure allowed for the sick, their families, their communities, and healthcare providers to share information about conditions on the ground, allowing cholera cases to be reported that may have otherwise gone untracked, since many patients never reported to clinics.17 This also allowed for speedier intervention with oral rehydration tablets and antibiotics in the afflicted areas.18

Hypothetical: Role of Social Media In HIV/AIDS Tracking, Contact Tracing, and Partner Notification

Having discussed the role of social media data in contagious disease cases in the developing world, it is time to turn to a potential role of social media data that is much more ethically contentious—the use of social media data in HIV/AIDS tracking.

The principle of confidentiality between physician and patient dates back to before the Hippocratic Oath.19Nevertheless, the scope of confidentially is subject to limitations, especially in cases where public welfare is endangered. Affirmative disclosure obligations have expanded throughout the years, and every state in the U.S. has some type of mandatory reporting of certain communicable diseases in place.

In addition to mandatory reporting, public health officials can exercise police authority to mandate contact tracing. Contact tracing is the process by which individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person are identified and later notified of potential exposure by a public health official without directly naming the infected individual. For the purposes of HIV/AIDS, this is generally limited to sexual partners or individuals involved in sharing intravenous needles. Despite its controversial nature due to privacy concerns, and potential deterrence of testing, it remains standard practice in nearly all states.

These concerns have inspired various legislative efforts. For example, the Mayersohn-Velella Bill, developed in New York during the early 1990s to prevent the mother-child transmission of HIV, mandated a three-step process to contain the spread of HIV through surveillance measures: 1) Doctors must report the names of HIV-infected patients to the state health department; 2) Public health officials are to contact those individuals for the names of partners whom they might have exposed; 3) Public health officials will contact the partners and be informed of exposure, but not specifically by whom.20 Additionally, the Ryan White Care Act, in effect today, provides grants to states to implement partner notification programs for individuals with HIV.21

It is not unprecedented for nontraditional methods to be used as a means of contact tracing as a last resort. Consider the example of Nushawn Williams in 1997. Williams, a 20-year-old male, was allegedly responsible for a “cluster” of HIV infections through sexual activity in Chautauqua County and New York City, despite knowledge of his HIV-positive status. Because of his self-declared intention of noncompliance, New York state and local health officials declared him a “clear and imminent danger to the public health,” and released his identity to the news media, an untraditional outlet to inform the public about an alleged public health threat.

Now consider the following hypothetical involving an adult HIV-positive male who is unwilling to cooperate with public health officials. He refuses to disclose his contacts in 2012. He also refuses to inform future sexual partners of his HIV status, will not use condoms during sexual activity, and continues to use popular social networking websites to seek out sexual partners.

Due to his refusal to assist in the identification of those exposed, and future noncompliance, the Department of Health and Human Services believes that social media could be of considerable use for the purpose of contact tracing to identify and notify individuals who may have been exposed. Taking into consideration the privacy implications of the proposed expansion of surveillance activities, would it be appropriate to incorporate social media into surveillance for the purpose of contact tracing?

There are two key conflicting principles in this hypothetical: 1) The privacy ‘right to be let alone’ by the individual, and 2) the public health interest as a ‘right to know’ of potential exposure. In other words, the state’s fundamental authority to protect the population’s safety and welfare is at odds with the individual’s legally protected rights to autonomy, privacy, liberty, and property. Under the Millian harm principle, which holds that “the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others,” intervention and regulation on individual behavior is justified so long as it prevents harm and risk to others.22

To intrude on individual liberties, the state must first demonstrate a rational and legitimate interest in intervention.23 Accordingly, one must assess the nature, duration, probability, and severity of risk at hand. In the case of HIV, there is a potentially high duration and magnitude of harm if exposed, so there is a clear rational interest for intervention. It can be argued that there is a duty for public health officials to warn exposed individuals. The population’s reliance on the protection from the state implies an ethical obligation for the government to exercise its authority to ensure health and safety.24

Generally, public health policy strives toward the least restrictive means of intervention to be exercised, to not unduly compromise the rights and liberties of an individual.25 Accordingly, the use of online social network data without consent should be seen as permissible only as a last resort, rather than standard practice.

While it is often argued that individual liberty must be subordinated to protect the common public health good, it is important to weigh the incidental costs of implementing policies, such as decreased levels of public trust and deterrence of HIV testing. Consequently, the proposed policy of using online social network data in contact tracing may translate to reduced rates of public cooperation, which may make a community more vulnerable to public health harms.

Privacy Concerns

Privacy is an inherently complicated topic in the field of public health. Balancing the protection of an individual’s personal health information with the need to protect public health is no easy task. Advancements in information and communication technologies only further distort the boundaries between what is public and what is private.26

Users of online social networks often share identifiable information about themselves, including their full names, birthdates, email addresses, GPS coordinates, job titles, and the names of their employers.27 By providing researchers with rich, ready-made data sets, social media is incentivizing researchers to develop innovative methods to search the Internet for health-related information. The mining and mapping of social networks, including names, dates, and places, has become a common practice, from market research to biomedical studies.28 It is important then to consider what obligations researchers and public health officials have in determining and meeting their online subjects’ expectations of privacy.

An individual’s constitutional right to privacy hinges on “whether that individual had a personal and objectively reasonable expectation of privacy.”29Similarly, the Code of Federal Regulations governing human subject research, 45 C.F.R. § 46.102, defines private information as individually identifiable information about behavior “that occurs in a context in which an individual can reasonably expect that no observation or recording is taking place, and information which has been provided for specific purposes by an individual and which the individual can reasonably expect will not be made public.”30

While mining publicly available data from open sources is within the letter of the law, it raises a number of ethical issues. Some might argue it seems unreasonable that a public posting on a public site can hold an expectation of privacy. However, privacy can conceptually be considered to be an individual’s right to determine what information one would like to share with others and the ability to control when others can access that information. While the practice of data mining is growing, many social media users are unaware of how public their data is.31

Privacy settings on some social media sites, such as Facebook, are complicated. Many individuals post information to be shared with an intended audience of friends, family, and peers, without the intent of being turned into research subjects by having their information collected, analyzed, and published without notification or consent.

The federal definition of human subject research is the “systematic investigation involving living individuals about whom a researcher obtains data through intervention or interaction with the individual or identifiable private information.”32 It follows that such research activities would require institutional review board (IRB) approval. However, it remains unclear whether subjects in Internet research involving data mining of health information qualify as a human subject research under this definition.

Researchers must take into consideration the level of sensitivity of the information detected, such as stigmatized health conditions. Recent studies have shown that the Internet is used more often by patients with “stigmatized conditions,” such as mental disorders or sexually transmitted diseases, to get health information and communicate with healthcare professionals than by patients with “non-stigmatized conditions.”33

The misuse of such data collected from the Internet by researchers can have maleficent consequences, such as stigma, discrimination, and discomfort of the subject.

Accordingly, researchers and bioethicists are left to grapple with the issue of determining when it is permissible to turn unsuspecting individuals into a research subjects without notification or consent.

Autonomy and Informed Consent

Voluntary informed consent of study participants is a cornerstone of modern biomedical research ethics. Many ethical issues arise when it comes to respecting the autonomy of human subjects in Internet-based research. Respecting the autonomy of subjects necessitates that prospective subjects are given adequate information to make an informed decision before agreeing to participate in a study.

This is done properly through a formal informed consent process, which includes: 1) providing subjects with the information to decide whether to take part in a study (i.e., risks and benefits, compensation, duration of study, etc.); and 2) documenting the information was provided and the subject willingly volunteered to take part in the study.34 The principle question here, then, is whether or not it is necessary to provide informed consent to an individual before his or her informal data via social media platforms is mined for public health surveillance and research.

While it is generally accepted that data mining for public health surveillance in emergency circumstances and communicable diseases is permissible, it would be wise to develop an opt-out system on social media platforms for non-emergency research purposes. While this would surely lead to more incomplete data sets, it can be considered a small price to pay for protecting the privacy of patients, especially those with stigmatized conditions. Further, there are statistical methods designed to deal with missing data so that the incomplete data sets would not render the research impossible.35

Conclusion

Historically, advancements in bioethics standards have been reactionary to human subject abuses. It is vital to resist this reactionary approach to the lack of oversight in internet research and take a proactive stance to develop acceptable standard procedures for the use of big data sets culled from online social network websites before foreseeable abuses occur.

One need only consider the recent public outrage surrounding the National Security Agency (NSA) leaks on the federal government’s PRISM surveillance program, which included online social network data, to gauge the high salience of these concerns.

Achieving a just balance between maintaining individual liberties and ensuring the health and safety of the population is an enduring problem for authorities, particularly those in the field of public health. Champions of autonomy may view social media data mining as an unwarranted and potentially maleficent violation of one’s autonomy and personal liberties.

On the other hand, utilitarian thinkers may consider it a beneficent measure to ensure the health and welfare of the community. Accordingly, efforts should be taken to counter ethical concerns while reaping the benefits of being able to analyze the massive amount of online data available through social media for the purposes of public health.

Privacy concerns notwithstanding, the potential societal benefit of digital epidemiology remains clear. The utilization of social media has the capacity to transform disease surveillance and change how healthcare workers respond to public health emergencies. As public health threats become increasingly complex, trade-offs must be made to ensure the collective benefits of population health warrant infringement on individual rights, while balancing competing ethical, health, economic, and legal concerns.

Public health researchers must work together with policy makers, medical professionals, and bioethicists to develop unambiguous ethical guidelines to answer to challenges stemming from today’s technological advances and changing communications structure.

 


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Creating the College List - Huffington Post

Creating the College List - Huffington Post | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
If you are flexible and your goal is to attend a university that is a good fit for you, your interests, and your future, then creating a college list is paramount....
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Report outlines how millennials are changing the face of philanthropic giving - MiBiz

Report outlines how millennials are changing the face of philanthropic giving - MiBiz | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
Millennials, as they pertain to nonprofit organizations today, may carry the “next generation donor” label. But in just five years, millen...
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Local news and citizen engagement in the Internet age: Pew Research Center ... - Journalist's Resource

Local news and citizen engagement in the Internet age: Pew Research Center ... - Journalist's Resource | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
March 2015 report from the Pew Research Center examining the news ecosystems across three cities -- Denver, Colo.; Macon, Ga.; and Sioux City, Iowa.
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Why The Ohio State Buckeyes Prove That Great Leadership Starts With Emotion

Why The Ohio State Buckeyes Prove That Great Leadership Starts With Emotion | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
“What am I getting myself into?” thought Gene Smith as he gazed out the window at the ground passing by far below. It was the spring of 2005, and Smith was on a flight from Phoenix to Columbus, where in a few hours he would be formally announced as the new [...]
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A great article about the essentials of effective leadership that any CEO can learn from, beginning with #EQ. Also, great insight on Gene Smith's personal style - democratic, coaching, authoritative and affiliative - that explain the success of The Ohio State Buckeyes durong his tenure. #forwardthinking #GoBucks

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4 Lessons in Higher Education Engagement from "Animal House" - Nonprofit Hub

4 Lessons in Higher Education Engagement from "Animal House" - Nonprofit Hub | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
What can "Animal House" teach us about higher education engagement? Lots. Follow these tips and soon you'll be saying, "Thank you sir, may I have another?!"
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Social media: a transformative force in healthcare


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UI part of $62.5 million effort to improve medical-training devices - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette

UI part of $62.5 million effort to improve medical-training devices - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
UI part of $62.5 million effort to improve medical-training devices Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette Jump Trading, a financial technology company with offices in Chicago, New York and Singapore, has donated $25 million for a new partnership called...
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5 Reasons Why Mayo Clinic Dominates Social Media in Healthcare - HIT Consultant

5 Reasons Why Mayo Clinic Dominates Social Media in Healthcare - HIT Consultant | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it
5 Reasons Why Mayo Clinic Dominates Social Media in Healthcare
HIT Consultant
In 2010, the Mayo Clinic created the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media to coordinate and focus the Clinic's various social media initiatives and programs.
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Nursing experts warn of content accuracy on social media

Nursing experts warn of content accuracy on social media | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it

YOUTUBE videos showing poor hygiene and safety procedures for inserting catheters could be teaching techniques that put patients at risk, according to a study by nursing teachers.

A team of four researchers including Notre Dame University School of Nursing and Midwifery’s lecturer Peter Carr viewed 50 YouTube videos which gave instructions on central venous cannulation and peripherally inserted central catheters.

Mr Carr says YouTube has become a readily accessible learning resource with many benefits including students being able to watch as often as they needed.

But clinicians are concerned that some videos present information that hasn’t been peer reviewed and teaches the wrong methods.

Mr Carr says many of the procedures filed on YouTube failed to adhere to acceptable standards and urges students to use The Association of Vascular Access YouTube channel.

The channel features submissions that are peer reviewed by clinicians and academic members and reflect all the correct procedural steps for insertion.

The findings of the research have been reported in the article Assessing the Quality of Central Venous Catheter and Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Videos on the YouTube Video Sharing Web Site and published in the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access.

The 50 YouTube videos were critiqued and scored on criteria determined by the researchers, based around evidence–based guidelines from the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, the Australian Clinical Excellence Commission and the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

The criteria covered ten points including hand hygiene, use of sterile gloves, skin antisepsis and ultrasound pre-assessment.  

Mr Carr says among the most significant findings was the high percentage of videos where clinicians ‘operated blind’, without real-time ultrasound, which is a proven way of reducing insertion related complications and incorrect positioning.

Real-time ultrasound can prevent accidental arterials puncture and possible intravascular infection which can cause death.  

Mr Carr says blind insertion is a technical skill that superior surgeons have mastered over time but even they now recognised the important benefits of using ultrasound to visualise the anatomy before inserting.   

“If we are going to have good ethics and advocacy, we’ve got to be using these technologies,” Mr Carr says.

He says the YouTube investigation has resulted in further research, in collaboration with UWA Associate Professor James Rippey, investigating if using ultrasound to identify vessels has better outcomes for all vascular access devises.

 


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How to manage social media for your hospital?

How to manage social media for your hospital? | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it

 

Incentivizing Social Media

Having media accounts is useless without followers. Few patients have a reason to follow their hospital on Facebook — it’s up to marketers to convince them otherwise. Start by asking patients to like your pages and profiles (put your info on a business card, perhaps?) and even incentivize the process with drawings of gift cards for the gift shop or discounted parking, etc. Or, if you’re really into making a splash in the online community, send patients information via social media about upcoming appointments and health information they may find informative. The same idea applies to emailed newsletters, text message appointment times, and other reminders.

 

Visualizations

Marketers have found that people react better to bright, attractive imagery rather than boring blocks of Web text. When you’re making posts or publishing blogs on social media, accompany them with multimedia like videos, infographics, and images. People are more likely to halt their newsfeed scrolling if they come across something that pops off the page. Think visual when you start out on your campaign and find pictures and graphs that accurately reflect your information.

 

Website Linking

Websites can be like secondary storefronts for hospitals and healthcare organizations. In terms of social medical marketing, link to and from your website with your social profiles and keep it stocked full of new, original, and accurate information about your hospital and your service lines. As mentioned, the best marketing campaigns set you up as a professional authority in a field. Writing pamphlets, articles, and blogs can help support this idea — all you have to do is link them through to your website.

 

Enlisting the Masses

It would be impossible for you, a busy healthcare marketer, to do all of this on your own. Instead, enlist help from your staff and other experts. Did you get new technology? Ask a doctor or nurse to write up a few hundred words that you then publish on your website. Don’t be afraid to try new things, either; sometimes the most successful strategies are the ones no one has ever tried before.

 

Going Forward

The most important thing to do is to keep at it. Don’t give up if you don’t have every Facebook follower in town; focus instead on the long-term goal of creating an online brand and presence. Healthcare is a difficult, competitive field on the Internet. It is your job, and you should employ social healthcare marketing in order to support your organization as a source of valuable healthcare information and to provide patients with information.


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Nuria Parra Macías's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:05 PM

"Don’t be afraid to try new things, either; sometimes the most successful strategies are the ones no one has ever tried before". Sin duda, es una de las claves del éxito.

C. Todd Livengood's curator insight, January 27, 2014 2:06 PM

Essential in generating awareness and developing meaningful relationships with your community, your future customers.

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Online Patient Reviews: Power, Influence and Muscle to Grow Even Bigger

Online Patient Reviews: Power, Influence and Muscle to Grow Even Bigger | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it

If you thought that online patient review sites were important, you’d be right. But new survey data reveals their muscle has tons of potential to grow.

 

Unlike a few years ago, the research power of the Internet has transformed many patients into informed and empowered consumers. Looking for online information is often the first step in researching (and ultimately selecting) a doctor—based on quality of care, experience and even wait times.

 

Marketing savvy physicians and healthcare communicators monitor this newfound “digital sway” and diligently put forward their own Internet marketing to inform the public, attract patients and protect and extend their reputation.

 

But what’s surprising is that only one in four patients use online reviews to research doctors, according to a recent survey of over 4,500 US patients by Software Advice. And, for as influential as patient reviews have become, this data suggests that they have a frightening amount of room to get even bigger.

 

The relatively younger age groups that currently use online reviews also suggests potential for growth. In this survey, patients age 25 to 34 (31%) and 35 to 44 (29%) account for the largest patient/user blocks. It seems reasonable to conclude that, as the population ages, younger and Internet reliant patients will continue to take a place in these ranks.

 

Most Popular is not the same as Most Trusted…

There are dozens of doctor review sites, but HealthGrades (43%) and Yelp (34%) were cited in this survey as being the first to be used. But as a matter of “most trusted” it was—perhaps surprisingly—Yelp (44%) ahead of HealthGrades (31%).

 

Reviews don’t pull patients away from their insurance network…

Even when doctor reviews are stellar, only one in four of insured patients are persuaded to visit a doctor outside of their insurance network. “That means good reviews may just help you attract patients even if they’re not in a network you’re partnered with,” observes Software Advice. “But in a face-off, insurance networks still beat out online reviews.”


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Social Media Use in the United States: Implications for Health Communication

Social Media Use in the United States: Implications for Health Communication | Innovations in Higher Education Constituency Development, Fundraising and Advancement | Scoop.it

Given the rapid changes in the communication landscape brought about by participative Internet use and social media, it is important to develop a better understanding of these technologies and their impact on health communication. The first step in this effort is to identify the characteristics of current social media users. Up-to-date reporting of current social media use will help monitor the growth of social media and inform health promotion/communication efforts aiming to effectively utilize social media.

Objective

The purpose of the study is to identify the sociodemographic and health-related factors associated with current adult social media users in the United States.

Methods

Data came from the 2007 iteration of the Health Information National Trends Study (HINTS, N = 7674). HINTS is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey on health-related communication trends and practices. Survey respondents who reported having accessed the Internet (N = 5078) were asked whether, over the past year, they had (1) participated in an online support group, (2) written in a blog, (3) visited a social networking site. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of each type of social media use.

Results

Approximately 69% of US adults reported having access to the Internet in 2007. Among Internet users, 5% participated in an online support group, 7% reported blogging, and 23% used a social networking site. Multivariate analysis found that younger age was the only significant predictor of blogging and social networking site participation; a statistically significant linear relationship was observed, with younger categories reporting more frequent use. Younger age, poorer subjective health, and a personal cancer experience predicted support group participation. In general, social media are penetrating the US population independent of education, race/ethnicity, or health care access.

Conclusions

Recent growth of social media is not uniformly distributed across age groups; therefore, health communication programs utilizing social media must first consider the age of the targeted population to help ensure that messages reach the intended audience. While racial/ethnic and health status–related disparities exist in Internet access, among those with Internet access, these characteristics do not affect social media use. This finding suggests that the new technologies, represented by social media, may be changing the communication pattern throughout the United States.


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:39 AM
Social Media Use in the United States: Implications for Health Communication